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Fatboy Roberts Gets LOST In PROMETHEUS!

Beaks here...
It's way early in the PROMETHEUS discussion, but I'm pretty certain the majority of the praise/blame for the film's success/failure will be heaped upon screenwriter Damon Lindelof. And if you were an avid LOST viewer, it appears that the similarities between that show and what Lindelof has attempted here are unmistakable. Is this a good thing? The ever-perceptive Fatboy Roberts has some thoughts on the matter...

 

For those of you who were looking forward to PROMETHEUS, those of you who had already written off ALIEN3 & Alien: Resurrection, and let’s not even start in with the Alien vs. Predator movies; to those of you who were hoping Ridley Scott’s return to this universe, be it a Prequel/Sidequel, or whatever silly portmanteau is chosen to describe its place in the canon; for those of you hoping this would be the REAL ALIEN3, congratulations. You got it. This is the real ALIEN3.

Here’s the catch: It’s still basically just ALIEN3.

It’s taken almost 20 years, a resurrected Assembly Cut, and enough behind-the-scenes drama to fill a three hour documentary, for people to make peace with what ALIEN3 was, as opposed to what they wanted it to be. Will PROMETHEUS need as much time to settle into its own groove? That remains to be seen, of course, but what is obvious is that this movie will disappoint a lot of people, much like ALIEN3 did, just in completely different ways.

But first: Let’s talk a little bit about LOST.

This may not seem related in the slightest, but considering one of the names on the screenplay is Damon Lindelof’s, it’s completely relevant - most of the storytelling tendencies that appeared in LOST are completely intact in PROMETHEUS, for all the good and bad that entails.

LOST kept viewers coming back week after week for a few reasons. There was setting, of course; the strong character work, and the themes explored via that character work. But it was the questions that the story kept throwing off, like sparks from a roaring fire; the hints and feints at a deep, rich mythology somewhere underneath the surface of the island that fueled the audience’s passions. LOST was at its best, at its most addictive, when it was a puzzle box. Which is partially why so many people were disappointed as the show went on and the puzzle proved incomplete, pieces missing, grayish, wispy question marks littering the corners of the box like cobwebs of unsolved mystery.

If you’ve seen the succession of trailers for PROMETHEUS, you’ve had the entirety of the plot explained to you. Peter Weyland (Guy Pearce) is paying one trillion dollars for Meredith Vickers (Charlize Theron) to oversee an interstellar exploration on the Prometheus, captained by Captain Janek (Idris Elba), carrying lovebird scientists Charlie Holloway (Logan Marshall-Green), Elizabeth Shaw (Noomi Rapace), Weyland’s android creation David (Michael Fassbender), and a crew of skeptical scientists, to a moon where Holloway and Shaw believe mankind’s creators reside. They arrive on LV-226, enter a pyramid, and meet their makers. It does not go well.

Ridley Scott has made a beautiful movie, its visuals immersive and expansive. Blade Runner was not well loved upon release, either (although I don’t think time and hindsight will be anywhere near as kind to PROMETHEUS as it was to that movie) but the art design, and the world-building on display kept that film alive long enough for its riches to be mined at a depth most didn’t think was there. Scott still has those skills, and even with the copious amounts of CG, the film has a heft and weight to it that most sci-fi spectacle does not. The world Ridley is putting on screen is a lot less scuffed up and muddy than his first trip into the black with some truckers in space, but it feels no less real and lived in.

Fassbender’s David is fucking great. There’s no other way to put it. The only other actor approaching his level is Charlize Theron, and when they share the screen, the film jolts to life in ways that not even its horror scenes (which are not as plentiful as one might think) can touch. In fact, for as great as they are together, their shine illuminates the inefficiency in PROMETHEUS’ storytelling.

For example: we’re dealing with themes of birth and death, of creation and destruction. A loose familial triumvirate of Weyland, David and Vickers is introduced, and pursuing those themes using those three would seem to me to yield much richer results; but those themes are instead explored via Rapace’s comparatively boring Shaw, whose faith is questioned in much more mundane ways, through a connection with her glib boyfriend Holloway, and her father (Patrick Wilson), who we only see once, in a remembered dream.

Another thing PROMETHEUS and ALIEN3 share? Both are choked with good actors essaying characters that are barely more than interchangeable fodder for monsters; the Prometheus crew’s personalities, and their sacrifices, are just as trite and hollow as the prisoners’ on Fury 161.

Are the questions this film raises bold enough, intriguing enough, to paper over its missed opportunities? Will you become so preoccupied by scratching at the new ideas Lindelof, co-writer Jon Spaihts, and Scott are introducing that you’re willing to not only forgive PROMETHEUS its missteps, you’ll go back for more?

The questions about ALIEN that PROMETHEUS aims to answer are answered. Mostly. (If you heard Newt in your head, congratulations.) In fact, they were answered in interviews with Ridley Scott throughout the ‘80s. You want to know what the Space Jockey is? You want to know about that ship he was flying? If you’ve done a modicum of research into the ALIEN films, you already know. After all these decades, the story he chose to tell is basically the first thing he thought of: The Space Jockey is a bomber pilot, and his ship is carrying bioweapons.

But there are new questions introduced, of course. How are we different from the Space Jockeys, if in fact, we are? Do they care about their creations? Do we care about our own creations? Should we? On a less philosophical note - how do we get from the monsters we see here, to the monsters that we see in ALIEN? We’ve been told for months that this film isn’t an ALIEN movie, but the DNA is evident if you pay attention. They weren’t lying about that. When Scott does ramp up into full-blown horror, the results are visceral and freshly disturbing, echoing ALIEN, but playing a game of gross-you-the-fuck-out in new, sick ways. The film constantly carries a low, humming dread underneath its visuals, and when those fevered blisters of nightmare imagery finally burst, they pack a punch.

LOST made you want to come back because the episode endings were often giant, baited hooks. You needed to know what came next, and that caused you to go back through the episode, combing it for details that might provide you a better understanding of what might unfold the following week.PROMETHEUS follows that formula perfectly, often maddeningly so. Characters behave erratically, for no evident reason. Events occur, and then escalate, because characters inexplicably refuse to share the important information they do have. Logic will just drop out, like sound on an old, static-filled recording, reappearing just in time to fuel an exposition dump, leading to an intriguing idea, which is then thrillingly exploded – and then abandoned, as Scott turns and moves towards another bright, shiny idea. Audiences are left to gather the shrapnel and try to make sense of the disconnected craters left behind.

The result is much like ALIEN3 - a collection of intriguing concepts, beautifully shot, loosely strung together, paying off intermittently in self-contained scenes that whisper a promise unfulfilled, left for a sequel that Scott/Spaihts/Lindelof apparently presume is a foregone conclusion. Lindelof’s said what he has planned is to PROMETHEUS as ALIENS was to ALIEN. They seem to believe they’ve scattered enough pretty breadcrumbs, enough tantalizing hints to questions it didn’t bother to answer over the course of its own two-hour runtime, that you’ll be willing to forgive and follow along to the next movie.

And if you’re the kind of person who likes poking at broken puzzles, maybe they’re right.

Bobby Roberts

@fatboyroberts on twitter

http://cortandfatboy.com

http://geekremixed.com

Readers Talkback
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  • June 3, 2012, 4:15 p.m. CST

    First

    by faux1975

  • June 3, 2012, 4:15 p.m. CST

    It does look great

    by R.S

    but ultimately it's bloody boring in too many places.

  • June 3, 2012, 4:19 p.m. CST

    Saw it, loved it, suck it.

    by tomthumbstallywhacker

  • June 3, 2012, 4:21 p.m. CST

    Man, Ridley Scott lost his touch a long time ago.

    by Randy

    He can still do visuals, but the guy hasn't been able to tell a good story in a long time. I know a lot of people love American Gangster, but even it felt like a by the numbers crime film to me, nothing new or interesting.

  • Aliens is good, don't get me wrong, but I think Alien 3 fits better. Aliens is a little too action and over the top bravado. Of course, I am silly, because even with its huge flaws I liked Alien Resurrection enough (on its own really, it is obviously further away than Aliens was at being so related...and the damn alien at the end was terrible). Anyways, being closely related to Alien is great but the others fare well at being IMO looser with the universe. I'm looking forward to seeing this because it looks more like 2001 than Alien (not that it will be near as deep or intricate as 2001 is). Also, for what it is worth, I only own Alien personally, I never bought the others. Also, AvPs were shit, Predator is awesome, Predator 2 is watchable (and sort of like Alien 3 IMO as far as being different) and Predators is a good enough sequel. Just saying that to let you know where I am coming from Alien/Predator wise. I know my opinion means shit though, so let the bashing commence.

  • A lot of them seem out of touch or too interested in modern CG special effects. Which they abuse to tell bad stories.

  • June 3, 2012, 4:31 p.m. CST

    Couldn't have posted a better review!!!

    by Suhal Miah

  • I just don't get it, that is still one of the all time worst films in any franchise ever, it basically killed Alien forever. Aliens is about as good as a sequel gets, it takes everything from the original film and ups it to the next level. Alien 3 tells a mediocre story, with mediocre acting and has one of the single dumbest endings ever. Sure, the studio is to blame for the shit production and what Fincher had to deal with just sounded like pure hell.

  • June 3, 2012, 4:34 p.m. CST

    Good review

    by tomdolan04

    I dont agree in the slightest they should have set it up hanging the way they did when a sequel is not guaranteed and probably 4-5 years away even if it comes. <p> Nice writing style though. Its a 7/10 average flick.

  • If you can't ... you won't like it. Simple as.

  • June 3, 2012, 4:46 p.m. CST

    PROMETHEUS Has Landed!! Global Reader Reaction

    by Paddy

    I saw Prometheus here in the UK on the 1st June, sadly it sums up everything that is wrong with modern mainstream blockbuster film making. It's hung BADLY on a pre existing success. It does not live up to the hype surrounding the Director's return to the Sci-Fi genre. He lets himself down seemingly trying cater to the poor ADHD tastes of modern audiences. It's poorly scripted, lacking any of the subtlety or nuance that made the Director's previous Sci-Fi efforts so enthralling.

  • June 3, 2012, 4:51 p.m. CST

    @vameon.

    by Jay

    The new found Alien 3 love is part of the reason it's difficult to take many of the negatives comments here too seriously. There's so much flip-flopping. There's even a day old talkback with nothing but their love for the movie Macgruber. Given how polarizing many of the reviews are (Which are mostly positive mind you) I'd say the movie has certainly done something right. Even the negative reviews are asking thematic questions & pondering certain elements. This is not a "meh" movie. It brings out reactions. And I love it for that alone. I predicted a few weeks ago that many people will come out disappointed simply because it's not going to be what they expected. Scotts not playing by their rules. I just can't help but think that 2 to 3 years from now all these negative commentators will be the ones saying "I loved Prometheus when it came out. None of you were able to appreciate what it was doing at the time. But I did."

  • June 3, 2012, 4:52 p.m. CST

    if Alien³ HAD been 'Prometheus'....

    by CARTMANEZ

    Opens with the Sulaco survivors making it back to blade runner style earth ok and being blamed for blowing the LV426 colony by the Company. Newt (recast actress) goes off to live with relatives. Ripley & Hicks given court marshal/heavy prison sentences unless go along with team of scientists and crack special forces Space Marines to the supposed alien homeworld (located from ancient archaeological space maps) where they encounter... not the xenos….but the Space Jockeys Ripley instead of Shaw, Hicks in the Holloway/Janek role (Hicks would sacrifice himself to save earth), Bishop II instead of David etc Ripley goes off in SJ ship at end... R Scott could’ve directed it instead of doing that 1492 Columbus movie . HR Giger could’ve been back doing all the designs for the SJs, the Alien planet etc

  • June 3, 2012, 4:54 p.m. CST

    Score

    by Paul dobbs

    The music score should have been a lot darker in Prometheus. It was far too cheerful. There was no sense if the impending dread or creepiness that alien had and that they tried to bring across to the trailers. In general the whole film should have been weirder. A large part of it just felt like an episode of star trek.

  • June 3, 2012, 4:55 p.m. CST

    so so many problems here's a few

    by regan

    where do you start/end, crap plot it’s all over the place, is it alien is it a new film I’m not sure let’s just throw shit in anyway, actors just shift personalities without reason the dead alien is scary but I’ll go poke the live one anyway and get lost in a two way ship, plot holes, if we can’t explain something we'll just skip it (giant head/black goo/why create is and kill us/engineers created us but can’t speak and just smashes shit, if she has a self contained medical pod and is female why will it only threat men nobody knew weland was on board and that the pod was for her, poor dialogue. a trillion dollar trip based on some pictures on a wall, what was her boyfriend turning in to who cares let’s just burn him, electricity can bring a dead head back to live but explode it before we find out anything interesting. A giant ship is rolling towards me ill just keep running forward cause that's better than stepping right or left, ohh look a magic little rock saved me from a giant 100,000 ton ship isn't that lucky. am I a robot meet me in my room in 10mins and lets never speak of it again. let’s have a two hour debate on the origin of man ... I'm bored now let’s just blow shit up and have this thing fight this thing so we never have any answers or reason. Fox executive "put a queen in there or you’re not getting any more money sir ridley and let’s fly away for the sequel" $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$. Another thing is why send us to the weapons base and not the engineers home planet, was it always their intention to kill us. Why create us in the first place then send us to the weapons base didn't they know we would try stop the weapons development. why didn't she fly back to earth to warn us that others will come to kill us, she decided to fly to their home planet with no food or water and no sleeping pod she's fare to small to fit into the engineers pod so where will she sleep. How can David fly the ship he's just a head and she's a geologist with no robotic/flight skills. Scott created the world Lindelof filled it and wrote it. Lindelofs work on Lost is all over Prometheus. lost was based on holes and set ups that never really explained themselves in a fantasy island, it was based on you coming back next week for more set-ups and tiny bits of info that grew more and more each episode and you excepted the mystery. Lindelof tried to do this with Prometheus and he failed. With lost you only have to wait a week or a season. With Prometheus you have to wait 3 years for part 2 that may never be made. Prometheus aims to set itself up in the real world and as such plot holes and no answers don’t work people won’t except or wait for them to be explained in a film format.

  • June 3, 2012, 4:57 p.m. CST

    I can perfectly push through depressing stories.

    by Randy

    Not liking that film for that reason alone is total bullshit, that's like me saying you can't enjoy Star Wars unless you like special effects. There is plenty to Alien 3, both negative and good, to like or dislike the film, apart from it's tone and depressing story. It's perfectly possible to like some depressing stories and dislike others, what matters if said story worked for you. and for me, Alien 3's story does not work, and it had little to do with it being depressing, more with me not liking the characters or narrative. Also, that movie pretty much never had a proper script to shoot with and Fincher never had the right time or budget.

  • June 3, 2012, 4:59 p.m. CST

    BUT THE MONSTERS in it, why does nobody review the monsters??

    by Ice Paul

    I've read a ton of reviews for this now and none of them mention if the new monsters are any good or not. That's why I'm going to see this movie, because I like cool monsters.

  • June 3, 2012, 5:01 p.m. CST

    Will This Be Another LOST Talkback?

    by Crow3711

    Happy day.

  • June 3, 2012, 5:10 p.m. CST

    ice paul

    by faux1975

    Apparently the scariest monster in the movie is the script. I hear it's the smoke monster quality.

  • June 3, 2012, 5:11 p.m. CST

    Alien³ was boring.

    by Mawazi

    It's right up there with Phantom Menace. How could they possibly have made a boring Star Wars movie? Or a boring Alien movie? They managed it, somehow. Haven't seen Prometheus, yet. Hopefully it is not a snooze fest. If it is truly Star Trek with a bit more of an edge, that might not be so bad, as far as I'm concerned. Just don't put me to sleep.

  • June 3, 2012, 5:18 p.m. CST

    This film should have been released 2 weeks ago

    by cgih8r

    We know everything now

  • The legacy of 'Lost' is how difficult it is to not disappoint viewers with that writing strategy. Fringe built up to an amazing season 3 and then pissed it away with season 4. K

  • June 3, 2012, 5:25 p.m. CST

    What I want to know is...

    by fauns_bass_1

    This trend with prequels... Did this begin with Star Wars Phantom M-anus? Or are there other examples before this? I can't think of any. I really don't understand the need to go back and explain away the sense of mystery set up by the original classic movie. The Space Jockey didn't need to be explained. That was what made Alien so marvellous... it left so much to the imagination. When I watch Alien now i'll find it hard to shake that the SJ is actually a blue 8ft male "real doll".

  • June 3, 2012, 5:26 p.m. CST

    PROMETHEUS does not exist in this dojo

    by Cobra--Kai

    The Dojo's PROMETHEUS REVIEW. 100% Safe and Spoiler Free. I went into PROMETHEUS having *mostly* steered clear of the spoilers from these last weeks and im certainly not going to be an asshole and spoil anything here. If you just want to know *how good is PROMETHEUS* the answer is - it's very good indeed. Four stars out of five from the Dojo. From the opening establishing shots, which rival anything you'll see on PLANET EARTH or any other high def nature docu it is clear that Ridley Scott has lost none of his flair for putting beautiful imagery on screen. The guy is a painter as much as a director and in this movie he is served by cutting edge CG FX allied with some massive and detailed sets. The film looks fantastic, with enough sleekness in the spaceship interiors and the wetsuit style spacesuits to differentiate it from his past work with ALIEN. Any fan of film should see this simply for the visuals. The characters aren't as subtle and naturalistic as in ALIEN, but not quite as broad brush stroke as ALIENS - somewhere in the middle. And while the ensemble is perhaps a little large to get to know all of them, there are some standouts. Idris Elba is good as the captain and Noomi as Shaw grows in stature and confidence as the film unfolds (her boyfriend Holloway is sadly a weak link, and seems to go from leader to surly partway through inexplicably - perhaps a scene has been cut?). Charlize in her figure hugging catsuits is memorable and you do get a tantalising glimpse of butt, just where the booty and thigh meet that will definitely be worth a freeze frame on blu! However it's Michael Fassbender's movie imho. His David is quite something and he comfortably steals every scene he is in. There is a sequence near the start of the film where only David is awake on the vessel, which recalls SILENT RUNNING and THE OMEGA MAN. It's feels the most pure sci-fi stretch of the whole film, and I think I could have happily watched a whole movie about the David character. For those worried about the rating, and about PROMETHEUS not being grown up enough - I can set your fears at rest. There are parts that will make adult audiences squirm and while the gore is never over done, it doesn't feel like anything has been compromised in this regard. Im looking forward to discussing the finer plot points in more detail - although im not going to do that here. I did find myself coming out of the film with a few question marks and asking questions to those disciples of the Dojo who saw it with me and no one really being able to answer. I don't think a film has to spell out every event and perhaps a few little things being open to interpretation is quite cool. The one major negative I would say is that PROMETHEUS isn't much of a crowd pleaser. Those hoping for a *get away from her you bitch!* moment or something to whoop or cheer at may be disappointed. It also lacks the inexorable forward momentum of both ALIEN and ALIENS, instead opting for a slightly more rambling plot. But ultimately this is a big, beautiful and smart sci-fi, which stands alone from the rest of the ALIEN franchise. I very much hope that the PROMETHEUS franchise continues, i've only just seen this one but already i'd love to see another!

  • June 3, 2012, 5:27 p.m. CST

    Goddamnit.

    by SebastianHaff

    I already have my IMAX tickets, and I'm staying optimistic, but this pisses me off. <br><p> I seriously doubt Prometheus is going to make enough for a sequel. So now the ideas the screenwriter is clearly more interested in are never going to be brought to light. <br><p> I know it's popular these days, but I hate this 'string 'em along' kind of storytelling we have now. Everything's either exposition or a setup for next time. Fuck off with that. Just tell me the best story you can come up with RIGHT NOW. If you need one 'okay' two and a half hour movie before you can get to the good stuff, you're doing something fucking wrong.

  • June 3, 2012, 5:34 p.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    Fatboy, did you like the film? Im not advocating aicn goes over to a star rating system but in this particular review you dont indicate like or disdain. How would you rate it?

  • June 3, 2012, 5:35 p.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    sebastianhaff, you must have REALLY hated EMPIRE STRIKES BACK.

  • June 3, 2012, 5:40 p.m. CST

    Question for Blade Runner fans...

    by Tim

    I've never seen it...would you recommend I watch the original or the 'Final Cut'?

  • June 3, 2012, 5:50 p.m. CST

    @rawbeatsdotcom

    by fauns_bass_1

    I love the original but I prefer the final cut. The changes in the final cut are subtle. No glaringly obvious CGI.

  • June 3, 2012, 5:51 p.m. CST

    If someone had told me a year ago...

    by LowDevil

    that Avengers with Whedon would be much better received than a Scott Prometheus, I would have punched that person out and then piss on him. Wow would i have been wrong. I am so disappointed, that i can not think of any words. Wanted this to change everything so badly. Wonder if my hunch about Nolan's 3rd film also disappointing will be true? From the best summer of all time, to the summer of the Avengers only.

  • June 3, 2012, 5:51 p.m. CST

    See the Final Cut of Blade Runner, therawbeatsdotcom

    by DeckardB26354

    it is better, in no small part because it removes the awful narration of the original (but the 90's Director's Cut also does that). Basically the Final Cut is just a spruced up version of the Director's Cut.

  • June 3, 2012, 5:55 p.m. CST

    @rawbeatsdotcom

    by fauns_bass_1

    Watch Blade Runner soon though before the sequel arrives... I imagine that'll spoil any questions raised by the movie that are still open to debate ;)

  • June 3, 2012, 5:56 p.m. CST

    For every infantile viewer who wanted Alien3 to be Aliens 2

    by gaygoonie

    Go revisit the film. It's quite bold in the ways it aggressively seeks to NOT please. This is why Fincher is the more interesting filmmaker. The guy loves to make his audience twitch in discomfort and not just give them what they want. (Cameron is a total populist pleaser). But seriously, Alien 3 dared to not repeat, especially in its brave final moments. It deserves credit for that.

  • June 3, 2012, 5:59 p.m. CST

    cobra--kai

    by Ice Paul

    Are the monsters/creatures/aliens in it good? Nobody mentions these in any reviews, so I figure something is up... does it spoil it in some way to mention them or are they just not that interesting?

  • June 3, 2012, 6:05 p.m. CST

    So if I write a positive review, will you publish it?

    by catlettuce4

  • This is a movie attempting to be intelligent scifi but failing badly because its centered on delivering great visuals over a decent plot. Ridley Scott has finally Lucas'd the Alien franchise. Way too many contrived storytelling in the vein of a teen horror film. Characters just deciding to do the utter ridiculous choice over the common sense one so they can die! The last surviving characters choice of the most mind boggling of them all. Makes no sense on any level other than to start another franchise for hollywood.

  • June 3, 2012, 6:07 p.m. CST

    icepaul

    by catlettuce4

    the new "monsters" are basically big bald humans - think Lurch without hair or eyebrow. Honest, that's it

  • June 3, 2012, 6:08 p.m. CST

    Final cut it is then, thanks

    by Tim

  • June 3, 2012, 6:08 p.m. CST

    Regan

    by Jaymie69

    Its not just me is it..I feel like I've been hijacked and robbed. Fox ... You thieves

  • June 3, 2012, 6:12 p.m. CST

    Ceejaynightwing

    by HEADGEEK

    Actually, I swear it looked like there were multiple pods and the person that gets in one chooses the middle one.

  • June 3, 2012, 6:22 p.m. CST

    WHO THE FUCK DO CHANNEL 4 THINK THEY ARE?

    by pubgrundy

    WHO THE FUCK DO CHANNEL 4 THINK THEY ARE? When a broadcasting company buys the right to televise a movie do they also buy the right to chop it up into an absolute mess too? District 9 was on Channel 4 this evening and I've just come online to find out if other people are as mad as I am . They seem to have randomly cut out several scenes and moments seemingly completely at random. At first i thought i was blinking veeeeery slowly as i could have sworn i missed several bits but then it dawned on me that some cunt at channel 4 had randomly cut MANY violent scenes and moments from the movie. I checked my watch... yup... it is 10.20. Well over an hour past the watershed. All the bad language was left intact, any many violent scenes were too. but somehow many of them had just randomly been cut. the funniest bit in the movie was excised (if you've seen it you know its punctuated with the word "FUCK!") and the whole seige scene ended up being "dudes blow up wall, walk into lab, get shot at, hide behind some lab equipment, steal a container and run away."..... where the fuck were the exploding Afrikaners? why were some exploding dudes removed from the movie whilst others left in? And the deaths of the 2 bad dudes edited down to next-to-nothing? whats with the inconsistency? WHO THE FUCK DO CHANNEL 4 THINK THEY ARE? If they show a 15 rated film past watershed they have no right to edit it. if they own the rights to broadcast ANY film that has material that is deemed not suitable for pre-watershed, they have no right to edit it so that they can show it pre-watershed. they are fucking with art here! and most importantly they are Censoring the artists and telling us as adults that we can only watch what they deem suitable. I am an adult Channel 4, i'll watch what i want... which from now on will not be movies on your shitty channel. I'll stick to netflix and lovefilm. At least they have a sense of pride in the great movies they have available. Shame on you Ch4! District 9 is the most important science fiction film of at least the last twenty years. you did it, and your viewers a major disservice tonight.

  • June 3, 2012, 6:25 p.m. CST

    Harry...

    by vettebro

    We all know who gets in the middle pod from the trailers. It's not a mystery... : )

  • June 3, 2012, 6:26 p.m. CST

    Mark Kermode likes it, 7.5/10

    by grev

    If it was a bad as a lot of geeks are complaining about he'd have given it both barrels. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4jyxZBuWSXM

  • June 3, 2012, 6:29 p.m. CST

    I'm still going to see this, but...

    by vettebro

    Based on all the reviews and talkbacks I've read, I'm going to be very disappointed. If this is no better than Alien 3, then this movie is going to suck. Alien 3 was boring and sub standard. Alien 4 was comical. AvP was better than A3 or A4 in my opinion, but not in the same class as Alien or Aliens for that matter. : (

  • June 3, 2012, 6:32 p.m. CST

    Yes Fassbender was really good as usual

    by Jaymie69

    But David 8 was the only compelling object in this thing. He could have been well played by a number of great actors but it's not enough to stop Prometheus being a pretentious , insulting, B movie wannabe.

  • June 3, 2012, 6:35 p.m. CST

    Captain Janek......a take on Captain Janks, perhaps?

    by Punisherthunder

  • June 3, 2012, 6:36 p.m. CST

    Alien 3 is a masterpiece compared to Prometheus

    by kwisatzhaderach

    The 'narrative' of Prometheus is, frankly, shocking. Lindelof is laughing all the way to the bank.

  • June 3, 2012, 6:38 p.m. CST

    catlettuce4

    by Ice Paul

    Ok, I know the Space Jockeys are big humans, but in the trailers we saw... *spoilers for those who didn't even watch the trailers* ...a snake thing, a slimy-squiggler that gets cut out of Noomi, something with lots of tentacles fighting one of the big humans... But no one has really commented on any of these things who has actually seen the movie.

  • June 3, 2012, 6:41 p.m. CST

    Obvious late rewrites...

    by AnarchyWorldsEnd

    The planet they were on was originally going to be LV-426 from Aliens. That final engineer chest burster WAS to be the Space Jockey burster from Alien. Somebody at FOX along with the other creative people thought they had a franchise on their hands and somewhere along the line made the utterly transparent decision to leave the door open for sequels. Think about that when people are praising the "vision" of this drivel. It's a worse cash in than AVP. At least we all knew PW Anderson was shit. This is riding Ridley's coat tails and masquerading as a good film which it most certainly isn't.

  • June 3, 2012, 6:42 p.m. CST

    cgih8r...

    by vettebro

    We are all entitled to our opinions.

  • June 3, 2012, 6:53 p.m. CST

    Movie taste validation...

    by vettebro

    My top 5 favorite movies: #1. Shawshank Redemption #2. Raiders of the Lost Ark #3. Jaws #4. Star Wars (original) #5. A Few Good Men I would love to read your top 5.

  • I think the Alien franchise is well and truely finished in terms of being able to mine anything different from the concept. The reason why Aliens succeeded is because it ignored Scott's haunted house in space and became an action adventure. Cameron saw the potential for a military response to the aliens. After the studio execs fucked up three like they did with the Spiderman trilogy they should have just called it quits. It has been a a lesson in deminishng returns ever since. Once they let Paul Thomas Anderson loose on the franchise, albeit a mash up, it completely destroyed that universe. Scott doesn't have anything to prove; he has made at least three all time classics (Alien, Blade Runner, Gladiator), but his films are no longer an event . I didn't expect anything from this and from what I have read I was right. I'll still see it though.

  • June 3, 2012, 6:54 p.m. CST

    gaygoonie

    by Mako

    I'm partially in agreement with you. I love FINCHER. And I agree that he wants the audience to squirm and not feel comfortable all the time. Some of my favorite films are FINCHER movies. And as much as I believe ALIEN3 was shot well. Had the right tone. Interesting characters. And finished Ripley's story - the one thing I just can't forgive it for is killing Newt and Hicks. It was way too convenient. What would have been more daring was to kill off Ripley and keep Newt and Hicks alive (like a previous screenplay had done). Cameron has become more and more the populist director. But I firmly believe he created one of the best sequels in history in ALIENS. He didn't copy the formula Scott set up. He changed direction too. In fact... you could say Fincher just copied Scott for ALIEN3 and Cameron was the one who took a chance that could have took a nose dive if it didn't come out well.

  • June 3, 2012, 7:05 p.m. CST

    @papabendi

    by Derrida77

    I believe you mean Paul W.S. Anderson

  • CALLED IT!!!! I bet it would have been awesome HAD WE NOT HAD POSTS, REVIEWS, SPOILER INFO, TRAILERS FOR TRAILERS and worst of all EVERY FRICKEN FANBOY WITH HIS NOSE UP RIDLEYS ASS SPOUTING OFF HOW AMAZING THIS WOULD BE!!!! DARK KNIGHT RISES FOR LIFE!!!!!!! that is all.

  • June 3, 2012, 7:14 p.m. CST

    ALIEN VS PREDATOR could have been...

    by AnarchyWorldsEnd

    An excellent (if simplistic) action flick had they used the original script that followed the Dark Horse comics. Paul W Suck felt the need to add his own revisionist human history BS just l;ike the Lost guy did with this drivel.

  • June 3, 2012, 7:15 p.m. CST

    Finally, a 100% spot on review.

    by cool_britannia79

    Fatboy Roberts, you just became the best reviewer at AICN. Almost every criticism I've levelled at it is covered, apologists be damned, just because you can see the emperors clothes doesn't mean the rest of us are idiots.

  • June 3, 2012, 7:21 p.m. CST

    ice paul - the monsters (SPOILERS)

    by cool_britannia79

    aren't commented on because they're not really in it. the snakes are in it for about 30 seconds, long enough to attack and NEXT SCENE. the squid is seen being removed from Noomi and apparently dies. we next see it right at the end as Noomi opens the door and it body hugs the engineer and dies. total screentime, maybe 2 minutes tops. the infected fifield has a great entrance, but dies a minute later never getting past the cargo bay. the infected holloway doesn't get that far. honestly, there's maybe 5 minutes of monsters in the whole movie, and each one being unrelated to the other is nonsensical.

  • June 3, 2012, 7:23 p.m. CST

    @derrida77

    by papabendi

    Yes.

  • It was just unnecessarily bleak. I like doom and gloom as much as the next guy, but the beginning of the film and the ridiculous chest burster at the end pretty much ruined the experience. I understand the love of David Fincher, but as an Alien film, I have always found Alien 3 difficult to watch.

  • June 3, 2012, 7:35 p.m. CST

    monsters continued

    by cool_britannia79

    Also, the space jockeys are way smaller than they are in Alien, the size difference was jarring to me. The protoxeno at the end was awful. It was a tacked on scene, and the xenomorph posing for the audience was almost worse than the fact it was born fully formed, it didn't chest burst, it split the Engineer apart head to toe.

  • In my opinion it's better than Gladiator.

  • June 3, 2012, 7:44 p.m. CST

    WOW, people really don't like this movie

    by CountryBoy

    I'm honestly surprised. Last I checked it was around 80% on RT... are those critics just after something different? Is there some fanboy factor that makes talkbackers so unhappy with PROMETHEUS? Interesting...

  • June 3, 2012, 7:50 p.m. CST

    vettebro

    by faux1975

    Empire Strikes Back is the PERFECT Star Wars film so it must be ahead of A New Hope. Your list is pretty good overall.

  • June 3, 2012, 7:51 p.m. CST

    I think the reviewers are embargoed

    by wadi77

    If you post negative reviews you'll get a letter from Fox, but if it's positive they actually won't do anything I guess. I expect more negative reviews after June 7.

  • June 3, 2012, 7:54 p.m. CST

    Empire Stikes Back = Top 5 greatest film EVER

    by faux1975

    Yes, I actually believe Empire is in the top 5 greatest films ever made. The movie is flawless in so many ways. Every part of Empire is done to perfection including one of the greatest John William scores ever. When it comes to anything Sci Fi or fantasy, It starts with Empire. That is the measuring stick for me. Yes, the same Empire that Lucas HATES. Go figure.

  • June 3, 2012, 7:55 p.m. CST

    Waddi77, i agree completely!

    by pubgrundy

    in fact i think kindom of heavens directors cut is up there with alien as being scotts best movie. its a travesty that so many people will never give it a chance due to what the studio did to the theatrical cut. Kingdom of Heaven: Directors Cut is an absolute masterpiece and blows every other historical epic (even Ben-Hur) out of the water. and that it cost so much less to make than the pedestrian Robin-Hood just baffles me! everyone who enjoys film should seek it out on blu-ray. its just stunning.

  • June 3, 2012, 7:57 p.m. CST

    cool_britannia79 - monsters

    by Ice Paul

    Thanks for the info, appreciated... That's disappointing and I'm surprised none of the reviewers go into that, even if just to say something like, "if you were waiting for a monster as cool as the original alien, then there isn't one." *spoilers* So we basically have humanoid guys (boring), a snake thing (ok I guess), a squid that turns into a bigger squid? (kinda not very imaginative), and then an early version of a xenomorph (yawn)... Mmm, I had been holding out hope that even if the critics didn't really dig the characters, plot, etc. at least there would be some epic monster stuff going down, so now at least this info has leveled out my enthusiasm...

  • June 3, 2012, 7:58 p.m. CST

    faux1975...

    by vettebro

    I thought about that. I really did. ESB didn't make the top 5 because I didn't want to give that much credit to Lucas. A New Hope got the tick because it was the one that started it all. It was a game changer. ESB is in my all time top 10 for sure. : )

  • Dallas going into the air ducts alone with a flamethrower is one of the fucking DUMBEST things they could have done. The difference is that the movie is good enough that you forgive it. I hope that Prometheus is the same way.

  • June 3, 2012, 7:58 p.m. CST

    RT reviews

    by cool_britannia79

    the 80% is the ridiculous split of positive to negative reviews. There are 3 star reviews marked as positive which read quite negative, and vice verse. The critical score is 6.9, which is more accurate. Personally for me It's a 5.5, or 3 star film.

  • June 3, 2012, 7:59 p.m. CST

    I'll still see it but...

    by lead_sharp

    Can't shake the feeling that after Robin *sweet baby jesus what the fuck was Scott thinking* Hood he had to make something that he knew people would like him again for. I'll have to see the thing to see if that was a good idea or not.

  • June 3, 2012, 8 p.m. CST

    I like most people defend Alien3 by insulting others.

    by Steve Smith

    If your strongest argument for something is that everyone else misunderstood it, that says something. If you have to make excuses for why '95%' of Alien fans don't like it, that says something. Alien3 just didn't do it for some people. Maybe it makes you feel better about your tastes to pretend that everyone hated it because it was 'too dark' or depressing (really?), or that you're onto something that everyone else is oblivious to, but get off your high fucking horse. Other irrelevant arguments: production issues. If the film can't stand on its own merits for most, save yourselves the trouble and just eat it. You like Alien3? Great. I never thought it was as bad most people make it out to be, but I'm under no delusions that it was too much for some people. Requiem For A Dream is a movie too bleak for the average popcorn viewer. Alien3 was just poorly executed.

  • June 3, 2012, 8:02 p.m. CST

    @countryboy

    by Jay

    Look at the TBs and IMDB forums for Drive, Tree Of Life, Hugo, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, Cabin In The Woods, etc. You will see the exact same comments and arguments. One glance at the ratings and you would assume most liked the films. One glance at the forums... Most of the insults hurled at those who dare like the movies are interchangeable. There are problems with Prometheus. Nobody is saying otherwise. But the majority of it is exaggerated BS and it's frankly quite laughable.

  • I really hate shows that answer every single question, but I hate more the people who complain that everything is not explained. We saw this for years with X-Files, viewers who just had to know the final answers to problems. They never seemed to realize that questions are far more interesting than answers. Questions allow the imagination to integrate with what the writers and directors show us. Call it a deconstruction of the movie, where the thinking by the viewer is as important as the visual/verbal concepts. Do I want things tied up nicely? Nope, let me think about the movie on my own, no matter how measured or far away from the creator's vision. Give me a broken puzzle to piece together any day--it's far more interesting than a puzzle put together for you by someone else.

  • June 3, 2012, 8:04 p.m. CST

    It's really hard to take Rottentomatoes seriously at this point

    by AlienFanatic

    Only two of the reviews are done by "top" reviewers. Most are from unprofessional websites. Just look over some of them and you'll realize that they're poorly-written and are barely above the level of a Wordpress blog. Seriously, RT will not be even remotely close to accurate until Friday, if then. I have a feeling Ebert won't like it much at all.

  • June 3, 2012, 8:05 p.m. CST

    Wadii77

    by Clio

    Yep, the Director's Cut of Kingdom of Heaven was great, far better than we saw on screen.

  • June 3, 2012, 8:12 p.m. CST

    Requiem For A Dream...

    by vettebro

    Good movie. Very bleak. Jennifer Connelly. "Ass to ass"....hehe...

  • June 3, 2012, 8:13 p.m. CST

    clio, I agree

    by wadi77

    But usually with questions we're given clues and hints, and then it's up to our imagination. They don't need to be answered, but from what I read, the questions brought up in Prometheus weren't even explored?

  • June 3, 2012, 8:17 p.m. CST

    So is that a positive review?

    by ThisBethesdaSea

  • June 3, 2012, 8:23 p.m. CST

    Saw it on Friday...decidedly average

    by UndeadXeke

    ...which for an Alien film from Ridley Scott isn't good enough. It felt like a story that started out as a stand alone sci-fi story set in it's own universe, then someone came along and decided to adapt it to a Space Jockey story in the Alien-universe...in the process they ended up not telling either story particularly well. It was good, not great. Better than Alien 3 and Resurection but doesn't hold a candle to Alien or Aliens.

  • June 3, 2012, 8:24 p.m. CST

    The dialog in Alien 3 was f'n brilliant!

    by Nabakov

    I'm not fucking against the constant fucking use of the the word "fuck," but were there two fucking sentences in a row in fucking "Alien 3" that did not fucking use the fucking word "fuck?" Did the scriptwriter use a random "Insert Fuck" macro in his script formatting program?

  • June 3, 2012, 8:30 p.m. CST

    cuts/late aditions to the film

    by ScaryJim

    My opinion on what changed in the Fox board room. 1)LV-426- It was always going to be LV-426- they changed the planet name and the way the space jockey dies because they remembered FRANCHISE. This must have changed the film thematically for the worse, instead of a massive mythology they only had to tell us what we already knew, because...you know, sequels. 2)Old man Guy Pearce- Absolutely no logic in having a badly made up old man guy pearce (and fucking jarring it was too. Remember how shitty the ape masks had got by 'battle for the planet of the apes'- like that) UNLESS they were going to de-age him. My guess is he was going to find some magic Space Jock DNA stuff that would have made him younger, this would have still been shit. 3) Fucking xenos. The last thing I wanted was for this to in any way be related to alien by way of the Xeno- I thought it was going to actually avoid the slasher trope- i thought the horror was just going to come via the discovery of the civilization. I was just hoping for a return to the great characterization-MAYBE for us to know they'd engineered the Xenos. but Christ, the last shot. Remember in the 80's when someone would bring out a monster movie then a million little studios would basically rip it off with their own shitty version of said monster, ugh, behold your shitty rip off Xeno courtesy of the execs at Fox film. One of my friends facebooked that he enjoyed Prometheus, being the joyful chap i am I smugly listed all the wrongs with it and said if he could ignore them then it was a good movie - he just said :- 'I always thought it would be shit but it was ok' I think that's the secret. somewhere along the line I thought this wasn't going to be a shitty money making scam- they've got a big idea, fuck me, fox is actually going along with it- we're going to get an intelligent, big budget sci fi examining the human condition, with some mysterious Gods and some fab Giger set design . To the people that liked it , I can understand in a way. I watched KNOWING thinking it was going to be utter shite and ended up enjoying it because it's fucking Bonkers and they did some things i didn't think they'd do (amazing plane crash, everyone dying etc...) but it's hardly a classic of the sci fi medium and I wouldn't argue against anyone saying it's utter tripe- That being said when the first few critics said Prometheus was bonkers i sort of thought I'd dig that. I've calmed down alot since I saw it, also i've watched '2001' to reset my barometer. The anger comes from the false advertising alot of people think they fell for- If PW Anderson had directed this i would probably have been thankful it wasn't alot worse but it was fucking Ridley Scott. Also all the big reviewers seem to be reviewing it like it's just a shitty regular horror movie and giving it a pass. Kermode is pretty nonchalant about it. It's like alot of these critics secretly knew beforehand that they weren't going to get 'MOON' they were actually going to get 'Jason in Space' and so they were ok with that.

  • June 3, 2012, 8:50 p.m. CST

    spewbacca

    by ScaryJim

    Less expectation doesn't automatically make something good, it just makes you less disappointed and less likely to waste the best part of 2 days babbling on the internet like a retard baby just because of a film, boo hoo. I'm talking about myself BTW.

  • June 3, 2012, 8:51 p.m. CST

    So we're all going to let Lindelof get away with it - again?

    by MichaelH

    Sheep, lemmings, or cabbages? Can't make up my mind. Lindelof played us for suckers with Lost and we're all just going to let him do it again.

  • Yes, spoilerism.

  • And speaking of Top 5 Movies, the little kid from MOONRISE KINGDOM has his list up over there -- it's almost comically sophisticated and insightful. Everyone's raving about it... Might cheer up depressed PROMETHEUS viewers.

  • June 3, 2012, 9:02 p.m. CST

    This review is spot on.

    by I Hope You Die

    I saw it two days ago and I can't do better than this: "Characters behave erratically, for no evident reason. Events occur, and then escalate, because characters inexplicably refuse to share the important information they do have. Logic will just drop out, like sound on an old, static-filled recording, reappearing just in time to fuel an exposition dump, leading to an intriguing idea, which is then thrillingly exploded – and then abandoned, as Scott turns and moves towards another bright, shiny idea." It's important to emphasise that this has absolutely nothing to do with leaving questions unanswered. It's superficiality vs. depth. There are no answers. It's just a bunch of cool stuff thrown together haphazardly. This seems to be the norm nowadays and a lot of people apparently enjoy it. Maybe it's a generational thing. Maybe movies are no longer windows into semi-coherent possible worlds and are instead now assemblages of imagery from other sources. I don't know. I didn't hate it but it was deeply flawed.

  • June 3, 2012, 9:12 p.m. CST

    So is this a watch Friday night film or wait....

    by Ozman X

    till the weekend?

  • June 3, 2012, 9:18 p.m. CST

    ironhelix: disagree with Dallas being a dumbass

    by Monroville

    Remember, he felt responsible for what was happening (as he pressured Ripley to let them in, as Kane was his friend). Add to that that he has no idea what the Alien was, only that it was big. Even so, they had to do "something", as they already established that they had limited oxygen and food, and would NEVER leave it on the ship while they were in hypersleep. Even then, they at least had Dallas acknowledge that he was in a bad situation and even HE realized that he had to get out. Of course, thanks to Lambert, he gets killed (who if anyone could be found guilty of the stupid factor that gets anyone killed, it's her). _________ Even so, it sounds like Ridley has finally (or officially) sold out, though I kind of figured that with the shitty "director's cut" of ALIEN. (Sigh) Ah well...

  • June 3, 2012, 9:36 p.m. CST

    @ vettebro...that's a respectable list

    by cgih8r

    so I'm baffled why you think AvP is better than Alien 3!!! way to hold your ground tho. My all time top 5 is: 1. Midnight Run 2. Heat 3. Lawrence of Arabia 4. Braveheart 5. Legends of the Fall. But out of the greatest sci-fi popcorn flicks I gotta go with 1. Aliens; 2.Starship Troopers; 3.Robocop; 4.Predator; 5.Empire Strikes Back....they really do deserve their own category. Wanna list your top 5 sci-fi popcorn flicks?

  • to me is Troy dir. cut. He was really good as Paris: great younger brother to Hector & a generally hopelessly romantic & out of his depth Prince of Troy. Kingdom of Heaven very good but loses abit of it's novel value in it's diff. similarities to Gladiator.

  • June 3, 2012, 9:37 p.m. CST

    Thank You scaryjim for noticing the rewrites...

    by AnarchyWorldsEnd

    They not only ripped of (an admittedly shitty) film in AVP but did some SERIOUS last minute jiggering with the script to make this a franchise. Has Tom Rothan's stench all over it.

  • June 3, 2012, 9:43 p.m. CST

    cobra--kai

    by WeylandYutani

    Excellent review. People who write with purpose on these talk threads are few. Thanks for taking the time to clearly state your opinion.

  • To this day I can't believe somebody actually got paid money (nmaybe it was kid's money) to LOWER the BAR after Aliens...Cameron hits a grand slam ..A rousing blockbuster, rollercoaster of a ride...and then some jerk-offs decide to pussyfoot it with some "tonal" crap...They should have took it to the next level..Most likely something on Earth...Instead they sh*tcan it...Complete idiocy...How much did green lantern (green lighter)man get paid for that call?

  • June 3, 2012, 10:12 p.m. CST

    LV-426 is crying in a corner somewhere.

    by peter

  • June 3, 2012, 10:12 p.m. CST

    Alien3

    by Tony Washburn

    I don't dislike it because it's depressing, I don't l

  • June 3, 2012, 10:18 p.m. CST

    Alien3...

    by Tony Washburn

    I don't dislike it because it depressing, I don't like it because it shits all over everything that was good about the previous film. The only thing it lacks is a rape scene of Newt's dead body. Given Fincher's penchant for disgusting graphic sexual violence, I am surprised its not in there. I have never been as pissed when I got out of a film as I was when I got out of that POS. Cartmanez, that would have glorious..

  • June 3, 2012, 10:31 p.m. CST

    Personally, I really liked Alien 3

    by Jaka

    But in comparison to Alien and Aliens I understand why a lot of people don't. For me, it worked. I liked the tone and the relationships between the characters.

  • June 3, 2012, 10:45 p.m. CST

    The assembly cut of Alien³ is not bad.

    by wadi77

  • June 3, 2012, 11:03 p.m. CST

    @monroville I think it was ash's fault...

    by frank

    Lambert lost the signal just before he got waisted. I always thought ash manipulated the machine remotly to see what would happen. Since lambert lead him right into the alien.

  • June 3, 2012, 11:09 p.m. CST

    @destinycaptain I was WAY more pissed at alien 4

    by frank

    I left alien 3 confused and slightly pissed. In 4 when the queen gives "birth" to that white turd of a monster....I never wanted to walk out of a theater so bad as that moment.

  • June 3, 2012, 11:12 p.m. CST

    Yep. I DID hate Alien 4.

    by Jaka

    THAT is the movie that shat all over the entire franchise.

  • June 3, 2012, 11:18 p.m. CST

    If this is Fatboy Robert's application for employment...

    by Jacob Underhill

    ...then hire that man!

  • June 3, 2012, 11:25 p.m. CST

    FUCK ALL OF YOU

    by Koyaanisqatsi

    LOST was brilliant right up to the end. Yeah it got less brilliant in S6 but still far and away better than ANYTHING ELSE on TV at the time. Oh and Prometheus is pretty damn good. If the criticism all boils down to "it's good but not Alien good" (and let's be honest all the complaints DO boil down to exactly that) then what the fuck is the problem? That's what I thought, you fucking chimps.

  • June 3, 2012, 11:35 p.m. CST

    the first two worked for a couple of reasons

    by ThrowMeTheIdol

    They were genre films (horror and action respectively), and they had very relatable characters for an American audience. This new film is about "big questions" and is sleek and vaguely European, which is qualities the third film had. So I dunno. It looks pretty but I'm not expecting a whole lot. Also it has Lindelof writing it, the nearly useless hack of Lost and Cowboys and Aliens.

  • June 3, 2012, 11:49 p.m. CST

    Alien what?

    by Lummox JR

    What is this Alien 3 you speak of? No such movie was ever made, and therefore I didn't spend good money to go see it in a theater just so it could crap all over the only two films in the franchise. If such a movie did exist though and it was that bad, then the comparisons to Prometheus really don't bode well.

  • June 3, 2012, 11:51 p.m. CST

    The Dark Knight comparisions are eerily similar.......

    by faux1975

    Wasn't the same thing said about The Dark Knight script being all over the place? Matter of fact, most people complained that it ended without any definitive answers (which it didn't....Two Face alive or dead debate??). I'm seeing many similarities when it comes the complaints and praises for Prometheus and when TDK first came out. Here are the parallels I speak of: 1.Heath Ledger's Joker stole the show and was brilliant. Fassbender's role as David was brilliant and stole the show. 2. Prometheus is a gorgeous film, great 3-D and with great special effects. The Dark Knight was a gorgeous film taking full advantage of IMAX and had great set pieces/special effects. 3. Some great ideas but the script was generic overall and plot holes started showing up all over the place during the 2nd half of TDK. Many hated the boat scene and thought it ended with no answers and anti climatic. Prometheus has some great ideas but the script is full of plot holes and really starts to fall apart during the 2nd half of the film. Very little answers provided and too many questions. 4. Great cast and well acted in the TDK but some characters were lacking in their development as it became more about the Joker and less about some other key roles. Rachel Dawes was the weak link in the cast with not much to do. Prometheus has a great cast and well acted overall but some of the crew are just card board roles and Theron's Vickers is a bit generic and one dimensional. 5. Many complained that it was too long with some scenes dragging out. Many complain that Prometheus is too short and many scenes are not fleshed out long enough with the main complaint being that the pacing is too fast. Are you starting to see the similarities? For the record, I love TDK and rank it as my top 3 all time comic book film to date. I have yet to see Prometheus but I suspect that this outrage by some is a bit pretentious because they feel they wanted the Alien film we deserve, but it's not the one we need right now. ;)

  • June 4, 2012, midnight CST

    How did Alien 3 crap all over the first two films?

    by Jaka

    I don't get it. Because it's different? I'm really asking genuinely here, so please, no bashing about the head and shoulders. What did Alien 3 do that so badly insults the first two movies. I think I'm going to have to sit down and watch all three tomorrow because I don't remember there being that much of an issue.

  • As if anyone needs to be thinking of how great Lawrence of Arabia is while watching Prometheus, which seems to be a possible crash and burn. As for Peter Weyland, I think he maybe should have been the main character of the film instead of Noomi. A younger Weyland though, played by Pearce as his normal age (see the post I made about it in Harry's *Prometheus is not Alien/Aliens* apology/damage control/article/review).

  • June 4, 2012, 12:04 a.m. CST

    Prometheus vs. Predator

    by ThulsaBoom

    ...I'm there.

  • June 4, 2012, 12:09 a.m. CST

    I am convinced that...

    by Chris Moody

    ...if ALIEN was released today, there would be a handful of loudmouth TBers who would whine about it repeatedly. Seriously. Some TBers mistake their whiny arrogance for "audacity." There was a reason why no one liked them during high school. There was a guy in my high school that everyone made fun of. He always sat alone in classes and during lunch. I always felt sorry for him. One day, I sat next to the guy at lunch and gently tried to start up some conversation. Within a few minutes, he went on some crazy diatribe about how he could play football and basketball better than me if he wanted to. I suddenly realized that some people will be alone in life because they have a pathetic selfish attitude. No one can stand them because of who they are on the inside. This reminds me of some TBers. They think that they are right, everyone else is wrong. They don't allow anyone else the opportunity to have an opinion...and they judge everyone and everything by their own seemingly infallible views. It is a self-centered arrogance. When they see a movie like PROMETHEUS or ALIEN, they would moan and whine about every apparent flaw because they are never wrong. It is okay to dislike a movie...or even feel disappointment about certain elements of it. However, it is ridiculous to dismiss this film as a piece of shit.

  • June 4, 2012, 12:20 a.m. CST

    I kind of think the naming of the movies hurt the sequels

    by MJDeViant

    I really don't think the other movies are in the same vein as Alien at all. Aliens is way more action and bravado. Alien 3 is a depressing slow burn. Resurrection is a weird "What if" movie. So, in a way, I think Prometheus will be fine (I get to see it sooner than most in US hopefully due to my newly landed night job at a theater). Alll the sequels sort of go out of bounds. I know time-wise and like Newt and stuff it ties together but tonally none of them are like Alien. Again, that's why I'm hoping this is a big sci-fi epic which HAPPENS to involve that universe. With the dreck I see I can't see myself being too disappointed with Prometheus. If so, I will totally call it out.

  • June 4, 2012, 12:21 a.m. CST

    Here's how

    by Lummox JR

    Simple, jaka. Let us say, hypothetically, that the Alien Movie That Shall Remain Unnamed had in fact been made, and that it opened up right from the outset by killing pretty much everyone who survived Aliens, a film that is acknowledged far and wide as extraordinarily well-executed and balls-to-the-wall awesome. The stakes matter, because if such a movie exists, then everything that was fought for in Aliens becomes absolutely meaningless. The only positive outcome from that film then is the destruction of the site at LV-426, which would itself not have achieved the full desired outcome if some of the aliens from that site survived. And a movie with great characterization and action, tight dialogue, excellent score, and just about every other complement that you can throw at it--everything about that movie is reduced to nothing, and the only character to emerge unscathed is the cat.

  • June 4, 2012, 12:22 a.m. CST

    Here's an idea

    by heyoucantlaughatthat

    Forget the hype and the hate and go see it for yourself. It's pointless to make these grandiose, definitive, final, "well-informed" speculative declarations no matter how many vague early mixed reviews you've read that enforce what YOU ALWAYS KNEW the movie was going to be like. Every person who typed a single word on this page is going to see this movie no matter what rotten tomatoes or fatboy roberts said.

  • June 4, 2012, 12:28 a.m. CST

    spewbacca -- crying in a corner

    by lv_426

    Not exactly. I haven't seen Prometheus yet, but I'm already simultaneously lowering my expectations into the gutter while trying to figure out how the Alien/Aliens franchise could be fully rebooted. I shit you not. I did not stutter. Full. Fucking. Reboot. Don't get me wrong, I love Sigourney's iconic sci-fi bad ass known as Ellen Ripley... but that saga is over. Any chance for Siggy to return as Ripley for an Alien 5 has long since passed us by. Hicks, Newt, and Bishop are dead. It is what it is. AvP had potential, but they fucked that one up. Keep the Aliens and Predators separate. They tried, it didn't work, so be it. Now we have Prometheus, which seems as if it should have been its own beast completely separate from the aliens and space jockeys and W-Y. Now, maybe I'll be able to set my expectations low enough by next Friday to enjoy Prometheus? I hope so. If Prometheus still disappoints me, then I'll have at least formulated a contingency plan for how the Alien saga can maybe regain its glory. Right now it is still in the early stages. Right now I'm thinking take FTL out of the Alien series. The focus needs to go back to relatable blue collar pioneers of the outer frontiers of space. I think terraforming colonies sent out via massive generation ships would bring a new and unique angle to the Alien series. Giger needs to come back and design some shocking new biomechanoids. There also needs to be a return to the gritty industrial feel of the first two Alien films. The android angle needs a revamp. I'm thinking they could be a new class that has just recently gained their freedom, but are still sort of treated as second class citizens by regular humans. These are just some random thoughts and early musings. It may sound harsh, but I give a shit about the Alien saga, and it may just be that it could be so much more than the cynical crossovers and retreads we've been getting with this *franchise* since Alien Resurrection reared its funky semi-retarded albino poop Newborn head.

  • June 4, 2012, 12:31 a.m. CST

    seems like a lot of "fanboys" were expecting another sci-fi masterpiece from the master

    by WINONA_RYDERS_PUSSY_JUICE

    Of course there's disappointment. Scott hasn't made a masterpiece in over a decade. When was Gladiator released? It still has almost 80% at Rottentomatoes so how bad can it be.

  • June 4, 2012, 12:43 a.m. CST

    therawbeatsdotcom

    by pax256

    European Theatrical cut works best for me. And Blade Runner is still my #1 fav movie. I think if Scott had done a plodding storyline like Alien people would have been bored. If he had done Aliens he would just be another kinetic modern day director making a forgettable summer crapfest. I dont think anyone should judge this before they see it 2-3 times and maybe before they get a dir's cut bluray. I thought Kingdom of Heaven merely ok until the dir's cut. Now its a great film.

  • June 4, 2012, 12:47 a.m. CST

    lv_426

    by faux1975

    I'm digging your style and couldn't agree more. Alien and Aliens are in my top 20 all time favorite films for a darn good reason and they will never fall out of my top 20. They are almost perfect Sci Fi films. But after than, it's ALL GARBAGE. If Prometheus is at least better than the GARBAGE that followed Aliens, then I will be happy. But if this is comparable to any of those 4 pieces of trash films that followed Aliens, Prometheus will never be watched by me again. I've had it with crappy big budget Sci Fi flops. I just went back to read Harry's Phantom Menace review and I actually felt dirty after reading it. That's how much of a pathetic read it is. I really hope Harry's review is not another Phantom Menace is great review again with a big side of FAN BOY gushing within that review. I want quality, adult Sci Fi with realistic horror as the underlying theme. I'm tired of 90% of the crap anymore. Hollywood sucks.....

  • ...it was doomed from the beginning and you only have yourselves to blame. Couldn't leave well enough alone, you all HAD to search and scour the interweb for every little tid-bit of info up to the point where you all started to hypothesis on the who, what, why's and where's would be in the film. I will still see this, I'm going in with LESS then high expectations but always was going to anyway. I'm sure I'll enjoy it. But as for the EPIC that all the bullshit fanboys were yelling this would be for months now, well, you can all kiss my ass. You get what you deserved. Tough shit. No sympathy from me.

  • June 4, 2012, 12:51 a.m. CST

    Ugh--what a terribly written review...

    by Fred

    I can't believe you guys are digging on what this cat has written. It's just awful. Get a copy of Strunk and White and go to town man. Seriously.

  • June 4, 2012, 12:56 a.m. CST

    lummox jr has a point concerning Alien 3

    by lv_426

    For example, let's say in T2 Sarah Connor is taking a shit in her cell at the nuthouse, and a terminator time travels right into the cell and strangles her to death. Then this bad terminator steals Dr. Silberman's car and goes to the foster home where John Connor lives. The terminator walks up the driveway, kicks the door down, walks into the house to find John talking a dump in the powder room. Terminator pulls out a mini gun and blasts poor young John Connor into pulp. This all happens during the opening credits sequence, just to be clear. Then Arnold's protector terminator character shows up, discovers that his mission is pretty much fucked. So he decides to contact Miles Dyson as a last resort to maybe stop SKYNET from being made in the first place. The movie then becomes the adventures of Arnie the Terminator and Miles Dyson. An extreme example, but maybe sorta how some fans of Alien and Aliens feel about Alien 3.

  • June 4, 2012, 1:10 a.m. CST

    This Review

    by SamBlackChvrch21

    is how I felt about Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen

  • June 4, 2012, 1:18 a.m. CST

    @headgeek - Th

    by CeejayNightwing

  • The defence that it's 'visually stunning' isn't enough. That's just a sign of the lowered expectations audiences have these days. The film is insultingly stupid. Transformers 3 was visually stunning too remember. Now i'm not saying that Prometheus is that bad but it's not a good enough defence of a film. In truth, Prometheus isn't even that remarkable visually, certainly not by Scott's usual high standards. I'm struggling to recall any particularly memorable images that can't be seen in any other big budget sci-fi, or have been done better by Scott himself. Y'know what? I'm just gonna stop talking about it. Fuck it.

  • June 4, 2012, 1:30 a.m. CST

    I've seen PROMETHEUS, and...

    by Sir Loin

    SPOILERS It borrows heavily from AVP, right down to ancient temples/statues of the gods/crew separation/Weyland in charge/alien artifacts/hieroglyphs/etc. etc. It also borrows heavily from EVENT HORIZON, as others have observed. In other words, almost NOTHING original. There's no tension. No scares. No dread. You've seen it all before. Such a complete waste, and I actually saw ALIEN back in 1979 in the theater. Why, oh WHY did Ridley need to explain the space jockey, who is just a humanoid in a SUIT?! FAIL. Just UTTER FAIL. Lindelof shares the blame, that guy is utterly incapably of creating any kind of big reveal. His escape is simply to create more questions. The finest hackery at present. Save your money (and expectations) by waiting for the Blu-ray.

  • I counted at least 15 people on board, nearly twice what the useless ejector pods can cater for and way more than what the lifeboat can sustain. For anyone to go on that mission they'd had to accept that a whole bunch of them have to die in order to escape any hazardous situations that result them abandoning the ship. Who in the world would go on a two year mission to an alien planet on those terms no matter how much the cash? This is a worse situation than Titanic and these scientists are meant to be intelligent! So as seen in the stupid ending, Shaw tells the pilot to crash the ship and he tells everyone in the cockpit to get to eject pods (that just sends them to the planet surface) and ejects the lifeboat to the surface...? WTF? Then his copilot and Navigator decide they'd rather die with him so stay on the ship cracking jokes (are these guys up to speed with what's going on, why would they just want to die happily?) So after Vickers dies running in a straight line to where the alien ship was falling rather than away from it (Stupid) they wipe out all the crew that would ruin their screenplay that's contrived to have Shaw make the improbable decision to steal another gigantic Alien ship (the audience conveniently knew nothing about until the end) and go searching for more Aliens that want to wipe out humanity rather than go home for medical assistance and to warn the authorities of our impending doom. How else would they set up Prometheus 2? (..or why does there fraking need to be another one) Even more stupid, If these Aliens were still alive then Earth would have been wiped out a long time ago. If they're just sleeping last this alien was, then why would you want to wake him up and have him beat the crap out of you like Hulk did to Loki, then continue with their plans to exterminate Earth? The last attempt at that resulted in everyone she knew being killed in less than 30 seconds! She doesn't speak their language, only the Android does and whatever he said to the last Alien nobody knows because there were no subtitles! He could have dissed his mother or football team for all we know! Contrived Hollywood franchise bollocks!

  • Not a good sign. The film hasn't even opened theatrically in the US yet.

  • June 4, 2012, 1:48 a.m. CST

    RE: Cobra--Kai, How would I rate it?

    by Fatboy Roberts

    If I had to use a star scale: 2 1/2 out of 5. If I had to rank the films in order, I'd go ALIEN, ALIENS (sizable gap) ALIEN3, PROMETHEUS (vast chasm) Alien: Resurrection. That said - I didn't write the review to try and deter people from seeing it, because I feel even the people who will come away from the film disappointed (or even VERY disappointed) will find quite a few things to talk about, and those discussions will probably be pretty damned interesting. If I didn't indicate like or disdain, it's because my appreciation of it didn't spike too high, and my problems never quite dipped into something as severe as disdain. It's a broken puzzle, much like ALIEN3 was. And to clarify: I like ALIEN3. But that movie only works if you can forgive it for beginning with not only the death of the "family" Ripley just fought so hard for, but a situation that couldn't possibly have happened anywhere during the last reel of ALIENS. It starts THAT broken, and continues from there, glimmering brightly from time to time, achieving coherence frequently enough for its ending to matter -but ONLY if you're willing to accept that beginning.

  • June 4, 2012, 1:53 a.m. CST

    @lummoxjr

    by veebeeyes

    ...I see your point. But realize that Ripley's primary goal in Aliens was TO WIPE OUT THE ALIENS. At the end of the movie, she was even willing to suck the kid out into space if it meant killing the Aliens. Bottom line is that Newt and Hicks were secondary concerns the entire time. And yes, the mere existence of Alien 3 DOES show that Ripley failed in Aliens. However, by the end of Alien 3 she DOES succeed in killing the last of the Aliens. So...mission accomplished, I guess. It just took one extra movie. Anyway, Alien 3 certainly has its share of flaws. That being said, I don't see how it renders Aliens "pointless".

  • June 4, 2012, 2 a.m. CST

    And the Alien franchise SHOULDN'T be rebooted.

    by veebeeyes

    Yes, the character arcs have all run their course, the saga is over. The ONLY reason for more reboots and sequels (aside from a possible full-blown Earth War, which I'd only reluctantly support due to its potential to be incredibly badass) is to see more of the Aliens. And as far as that goes, I honestly think that they've just lost too much of their impact. They've been too oversaturated by the media, they've ceased to be mysterious or creepy, and they just plain aren't scary any more. If anyone's considering a reboot, the better option is to just come up with a NEW sci-fi/horror franchise that isn't tied down to the baggage of the Alien series. Aliens are done. They've had their time and for a while it was simply WONDERFUL, but I think it's time to move on. We don't need any sequels, we don't need prequels, and we don't need a reboot.

  • June 4, 2012, 2:40 a.m. CST

    That's the ONLY reason she went back to LV-426.

    by veebeeyes

    Don't you remember how fucking terrified she was, and how she insisted that she was NEVER going back there? And then how she agree to go back, on the SOLE condition that the purpose of the mission was to wipe the Aliens out? Am I the only one here who remembers how Ripley nearly sucked the damn kid out into the vaccum of space, in order to kill off the last Alien? Sure, Bishop grabbed the kid, but Ripley had no way of knowing that he would have been able to do so (epecially since at that point he'd been torn in half and was nothing more than a torso). Yes, Ripley was ABSOLUTELY willing to kill Newt, Hicks, and Bishop, just to make sure that the Aliens are utterly wiped out. Newt and Hicks were ALWAYS secondary concerns. Not just to the writers, but to RIPLEY HERSELF. For as much as people claim to love Aliens, it's surprising how little attention some people actually paid to it. The point is that she can't bear knowing that those things are still alive. The whole "happy family" ending of Aliens is only partly about her relationship with Hicks and Newt. That happy ending and the "yes, you can sleep" stuff is PRIMARILY about the fact that (as far as she knew) the Aliens were all dead. Again, remember...just mere minutes before we get that happy ending, Ripley came DAMN close to killing every singly person on the Sulaco. She was ABSOLUTELY willing to kill Newt and Hicks in order to make sure that the Aliens are dead too, and that's very nearly exact what she did. The second she opened that airlock, she was making a deliberate decision to kill every survivor (including herself).

  • June 4, 2012, 2:55 a.m. CST

    Phantom Menace, Crystal Skull and now Prometheus.

    by 5secondfuse

    It'll never be a Phantom Menace type letdown, that movie is simply lightyears of a letdown over ANYTHING else. It's on the same level as Crystal Skull for me. A master returns to a genre we all love only to discover he just hasn't got it anymore in these studio $$$$$$ obsessed times. Is this really the movie Scott planned to make? How in the fucking hell did some useless up his own ass pretentious tosser from Lost get screenwriting duties? Lost is shit quite frankly and it's all over this movie like a bad smell. The classic AMAZING trailer BAD Movie condition strikes again. The ONLY good character in the whole movie is Fassbender! The 1st hour is sooooooooo slow. The pacing is all over the place. Ridley Scott said he was going to terrify audiences again ' like Alien '. This movie isn't remotely scary. The best part of the whole movie is the part where Fifield turns up outside the ship but it is way too rushed to have any impact. The ending is so rushed it would make Usain Bolt break out into a sweat! The 'Fanboy' ending probably was a condition that Ridley had to put in the movie to get the funding he wanted, or the rating. It's just shit. The sad thing is that the movie promised so much and totally failed to deliver. I had to sit through yet another shitty Spiderman trailer and a whole 10 minute scene preview of Spiderman for some ungodly reason just to watch Prometheus. Up next is Batman. Will Nolan make a great movie because that main trailer was boring as all hell.

  • June 4, 2012, 3:14 a.m. CST

    Rumors of a Blade Runner 2

    by SunTzu77

    Ridley, please don't.... go do something new and never work with Lindelof again.

  • June 4, 2012, 3:15 a.m. CST

    Alien 3 is a class movie with a terrible ending.

    by 5secondfuse

    It is bleak and depressing I'll give it that. It's set in a prison which will always be bleak and depressing. The CGI on the Alien in the chase sequence has dated badly but close up shots on it throughout the movie are great. The acting in it and some of the characters are great and Weaver herself is amazing. Alot of the scenes are simply superb. The only thing that ruins the movie is the ending.

  • June 4, 2012, 3:15 a.m. CST

    Bladerunner was written off too by fanboys...

    by marineboy

    I think Ridley is two edits away from making a great movie. He'll need to re-dub some of the dialogue tho. Lindelof should never work again.

  • June 4, 2012, 3:22 a.m. CST

    They should have unplugged Fifield on takeoff.

    by Octavian

    Terrible character, terrible actor.

  • June 4, 2012, 3:33 a.m. CST

    veebeeyes -- yeah, we didn't pay attention to Aliens

    by lv_426

    That whole going back into the about-to-explode atmosphere processor to get Newt was just for kicks.

  • June 4, 2012, 4:03 a.m. CST

    "directors getting worse with age"

    by JAMF

    nope, they get less picky with scripts and/or let studios dictate what they want the film to be. except when the director IS the studio (lucas) then yes, he just lost his fucking mind in old age.

  • June 4, 2012, 4:03 a.m. CST

    Quite enjoyable... (spoilers)

    by dj_bollocks

    Just not as enjoyable as I'd hoped... I absolutely hate hate hate that that they felt the need to have Fassbender and Rapace's character fly off into the sunset together "for the franchise"... Particularly after David had just killed your boyfriend after giving him alien DNA which impregnated you to have squid baby... which in turn caused the birth of the xenomorphs... I did come out of the cinema thinking I'd watched something worthy, but in actual fact having watched and read reviews that pointed out a few things, my opinion has soured slightly on the movie. It certainly isn't clear that this is a different planet than in Alien - the average viewer is'nt going to know the difference between the LV's and whilst I had an inkling that 426 wasn't the same - it's certainly not made clear. And as Fatboy has explained so many "Why the fuck are they doing that" moments on reflection that spoil the movie. Good, just not good enough... And this is a pretty good review too... http://www.empireonline.com/reviews/reviewcomplete.asp?FID=137119

  • June 4, 2012, 4:05 a.m. CST

    saw it yesterday and loved it

    by BigDan

    I saw this in Stockholm yesterday and I really loved it. In fact my only complaint is that it needed another hour to get us more invested in the characters which would have made the horror even more gripping and their actions more understandable( I agree with the reviewer that there is a lot of seemingly erractic behaviour). Still Fassbender alone is worth the price of admission and his performance is so strong that he has me longing for something as blasphemous as a Laurence of Arabia remake starring him.

  • June 4, 2012, 4:06 a.m. CST

    grev, mark kermode

    by JAMF

    not only likes the twilight films but the books as well. i wouldn't be surprised if he's right now wanking over christian grey. the stupid hair and the quick-fire talking nonsense 'flappy hands' it's all for effect. he's gotten so much worse since they put a webcam in the radio studio, seriously i barely listen to the guy anymore. his bleating about 3d is pathetic as well.

  • June 4, 2012, 4:20 a.m. CST

    @lv_426

    by OhWhatTheFeckEver

    To be fair, @veebeeyes is talking about a point after the scene you mention. Ripley returns for Newt because she believes the fusion explosion is going to destroy all the aliens. After that, she finds that the queen isn't dead, leading to the scene which veebeeyes is talking about. Despite saving Newt, the nightmare isn't over and she IS willing to sacrifice anybody to destroy that nightmare. Hicks, herself and even the freshly rescued Newt, because she absolutely needs to destroy those creatures and everyone is expendable for that conclusion. I agree with veebeeyes.

  • June 4, 2012, 4:22 a.m. CST

    am i to take it that guy pearce is only in the film

    by JAMF

    in the old age makeup and that the ted conference was basically just shot for the viral ad?? coz that's insane.

  • June 4, 2012, 4:26 a.m. CST

    Answering does not exist in this dojo

    by Cobra--Kai

    Fatboy Roberts, thanks for the response. I think I would agree with your *ordering* of the various ALIEN movies, although I personally enjoyed ALIEN 3 and PROMETHEUS about the same (yes, perhaps I prove your thesis that the people who like ALIEN 3 are also the same breed that will enjoy PROMETHEUS). weylandyutani, thanks for the appreciation very kind!! ceejaynightwing, your attemps to post up *plot holes* remains idiotic and embarrassing to read! Only one escape pod?? No sir. You just need to pay more attention. cool_britannia79, you take issue that the xeno was born *fully formed* at the end? Well, the hugger that produced it was at least 20 times the size of the one we see in ALIEN - so the creature that was born being 20 times the size of the one that came from Kane seems fine to me? Again, a *plot hole* from a hater that simply isnt one. Think and use your imagination more, there are answers for many of your questions on screen. ice paul, you asked if the monster were good? Yes - the engineers are an incredible and striking creation. Uber muscled giant humanoids which look utterly real in every shot. I believe they were achieved by practical fx - *man in suit*. They make the Navi from AVATAR look like flimsy cartoons in comparison. The final struggle between one of these engineers and the giant squid is a stunning image drawn straight from classical greek mythology. Google image Laocoon - to see what Ridley tried to achieve with this amazing monster vs monster moment. Beautiful.

  • Ripley didn't really have any other choice at that point. In a situation like that, adrenaline pumping, maternal protection mode cranked to 11, I don't necessarily think Ripley said to herself, *ah shit, fuck Newt, Hicks, and Bishop's upper half.* Was she also pissed at the aliens and wanting to kill the queen? Yes, that too of course. I don't see any problem with Ripley having multiple layers of motivation by this point in the film. If anything, I think Cameron added Newt being pulled towards the airlock to amp up the final moments of the film's encore climax. It also gives Bishop something to do while Ripley struggles with the queen. Newt sliding across the floor is the cherry on top of the hot fudge and adrenaline sundae.

  • June 4, 2012, 4:44 a.m. CST

    Mountains of Madness in Space

    by CuervoJones

  • June 4, 2012, 4:55 a.m. CST

    Cobra-Kai

    by david starling

    I enjoyed the film greatly, and agree with your points. Also wanted to answer the point raised by someone about the 'convenient' second jockey ship that Shaw and David take at the end of the movie - when they arrive, they view not one, but a row of those dome structures (I could see about 4?) - who's to say that there isn't a ship per dome say, and as Janek suggested in the film (I understand that he 'suggested' it) that the place may have been a military installation?

  • June 4, 2012, 5:07 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    velvet, reading through this and other threads you'll repeatedly see idiots referring to it as a temple. It isn't - again they didn't pay attention to what is shown and said in the movie. You are 100% correct it is a 'military' installation - the line is delivered as you say - and the *derelict* spacecraft are bomber warships.

  • June 4, 2012, 5:09 a.m. CST

    And another thing about the film *spoilers*

    by david starling

    I loved the fact that when Peter Weyland introduces himself, he then introduces David, likening himself as his own son almost (which we find out later is a damning slight to Vickers), and yet in the next sentence he puts down David as well, making him seem "special" for the fact that he lacks a soul. There is also some real kind of hatred going on throughout the movie from Vickers to David - not just in the confrontation (already shown on this site!!) but her constant snaps at him - and he responds with withering apathetic answers. I'll say it now - the Weyland family is deeply messed-up!! There was a lot going-on there, but not necessarily directly in your face, so to speak. And another thing - did anyone else feel that all the way through the movie, that the whole point about David was maybe, just maybe, he did have his own personality, and feelings, if not quite a soul? The whole Lawrence of Arabia thing, and bleaching the hair (as well as quoting the movie) were signs, but it was when he called for Shaw at the end of the movie - stating that he feared she was dead as well? I felt that despite all that had happened to her (caesarian!!), he did have admiration for her in the end. And of all things, the question of what he would do when his master died was answered - to me it seemed that either he had to find someone else to follow, or that he was afraid of spending the rest of his life alone. To me at least, there was a lot more going-on in Prometheus than just a story about finding your "Gods".

  • June 4, 2012, 5:13 a.m. CST

    Saw it last night, DONT MISS IT.

    by Keith Maniac

    Theres no spoilers to give, because the best stuff would take way too much explaining. I've read reviews all week, peoples complaints and its baffling, but then its not, its the internet. Just above here, the first hour is sooooo slow, followed by the first hour is perefect. To be fair i've read probably more good reviews than bad, but now particularly people seem to get off on bad reviews either writing them or quoting them. Its NOT a Alien movie, there are connections, one main connection and others lesser ones. Dont think about the Alien movies, just keep them in the back of your head. It does not dwell on splatter and its not a "monster" movie, but it does have those things. What you do get, if you focus on it, are answers and larger questions from those answers, as to "what was in the chair and what was it doing". It does not answer everything, existing questions or new ones, its intentional. Because thats whats so damn good about it, it explains more, but doesnt remove all the mystery of the one main thing that connects this to Alien. If Ridley had tried to make this a straight on horror/sci-fi movie, it would have been suicidal and a waste of his and our time, Alien cant be topped. This is a sci-fi film, with "thriller" elements, thats intended to be the start of something and when considering that, gives you a lot to start with and not rehashing and cheap tricks. Its the most mature movie in the summer season for a far back as i can remember.

  • June 4, 2012, 5:13 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    SPOILER What is most interesting to me - in fact I think it is the key to deciphering the whole film is the opening coda on primordial Earth. Here we see an engineer dressed in robes, not armor. The spacecraft behind him, not a warship but a saucer. What does this tell us? He is certainly *apart* from the other armor-suited engineers. Is he an outcast? A good and benign engineer, not a Klingon-like evil one? Is he a sacrifice? Or is he... the title character? PROMETHEUS himself - the one who brought fire to man and was punished by the gods. (I love that the film doesn't tell us - but the more you dwell on the questions then logical answers present themselves. Those that dismiss the film before they've had a chance to think on it are doing themselves a disservice.)

  • June 4, 2012, 5:19 a.m. CST

    I bought the Alien Blu Ray Boxset and I have to say..

    by Baron Von Penguin

    That I came to the conclusion that Aliens has dated pretty badly and that fucking kid Newt is insufferable. As a kid myself I used to think Aliens was the better of the two (this is the mid 80s before any more sequels were made). This is probably because as a child I could not appreciated the quiet and emptiness that made Alien so creepy and atmospheric. I wanted guns and explosions and WAYYYYY more Alien encounters. When I originally saw Fincher's Alien3 in the cinema (1992?) I was unmoved. The film was cold and depressing. It seemed to be such a dreadful waste of such a great cast. However having watched the director's cut on Blu Ray I was absolutely gobsmacked. I feel Alien3 fits brilliantly in to the series and I'd go as far as to say that I think its a far better film than Aliens. For one thing I like the fact that it dispensed with all the macho bollocks that Cameron's gunfest was swamped in. And thank Christ Newt was killed. However the less said about Alien Resurrection the better suffice to say I'd still Watch Alien Vs Predator over it any fucking day.

  • June 4, 2012, 5:19 a.m. CST

    Weylands last line - *spoilers*

    by Fortunesfool

    Weyland (At the moment of death) - 'There is nothing!' David - 'Yes. Enjoy your journey sir.' One of the very few moments in the film that is genuinely intriguing. Discuss

  • June 4, 2012, 5:22 a.m. CST

    cobra--kai

    by lv_426

    I don't know about others, but I keep thinking of the pyramid structures as temples due to earlier drafts and designs of the original Alien having an occult themed religious temple where the alien eggs were to be found. Seeing as it seems Ridley is reusing some earlier concepts, as well as the Giger design for the Harkonnen pyramid. As for Prometheus, the Laocoon recreation sounds cool. I'm curious to see that and the Dune style Giger pyramid design. It is a bummer that Prometheus is disappointing much of the world's Alien fans so far, but I am glad that it entertained the dojo.

  • Not quite. Ripley was **willing to face her fears** if it meant returning to eradicate the alien species. It wasn't any kind of "revenge mission", it was to prevent the company getting its hands on the aliens and turning them into some kind of weapon. She wanted those things wiped out. That's her sole reason for going back: To exterminate them. To see with her own eyes that they're gone for good.

  • June 4, 2012, 5:33 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    lv_426, it did indeed. And I know from your posts that you are a guy with an *inquiring* mind so I hope you'll get into it too!

  • "...and the *derelict* spacecraft are bomber warships." As Lindelof says (in an article cool_britannia79 linked to in another 'Prometheus' talkback), the Engineers, the goo, the aliens; they're only weapons if you're predisposed to seeing them as weapons. It's that whole "if you're focused on looking for WMD, all you're going to see are WMD components and applications, you've blinkered yourself to other alternatives" situation. The Engineers could be benign. The black goo could be some kind of magical space vaccine. The 'bombers' could be medical transports. True, you've got the sole Engineer waking up and ripping heads off and rampaging around all over the place. On the surface, that sounds like he's not too friendly. On the other hand, he could be suffering some sort of cryo-sleep sickness that's sent him utterly bonkers or he could be suffering from Grimwade's Syndrome ('Doctor Who' ref FTW!).

  • June 4, 2012, 5:52 a.m. CST

    That was abit harsh...

    by Jericho Kane

    I saw the film yesterday and i really enjoyed it. Yes your going to be left with questions that will bother you but that happens alot with films. Just take it as it is, you will enjoy it more. I would say look at it as its own film and not really connected to the ALIEN methos. More what happened before they exsisted As for sequels I don't really see the need but I imagine some one will just for making money out of it. I would go again to see it. It gives you alot to think about after seeing it and I like movies that do that to you.

  • June 4, 2012, 5:55 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    scratchmonkey, I like the possibilities but on these 3 points.. The Engineers could be benign. The black goo could be some kind of magical space vaccine. The 'bombers' could be medical transports. Everything we hear or are shown in the movie points to the contrary.

  • June 4, 2012, 6:03 a.m. CST

    cobra--kai

    by cool_britannia79

    Stop saying the answers are there on screen, they're not. there is nothing on screen explaining how the not quite a xenomorph becomes the egg>facehugger>chestburster we see in Alien. Its just not there. And the opening scene you keep going on about? Ridley has already said it's a sacrifice, that the Engineer would have been treated like a king before he sacrificed himself to kick start all life on Earth. The fact you don't think that's fucking stupid says a lot. Why does it need to drink the black goo? Are Engineers so advanced they can create life itself, but only by breaking down one of their bodies to do so? They can't clone? They can't grow artificial flesh to break down? And why doesn't the black goo mutate them? Also, that first scene ruins any mystery in the movie, it ruins the helmet head reveal, it's entirely superfluous. Take the same scene, add it to the end fo the film, instead of the stupid CGI fight you also seem to love. That's a much more interesting movie. If we think Engineers are hostile throughout, if we hadn't assumed they created us, if we treat them as the enemy, only to find they are our fathers, that's a smarter story.

  • June 4, 2012, 6:11 a.m. CST

    Scott spills the beans *spoilers*

    by SunTzu77

    "And therefore there’s two questions in the film: the guy at the beginning is simply donating himself, no stranger than the Aztecs or Incas would choose some poor bugger, at the beginning saying “right, you’re it, in the year you get all the girls you want, all the food you want, blah blah, and at the end of the year we’re going to take your heart, take it out, squeeze it, and we’re going to get jolly good crops and good weather next year.” It’s no more than that, he’s into a form of donation, except his DNA is so powerful, each molecule is like a timebomb. So, we only set our standards by what we know here, which makes us essentially naive. We don’t, we can’t conceive of galloping DNA: I release that on the desk, and in a second I’ve got a cotton wool ball going black. We can’t conceive that because it’s not in your frame of experience. So you’ve got to take your brain, put it on the side, and when you enter the movie just let yourself breath." http://www.slashgear.com/ridley-scott-talks-prometheus-with-slashgear-candid-uncut-02231334/ I believe Mel Gibson could have written and directed a better film.

  • Ah, but is it everything we hear or see, or is it everything that we **interpret** via the human experience? :) That's what I always liked about the mystery of the Space Jockey and his derelict: That he had motives and plans that we couldn't even translate into human terms. That's not a spaceship. He's not a pilot. Those aren't eggs brimming with hideous life. They're... something really fucking strange we can't even comprehend because our human minds are so bloody limited. Another related possibility: Benign aliens, vaccine, medical transports. They're hostile to us because **we're** the plague/problem? He wakes up and the first thing he sees is his medical facility overrun by cockroaches? I think someone posited much the same thing in another talkback: Humanity as pets or an experiment that's got way out of control during his prolonged nap?

  • June 4, 2012, 6:13 a.m. CST

    Prometheus 2

    by SunTzu77

    The sequel will be a prequel... the Space Jockeys examine various pyramids on their home planet and decide to find their makers.

  • June 4, 2012, 6:16 a.m. CST

    scratchmonkey

    by cool_britannia79

    that's interesting but doesn't explain why engineers visited earth after kick starting life there, or why just these 4 or 5 engineers wanted to wipe us out 2000 years ago, before something attacked them.

  • June 4, 2012, 6:19 a.m. CST

    It is a pretty amusing article...

    by SunTzu77

    "In the funny kind of way it’s a lesson: in Blade Runner, those backgrounds, the cityscapes when he’s climbing around the side of the building, you can see they’re paintings but they’re really quite good. Today, you’d never even attempt to do that, you’d sample architecture and drop it in, on absolute lens and perspective so it’s absolutely seamless, there’s no join. But in those days it was hand-painted. And it’s a big lesson, because really, the most important, significant thing in all films – I don’t give a sh*t whether it’s science-fiction or a western or whatever – it’s the goddamned screenplay. Get the screenplay right, and all this technology enhances it. But when the screenplay is week… the technology is the means to the end, the screenplay is the end. And if you get that right first, the rest is relatively straightforward." ROFL ... screenplay... should have fired the writer on Prometheus http://www.slashgear.com/ridley-scott-talks-prometheus-with-slashgear-candid-uncut-02231334/

  • June 4, 2012, 6:30 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    cool_britannia, again you missed a lot my friend. You say *there is nothing on screen explaining how the not quite a xenomorph becomes the egg>facehugger>chestburster we see in Alien. Its just not there.* You, and others, have misinterpreted the chestbursting alien at the end to be the *birth* of the first Alien that we know and love from the Alien series of movies. In truth the xenomorph has already existed for thousands of years before the events of PROMETHEUS. The clues are there on screen - the Alien that bursts from the engineer is NOT the first Alien. Clue 1 - David finds sticky xeno goo on the control panel, just like Hicks does in ALIENS. As an even deeper tiny visual detail when he stretches the goo between his fingers youll see what look like the jaws of an Alien. Clue 2 - The hologram of the engineers running. What are they running from? Later we see their fossilized corpses, one of the characters remarks that their chests have been bursted. Clue 3 - As the camera swoops around the chamber with the giant head we see a mural of an Alien sculpted in the wall.

  • June 4, 2012, 6:31 a.m. CST

    @cool_britannia79

    by buggerbugger

    That does, indeed, sound like a much better reveal of the Engineers' motives in your last post. Showing the sacrificial 'god' at the start of the movie is the equivalent to starting 'Psycho' with a scene of Norman Bates swapping out of his mother's clothes to greet the latest customer of the Bates Motel. "Why does it need to drink the black goo? Are Engineers so advanced they can create life itself, but only by breaking down one of their bodies to do so? They can't clone? They can't grow artificial flesh to break down?" Yep, that all seems fairly (okay, incredibly) dumb for a race of highly-advanced genetic engineers who can create multi-cellular life from scratch. Am I right in thinking that the Engineer drinks the goo on an Earth that already has water (and hence microbes) and plant life? If so... that means he hasn't created life on Earth, we're basically a cuckoo species that has been inserted into this planet's 'nest' in place of the original 'chicks'? Hmm. The Engineers seek out viable planets and then use their own DNA to 'hijack' them rather than going through the lengthy process of terraforming planets from scratch? Is that what's going on?

  • June 4, 2012, 6:32 a.m. CST

    Hang on. So, the guy at the start. He's just been dropped off..

    by Fortunesfool

    He drinks the stuff. DNA shit happens. He mixes with the water and that starts our cycle of evolution?

  • It's really simple. The film itself is mutated copy of Alien and this parallels the nature of DNA replication and hence the theme of the film which is that both life and ideas require a blueprint prior to their creation. Plato argued that behind all things there exists a universe of perfect forms. To illustrate his thesis he provided the following example: Horses. Every single horse is unique and subtly different from the next yet somehow we all know precisely what we are looking at when we see a horse. That's because the 'idea' of the horse is permanent. The idea precedes the object or at least information precedes origin. It is this idea of recursion, the chicken and the egg if you will, that underlies Prometheus. It is a thesis embedded into the structure of both the script and the completed film. That Prometheus depends upon Alien to exist despite it being a prequel adds yet more layers to this already compelling story. The film is enhanced even further by the character of David. David depended on man for his creation and yet, he despises man for not valuing their creation. He values himself for his own sake, much as we value ourselves in spite of the fact that we ourselves are nothing more than food to 'lesser' life forms that populate this film. There is simply so much going on in this film that I feel it is a fascinating triumph. Yes, I didn't feel the kamikaze scene had been earned. Yes, the film is not as relentlessly tense and scary as Alien. Yes, the music is not as memorable. But I tell you what... This film is as fascinating a creation as any of the previous films and I mean that sincerely. The detractors are obsessed with conservative formalism. Prometheus is the future. Get used to it.

  • June 4, 2012, 6:35 a.m. CST

    Cobra--Kai

    by cool_britannia79

    You're just guessing that's what it all meant. I agree it's a strong possibility, but then why bother with that xeno reveal at the end? I've also commented on the xeno being on the wall at the beginning before it's apparent creation at the end. I think what we're seeing are echoes from a previous draft merging with what we finally ended up with on screen. If you're being generous, and you are, you call it room for mystery. If you're fuming at being let down by Ridley, and I am, you call it a plot hole.

  • June 4, 2012, 6:42 a.m. CST

    Xenomorph

    by james brook

    The reveal at the end was beautiful. The creature was NOT the alien we know and love. It, much like Prometheus itself, was a precursor, a prototype. It fitted perfectly with the message of the film. We are not the same as our ancestors, rather we are in a perpetual state of incremental modification, mutation and change. It was a proto-alien. It was awesome.

  • June 4, 2012, 6:42 a.m. CST

    congcongbo

    by JAMF

    are you bitchassmother by any chance.

  • It seemed really obvious. But, like most of the movie, didn't make any sense.

  • June 4, 2012, 6:47 a.m. CST

    jamf

    by james brook

    I am bitchassmother, congcongbo is my girlfriend and we sometimes use each others accounts interchangeably.

  • June 4, 2012, 6:48 a.m. CST

    congcongbo and cobra--kai

    by cool_britannia79

    Alien Resurrection dealt with DNA and being in a constant state of change, as well as genetic memories etc Is Alien Resurrection worthy of such high praise?

  • But isn't that just some human's assumption, thousands of years after the fact? The Engineer could have been up to something completely different when he drank the black goo. Maybe he had no idea it would screw with Earth's eco-wotsit and give rise to humanity. We're seeing - and being told of - the Engineer's motives from our own human POV. "or why just these 4 or 5 engineers wanted to wipe us out 2000 years ago, before something attacked them." I'm guessing they got attacked by those snake-things or something? Clearly some kind of chestburster type, aye? It does make you wonder what the actual connection is between Engineers, goo and wormy-snakes. Did the Engineers create the goo? Did they stumble upon it? Did they import the worm things from home, to see what the goo would do to them and then it all got out of hand when the goo released its potential on those simple life-forms? 2000 years later... Perhaps they'd just realised how dangerous the black goo could be, that it could force-evolve harmless little worm-things into large, life-threatening snakey face-rapists and that maybe Bob the Engineer's little chemical spill on Earth all those centuries ago could have given birth to A Bad Thing if the 'mankind mutation' made its way to the stars? BTW, is the period of 2000 years mentioned onscreen? Do the star maps predate that and they are therefore a friendly invitation (to a 'weapons' base that shouldn't exist yet, WTF? Makes no sense at all to me) or are they part of the trap that will lead us to our intended doom at the 'weapons' base?

  • June 4, 2012, 6:50 a.m. CST

    you guys are playing into the hands of

    by JAMF

    prometheus fans like cobra by saying 'this doesnt make sense' - just focus on the bad characters, dialogue and plot - dont worry about 'unanswered questions' - those are deliberate by lindelof to a) make the film more mysterious to make it a phenomenon on twitter etc b) to make people see the film more than once so they get every little 'clue' and c) make people want to see the sequel to answer the questions posed in this film.

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battlefield_Earth_%28film%29

  • June 4, 2012, 6:58 a.m. CST

    2000 years was the carbon date on the headless Engineer

    by cool_britannia79

    I think the most interesting theory came from my mate who said that the Engineers were also summoned there 2000 years ago and wiped out. Doesn't quite fit with there being multiple Engineer ships etc but if they'd clipped the screenplay a little it could have been left open ended, again, a far more interesting story. 'God' creating life in his image, only to summon all his creations back to erase them and start again.

  • June 4, 2012, 6:59 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    jamf, you're the drill instructor teaching your flash mob of trolls how to troll better?! Ha, that is too funny.

  • June 4, 2012, 7 a.m. CST

    The guy in Men in Black 3 who can see multiple time lines -

    by Fortunesfool

    More intriguing concept (and execution) than this.

  • June 4, 2012, 7:02 a.m. CST

    fortunesfool

    by SunTzu77

    According to Scott... basically yes.... but he likens them to the Aztecs sacrificing for their crops, etc. So, these alleged highly intelligent beings don't understand their own DNA and are going around seeding planets.

  • June 4, 2012, 7:04 a.m. CST

    no i'm saying they make it too easy for you to

    by JAMF

    put out your "wahh you just dont GET IT, YOU IZ NOT WATCHIN DA MOVIE PROPPALY!" retorts, like an inception/lost talkback or something... the problems with the film sound like script problems, so those are the problems to be argued over -- there's no room for "faulty interpretation" of a character acting dumb or having shit dialogue is there? that's just plain bad, no question. flashmob of trolls... pfft really...

  • June 4, 2012, 7:04 a.m. CST

    Scratchmonkey

    by cool_britannia79

    Good questions dude, another one for you. You're an Engineer, your team has been wiped out by something. You make it to the command deck of a ship, and promptly put yourself in cryo instead of escaping. Why would you do that? Only thing I can think of is the parallel with Shaw being put into cryo as she's infected. Do you think the original draft had the jockey woken up, killing all the humans, getting in the pilot seat and crashing on LV426 (or indeed, LV223 when it was still called LV426) as his chest burst?

  • June 4, 2012, 7:07 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    Now listen up fellow trolls. Dont debate the unanswered questions you couldnt understand, the fans who paid attention to the film like Cobra might have answers for you. Thats a suicide run. Much better if we keep our hate to things like the hammy dialog and the bad characters. But sir...um.. isn't David one of the most interesting and iconic sci fi characters to have emerged this last decade? Shut up private! You are hereby expelled from the troll brigade. Now keep going the rest of you, vent your hate and spleen. Once more unto the breach dear trolls. Once more!

  • June 4, 2012, 7:10 a.m. CST

    I get it

    by james brook

    Questions and themes alone do not justify a poor execution. However, I just came back from Cannes and let me tell you, the kind of movies celebrated at Cannes ALL demand interpretation from their audience. Without exception, the films that are screened there, the most prestigious film festival in the world, REQUIRE viewer participation in order to be appreciated. Scott understands this. Battlefield Earth and Alien Resurrection did not. It's like comparing a Mark Rothko or a Jackson Pollock to a Damien Hirst. The former have depth and value, the latter does not. I will accept that some elements of Prometheus were illogical and tonally in-congruent. I will not accept that it is a bad film. It is a compelling, polymorphous, virus of a movie that gets under the skin and burrows its way around the mind. It is not INTENDED as a pure entertainment. It is a work of art and an exciting, gory, fascinating one at that. Please give it another try.

  • The sequel will have Space Jockeys trying to discover "who seeded them" as they pilot the "Valdez."

  • June 4, 2012, 7:13 a.m. CST

    David 8 wasn't iconic though.

    by cool_britannia79

    He's entirely derivative of Data and Wall-E. He asked no questions popular, mainstream sci fi hasn't asked a thousand times before. There's even that god awful line about what David will do when Weyland dies and he has to think for himself. David does not develop, AT ALL. He is an immoral machine that does what he's told, his only development is contacting Elizabeth after Weyland dies, that's the sum total of David 8.

  • June 4, 2012, 7:14 a.m. CST

    also no subject

    by JAMF

    sign... i'm agreeing with you that the 'unanswered questions', whatever they may be, don't count as 'script problems' or 'plotholes' and therefore should not be 'argued' about -- they can be 'discussed' about what they mean sure, but shouldn't be dismissed as mistakes or continuity errors by the prometheus 'haters' who i have no real affiliation with other than us all not liking lindelof that much. as i said i think it was all done on purpose to wind people up and make us want to see a sequel which might actually provide concrete answers (guess what, it probably won't) also, one good character does not a 'modern scifi classic' make. thanks.

  • June 4, 2012, 7:15 a.m. CST

    David 8 was too Prometheus what Woola was to John Carter

    by Fortunesfool

    The highlight.

  • June 4, 2012, 7:19 a.m. CST

    congcongbo

    by cool_britannia79

    'It's like comparing a Mark Rothko or a Jackson Pollock to a Damien Hirst. The former have depth and value, the latter does not.' Ah so it's ok for YOU to decide what 'high art' has value, but not for anyone who disagrees with you? It's like comparing Alien to Prometheus, the former has depth and value, the latter does not.

  • June 4, 2012, 7:27 a.m. CST

    Here's my review of the film....

    by SunTzu77

    If you're a film student wanting to watch a film that had great DP and Directing work... then I recommend Prometheus. I also recommend wannabe writers to watch the film and chronicle every glaring hole in the script. This film should be the posterchild of how NOT to make a movie....the script matters first..... andddd I'm out of beer....bbl

  • June 4, 2012, 7:45 a.m. CST

    Prometheus!!! Can't fucking wait!!!!!!!!!

    by UltraTron

  • June 4, 2012, 7:45 a.m. CST

    "2000 years was the carbon date on the headless Engineer"

    by buggerbugger

    Ah, I see. So this is the timeline? An Engineer kick-starts or alters the course of life on Earth by topping himself with black goo. He may or may not be the same type of Engineer 'caste' as the ones on LV-223. He dresses in robes, possibly denoting priest, sage, knowledge, while they dress in armour, denoting soldiers and propensity for war? At various points in history after this, other Engineers visit our ancestors to see how they're coming along and show the star map to our developing civilizations. The star map shows you how to get to LV-223, which may or may not be a weapons facility full of black goo and snake-rape for all these millennia. Then, two thousand years ago, there is an accident or an outbreak of chestbursting shenanigans at the LV-223 base during some dodgy black goo DNA experiments. All the armour-clad 'military' Engineers present die except for one, who saves himself by going for a long nap. Two thousand years after the chestbursting outbreak, mankind is advanced enough to travel to LV-223 and the crew of the Prometheus are disappointed to learn that the remaining Engineer thinks we're quite possibly a bunch of cunts who should have possibly been wiped out just as Jesus was learning carpentry. The Engineers who kept visiting us and handing out star maps - that seems a bit too elaborate and pointless if it's all part of a trap by 'military' types who aren't on the same page as the sacrificial Engineer who gave the spark of life. If they saw life on Earth developing to the point where it could paint on cave walls, just wipe us out with some advanced planet-cracker or something. So the Engineer visitors must have been benign? Or at least not altogether antagonistic. But if so, why give us a map to a military base that's taking tens of thousands of years (?!) to successfully develop a bio-weapon to wipe us out? So... LV-223 wasn't always a weapons base? Two thousand years ago there was a change of the Engineer mindset or there was some meh kind of military junta-style takeover and the Engineers went from life-spreading space-hippies to interstellar pest controllers? I like your friend's theory that the Engineers are as clueless as us when it comes to LV-223 and the mystery of the bio-goo, but I don't see how that fits with their coming to Earth, giving life a kick up the bum and then keeping tabs on us and printing out star maps for everyone. This really sounds like one of those "He's making it all up as he goes along even if Point A contradicts Point B" deals, doesn't it? No, not me; Lindelof. And yep, I say that as a fan of 'Lost'. I preferred the Space Jockey when he was an inexplicable alien elephant growing out of a chair. I knew when they announced "A prequel - or two - to Alien!" that it couldn't possibly end well, even if directed by Scott. it's the story that matters. And today's writers, who grew up geeking on these movies, don't seem to have the imagination, talent or confidence to create their own things and move a story forward. All they can do is take the pre-existing toys and frot themselves silly over them. "We're doing a 'Star Wars' prequel! I'm the writer who gets to show you Darth Vader and Boba Fett as kids, awesome!" "We're doing a 'Thing' prequel! I'm the writer who gets to show you the Thing in its original form, awesome!" "We're doing an 'Alien' prequel! I'm the writer who gets to show you living Space Jockeys and the original facehuggers and chestbursters, awesome!"

  • June 4, 2012, 7:55 a.m. CST

    Scratchmonkey

    by cool_britannia79

    Let's have a pint and tell tales. You're my new best friend.

  • June 4, 2012, 8:09 a.m. CST

    @cool_britannia79

    by buggerbugger

    "You're an Engineer, your team has been wiped out by something. You make it to the command deck of a ship, and promptly put yourself in cryo instead of escaping. Why would you do that?" Yep, I'd agree with the 'infection' you suggest. If he were fine, he would evacuate, maybe signal Engineer Prime that it's all gone tits up and nobody should approach LV-223, complete and utter quarantine. So he didn't evacuate for a reason. There are other ships present and he doesn't use any of them. David shows that the ships can be piloted by a single person, so it's not as if the remaining Engineer couldn't leave because he had nobody to stoke the boiler. Maybe the ships are full of the black goo ampules that are to be kept away from Engineer Prime at all costs, to prevent further face-rape outbreaks? If Shaw and Head of David are piloting a ship full of bio-weapons toward Engineer Prime, does that mean they're about to unintentionally wipe out the entire race (if they still exist)? I still not entirely sure how this all ties in with a fossilized Space Jockey on LV-426. The dead Jockeys on LV-223 don't look like they're dessicated, I'm guessing? One ship has a hull breach while the other doesn't, so the different atmospheric conditions lead to the variance in bodily preservation on LV-223 and -426? Extrapolation: The LV-426 derelict was part of the LV-223 bio-weapon mission and when the unforeseen chestbursting kicked off, this one particular Engineer buggered off in a ship to escape the quarantine, only for a chestburster to pop out and kill him mid-flight, resulting in the LV-426 crash? And then the newborn queen layed a shipful of eggs, eventually died, and then the Nostromo arrived 2000 years later?

  • June 4, 2012, 8:10 a.m. CST

    @cool_britannia79

    by buggerbugger

    Haha :) *clinks glass*

  • June 4, 2012, 8:11 a.m. CST

    Question for those who have seen it

    by stever1

    If you disregard everything released after the first Alien movie, and consider this the second movie in the series, does your opinion of it go up or down?

  • June 4, 2012, 8:13 a.m. CST

    so much for PROMETHEUS dominating the Box Office!

    by j2talk

    bust!!!!Now the question is will The Dark Knight Rises disappoint it as well??????????

  • June 4, 2012, 8:14 a.m. CST

    now will Will The Dark Knight Rises disappoint as well?

    by j2talk

  • June 4, 2012, 8:32 a.m. CST

    @steve1 - No, it's still crap.

    by Fortunesfool

  • Piss off the edge? If he knew that was gonna happen, why didn't he stand in the river?

  • June 4, 2012, 8:42 a.m. CST

    It can't be as bad/controversial as Alien 3...

    by photoboy

    ... unless Lindelof has found a way to kill off Ripley, Hicks and Newt again. In which case Alien 3 has some competition for shittest Alien sequel.

  • June 4, 2012, 9:07 a.m. CST

    As a homage to 'Alien 3'...

    by buggerbugger

    ...'Prometheus 2' starts with the Engineer ship from LV-223 crashing on Engineer Prime. Shaw is killed on impact, leaving Head of David as the movie's protagonist, waddling around on little mechanical spider legs he's fashioned for himself on the long journey through space. He tries to warn the Engineers that there is a nasty alien life-form in the wreckage and it must be hunted down and killed. It turns out that Engineer Prime is infested with tiny worm-like parasites, this world's version of lice, and the entire population has had to shave itself entirely bald for generations, awaiting the long-overdue return of the Engineer chemists from their laboratory on a faraway planetoid. Seemingly, the chemists had been developing a black goo delousing shampoo under laboratory conditions, but things had gone wrong. Terribly wrong. Instead of killing the lice, the black goo shampoo (Shamgoo™) had acted as a nutrient, making the lice bigger, stronger. And a tad rapey, if we're being honest. Head of David, halfway through shaving his robotic head by tooting into a razor-flute held in his little legs, finally puts two and two together, makes his excuses and hails a space taxi before he gets skullfucked by a planet full of angry skinheads. 'Prometheus 3' will, of course, reveal that there was a facehugger in the taxi all along.

  • June 4, 2012, 9:10 a.m. CST

    Alien 3 is very under-rated. This is Resurrection with pretentions.

    by Fortunesfool

  • June 4, 2012, 9:49 a.m. CST

    the best sci-fi makes sense...

    by awesomebri

    the best sci-fi makes sense, and has well thought out sonstructed ideas, this has always been the case, even with Alien... it just made sense. Lost was mysterious at first but it spiralled out of control to the point it was contradicting itself on a weekly basis. Prometheus has done the same by ignoring the rules of the Alien movie(s) and just posing too much questions without answers, which is a totally unsatisfying expierence. Lindelof is a terrible writer, end of story.

  • June 4, 2012, 10:15 a.m. CST

    Weylands last line - *spoilers*

    by Fortunesfool

    Weyland (At the moment of death) - 'There is nothing!' David - 'Yes. Enjoy your journey sir.' One of the very few moments in the film that is genuinely intriguing. Discuss

  • June 4, 2012, 10:16 a.m. CST

    My Review (SPOLIERS)

    by Arcane

    Whilst it’s obvious that many people are balking at what Ridley Scott and David Lindelof have created in Prometheus, it’s also clear to me that many people have become unnecessarily critical of the movie on the grounds that the film fails to coherently fit into their preconceived notions of what is called the ‘Alien Universe’ Personally I have to agree that this film does indeed suffer from several narrative errors that, whether present by mistake or by design, only serve to damage the experience from a story-telling point of view. Furthermore, and admittedly from a deeply subjective point of view, I feel that while many aspects of design in this film are impressive to say the least, the ‘creatures’ that ultimately appear to menace our protagonists are, by sharp contrast to say the vehicle and set design, very poorly designed and logically moribund. That last point is, I think, pretty important as my intuition tells me that is where many of the feelings of disappointment and anger emerge among many of the people who’ve seen the movie; namely the underwhelming manner in which xenomorphic biology and behaviour is handled in a universe that traditionally has made such effort to treat extraterrestrial biology with, at the very least, a fair degree of rational explanation and logic. For example, in the first movie ‘Alien’, from the point Kane is brought back aboard the Nostromo with the ‘face-hugger’ attached barely a moment passes without some form of investigative prodding, slicing or pondering by nervous crew members. It is literally through the crews’ collective anxiety over the situation, and their efforts to reach some sort of understanding of the alien, that the audience learn important facts about its biology that in turn raise tension and hint at greater questions. In contrast, when the crew of the Prometheus happen upon the alien technology contained in the facility on LV-226 there is a distinct lack of exposition and focus on their attempts to understand exactly what they have stumbled upon. As a result the audience is left to make sense of the nonsensical; an aggressive alien ‘worm’ presumably mutated from some soft-bodied invertebrate falling into ‘black goo’, an aborted foetal stage cephalopod type creature that develops over a period of hours into something resembling a psychotic giant octopus. Leaving these matters aside for a moment and returning to the issue of narrative there exists equally perplexing issues. For example, at one point during the final act a hugely significant plot development is revealed to the audience via a couple of lines of dialogue with absolutely no explanation whatsoever as to how or why the character who utters these lines has come to such incredible conclusions. So fundamental to the events of the final act is this information (namely that the structure they have been poking around is a bio-weapons facility developed by the ‘Engineers’ who are preparing an imminent attack on human-beings) that the lack of prior screen time devoted to analysis of the ‘facility’ and its contents by the crew aboard the Prometheus reveals itself to be a serious thorn in the narratives side. Ultimately these kinds of glaring omissions leave the viewer scratching their head over exactly how and why many of the events they witness unfold as they do. There is the question of whether or not that could be intentional. Perhaps so, but even accepting the possibility Scott and Lindelof have conspired to produce a puzzle by design, the degree to which any clues are adequately examined via the protagonists in the movie only adds to the overall sense of incoherence and disjointedness in the narrative. These issues aside, I still feel that what is ultimately missed by many people complaining about this movie is just how well it works when it isn’t dealing with ‘what is in those containers and how it fits into the Alien franchise’ Clearly what Scott and Lindelof are most interested in has very little to do with such matters as, when you discard the ill-conceived and transitory nods to the Alien mythology, the real story in Prometheus is actually the story of humankinds obsession with creation and the myths that have surrounded that obsession for hundreds of years. It’s fairly clear, from the opening scene onwards, that Prometheus is the attempt by Scott and Lindelof to reinvigorate the ‘ancient astronaut’ hypothesis within the parameters of a modern science-fiction adventure film. I say ‘reinvigorate’ precisely because those ideas, popular though they might have been some time ago, have been largely absent from mainstream movie-making in recent years. For those unfamiliar with the concept of the ‘ancient astronaut’ I suggest searching the term on the internet for plentiful information. For those who want a brief summary the hypothesis argues that, some time during the prehistory of humankind the planet Earth was visited by an advanced alien race whom, amongst other things, genetically manipulated early hominids to create modern ‘homo sapiens’ and, by implication, gave rise to a series of hyperbolic myths surrounding the origins of our species as early humankind struggled to document the incredible truth of their own creation. The implications of the theory are huge and far-reaching but largely ignored by mainstream science at this time. It is, without any shadow of a doubt, this hypothesis and its implications, that Ridley Scott and David Lindelof have set out to explore. It is this idea that informs the narrative, characters and situations that they find themselves in. In other words, from what I can tell, it is only when watching the movie from this point of view that it starts to make any sense whatsoever. Now that’s a problem. Why? It is a problem because the palette with which Scott and Lindelof have chosen to explore these ideas is one which comes with a predetermined mythos (the ‘Alien’ mythos) The result is a movie which, after setting the scene for an exploration of the creation myths of humanity through the hypothesis of ‘ancient astronauts’ finds itself having to fit its revelations and plot developments within the well known parameters of an existing science fiction universe. Clearly something has to give and, as it was never the primary topic in Scott’s vision, it is the ‘Alien’ mythos that now finds itself in subjugation to the ‘new’ story Scott and Lindelof are interested in telling. In other words the beloved xenomorphs, in all their disturbing and horrific incarnations, are unceremoniously delegated to the role of ‘extras’ in Scott’s new, more ambitious, tale. In this story it is the humans and their ‘Gods’ who take centre stage; the bio-weapons merely one consequence amongst many in a universe populated by walking agents of creation. My feeling on the Prometheus reaction is that Scott and Lindelof would have been better served completely eradicating ANY suggestion that their story was tied, however distantly, with the Alien mythos. By this I do not mean doing what they clearly tried to do (that is stating as much but then hinting that the tale would share ‘Alien DNA’), rather they should have completely eradicated any hint whatsoever that this movie was set in the same universe and simply let the audience discover that with their own eyes. This would have allowed viewers to digest Prometheus on its own merits without approaching the project already burdened with the baggage of an already established and beloved science-fiction universe. Unfortunately, such an opportunity was lost the moment imagery lifted straight from Alien (Giger designs, Space Jockeys, etc) began popping up in trailers. In this way it is ironic that the same thing which created such hype and anticipation for this film is the same thing that ends up provoking such a negative reaction from its viewers. Prometheus has its flaws. Indeed, so glaring are they that it is fairly heroic to suggest it could ever be considered to take a place amongst the classics with which it ‘shares DNA’. However, flawed though it may be, Prometheus is contradictorily an intelligent and daring film that, if nothing else, revisits the larger and more significant questions that have driven intelligent science fiction for decades and does so with great visual panache. On this basis alone I think the movie partially succeeds.

  • June 4, 2012, 10:22 a.m. CST

    My Review (SPOILERS)

    by Arcane

    Whilst it’s obvious that many people are balking at what Ridley Scott and David Lindelof have created in Prometheus, it’s also clear to me that many people have become unnecessarily critical of the movie on the grounds that the film fails to coherently fit into their preconceived notions of what is called the ‘Alien Universe’ Personally I have to agree that this film does indeed suffer from several narrative errors that, whether present by mistake or by design, only serve to damage the experience from a story-telling point of view. Furthermore, and admittedly from a deeply subjective point of view, I feel that while many aspects of design in this film are impressive to say the least, the ‘creatures’ that ultimately appear to menace our protagonists are, by sharp contrast to say the vehicle and set design, very poorly designed and logically moribund. That last point is, I think, pretty important as my intuition tells me that is where many of the feelings of disappointment and anger emerge among many of the people who’ve seen the movie; namely the underwhelming manner in which xenomorphic biology and behaviour is handled in a universe that traditionally has made such effort to treat extraterrestrial biology with, at the very least, a fair degree of rational explanation and logic. For example, in the first movie ‘Alien’, from the point Kane is brought back aboard the Nostromo with the ‘face-hugger’ attached barely a moment passes without some form of investigative prodding, slicing or pondering by nervous crew members. It is literally through the crews’ collective anxiety over the situation, and their efforts to reach some sort of understanding of the alien, that the audience learn important facts about its biology that in turn raise tension and hint at greater questions. In contrast, when the crew of the Prometheus happen upon the alien technology contained in the facility on LV-226 there is a distinct lack of exposition and focus on their attempts to understand exactly what they have stumbled upon. As a result the audience is left to make sense of the nonsensical; an aggressive alien ‘worm’ presumably mutated from some soft-bodied invertebrate falling into ‘black goo’, an aborted foetal stage cephalopod type creature that develops over a period of hours into something resembling a psychotic giant octopus. Leaving these matters aside for a moment and returning to the issue of narrative there exists equally perplexing issues. For example, at one point during the final act a hugely significant plot development is revealed to the audience via a couple of lines of dialogue with absolutely no explanation whatsoever as to how or why the character who utters these lines has come to such incredible conclusions. So fundamental to the events of the final act is this information (namely that the structure they have been poking around is a bio-weapons facility developed by the ‘Engineers’ who are preparing an imminent attack on human-beings) that the lack of prior screen time devoted to analysis of the ‘facility’ and its contents by the crew aboard the Prometheus reveals itself to be a serious thorn in the narratives side. Ultimately these kinds of glaring omissions leave the viewer scratching their head over exactly how and why many of the events they witness unfold as they do. There is the question of whether or not that could be intentional. Perhaps so, but even accepting the possibility Scott and Lindelof have conspired to produce a puzzle by design, the degree to which any clues are adequately examined via the protagonists in the movie only adds to the overall sense of incoherence and disjointedness in the narrative. These issues aside, I still feel that what is ultimately missed by many people complaining about this movie is just how well it works when it isn’t dealing with ‘what is in those containers and how it fits into the Alien franchise’ Clearly what Scott and Lindelof are most interested in has very little to do with such matters as, when you discard the ill-conceived and transitory nods to the Alien mythology, the real story in Prometheus is actually the story of humankinds obsession with creation and the myths that have surrounded that obsession for hundreds of years. It’s fairly clear, from the opening scene onwards, that Prometheus is the attempt by Scott and Lindelof to reinvigorate the ‘ancient astronaut’ hypothesis within the parameters of a modern science-fiction adventure film. I say ‘reinvigorate’ precisely because those ideas, popular though they might have been some time ago, have been largely absent from mainstream movie-making in recent years. For those unfamiliar with the concept of the ‘ancient astronaut’ I suggest searching the term on the internet for plentiful information. For those who want a brief summary the hypothesis argues that, some time during the prehistory of humankind the planet Earth was visited by an advanced alien race whom, amongst other things, genetically manipulated early hominids to create modern ‘homo sapiens’ and, by implication, gave rise to a series of hyperbolic myths surrounding the origins of our species as early humankind struggled to document the incredible truth of their own creation. The implications of the theory are huge and far-reaching but largely ignored by mainstream science at this time. It is, without any shadow of a doubt, this hypothesis and its implications, that Ridley Scott and David Lindelof have set out to explore. It is this idea that informs the narrative, characters and situations that they find themselves in. In other words, from what I can tell, it is only when watching the movie from this point of view that it starts to make any sense whatsoever. Now that’s a problem. Why? It is a problem because the palette with which Scott and Lindelof have chosen to explore these ideas is one which comes with a predetermined mythos (the ‘Alien’ mythos) The result is a movie which, after setting the scene for an exploration of the creation myths of humanity through the hypothesis of ‘ancient astronauts’ finds itself having to fit its revelations and plot developments within the well known parameters of an existing science fiction universe. Clearly something has to give and, as it was never the primary topic in Scott’s vision, it is the ‘Alien’ mythos that now finds itself in subjugation to the ‘new’ story Scott and Lindelof are interested in telling. In other words the beloved xenomorphs, in all their disturbing and horrific incarnations, are unceremoniously delegated to the role of ‘extras’ in Scott’s new, more ambitious, tale. In this story it is the humans and their ‘Gods’ who take centre stage; the bio-weapons merely one consequence amongst many in a universe populated by walking agents of creation. My feeling on the Prometheus reaction is that Scott and Lindelof would have been better served completely eradicating ANY suggestion that their story was tied, however distantly, with the Alien mythos. By this I do not mean doing what they clearly tried to do (that is stating as much but then hinting that the tale would share ‘Alien DNA’), rather they should have completely eradicated any hint whatsoever that this movie was set in the same universe and simply let the audience discover that with their own eyes. This would have allowed viewers to digest Prometheus on its own merits without approaching the project already burdened with the baggage of an already established and beloved science-fiction universe. Unfortunately, such an opportunity was lost the moment imagery lifted straight from Alien (Giger designs, Space Jockeys, etc) began popping up in trailers. In this way it is ironic that the same thing which created such hype and anticipation for this film is the same thing that ends up provoking such a negative reaction from its viewers. Prometheus has its flaws. Indeed, so glaring are they that it is fairly heroic to suggest it could ever be considered to take a place amongst the classics with which it ‘shares DNA’. However, flawed though it may be, Prometheus is contradictorily an intelligent and daring film that, if nothing else, revisits the larger and more significant questions that have driven intelligent science fiction for decades and does so with great visual panache. On this basis alone I think the movie partially succeeds.

  • June 4, 2012, 10:26 a.m. CST

    The Xenomorph Question Explained

    by fitz-hume

    Here's my theory. The xenomorph in Prometheus is obviously a queen baby. It's more angularly shaped just like the queen in Aliens was. The one in Aliens was a full-grown queen however with full-grown's features while the one in Prometheus is just a baby. A bigger baby than those bursting from human chests but still a baby. Thus engineer > queen xenomorph > egg > facehugger + humans > the kind of xenomorphs we're customed to see in the Alien movies.

  • June 4, 2012, 10:29 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    arcane1977, nice review - always great to see someone making a real effort with their posts (so good you double posted, oops!). I think you are being a bit harsh on the slow discovery of the site being a weapons factory though. After all the crews first foray into the site is curtailed by the sandstorm, and their second by the discovery of dead Milburn and Holloways mutation - so on neither occasion do they have adequate time to *scientifically explore* in the manner which you seem to be alluding to. To their credit they do examine the pieces they brought back with them (the autoposy on the head, and David examining the far). The similar nitpick complaint could be levelled at ALIEN where they discover a fossilized Space Jockey and dont take any samples or any further interest in it. Parker and Brett keep going on about bonuses and money - surely such a find of alien artifcats would be worth millions. Like the crew of PROMETHEUS, survival instincts kick in and they have other things on their minds.

  • June 4, 2012, 10:41 a.m. CST

    Survival instinct...

    by Arcane

    Cobra-kai Point taken and I agree with your analogy with Alien. That said, I think from a purely narrative POV the direction taken in Alien is clearer and more logical as the films intention is to focus on the 'visitor' that ends up resident on the Nostromo precisely because of the crews' panic. From that moment there is at least a cursory attempt to provide explanations to the audience via the crews efforts to understand their new 'guest' That aside, my issue I think is more that Scott et al have become somewhat constrained by having to shape and coerce the narrative to fit inside an already well recognised science fiction universe.

  • June 4, 2012, 10:47 a.m. CST

    My take on the 'Xenomorph' ending *spoilers*

    by david starling

    They put an alternate lifecycle to the 'Xenomorph' the movie: Holloway is infected, has sex with Shaw, she is impregnated with wierd 'squidhugger', which in turn (via a horrific sequence!!) impregnates space jockey, and wierd proto-xenomorph is born!! It can be viewed that this is severely fucking with what has already been set in stone, or merely the fact that hey, either we're being explained where the xenomorph evolved from, or being given an alternate take on things!! I mean, look at Alien, and the two different cuts - for me its the first cut every single time. But I can appreciate the barmy idea of how eggs are created - even if someone was smoking something at the time!! - because had it been kept in place, Aliens might have been radically different, not just an idea but a film completely. Then there's Alien 3 (which, if you care - I have a massive affection for), which at the time of release everyone argued "where was the second fucking facehugger?!!" - no-one questioned that the facehugger might have had to lay 2 eggs as it were - one for the queen, and due to the extended gestation period of said queen, another impregnation, to ensure that a warrior was present to guard the queens' host (and queen) from harm. Well, thats my take on it. And thinking about that, of the Alien movies my least favourite was Resurrection - it did present a (messed-up, if you think about it!!) twist (the whole thing with the Queen being pregnant!), but whereas the 3 before it gave us radical ideas, Resurrection didn't really.

  • June 4, 2012, 10:50 a.m. CST

    The Black Goo of Prometheus = The (Black) Monolith of 2001

    by fitz-hume

    The black goo is obviously born out of 2001's (black) monolith. Lindelof said that he and Ridley discussed a great deal about '2001: The Space Odyssey during the writing process'. Lindelof also said that the question you're supposed to ask after seeing the movie is (quote) "what does the blck goo do?".

  • June 4, 2012, 10:55 a.m. CST

    Fitz-Hume ... seems right to me

    by Arcane

    Not to mention the motivations of 'the Gods'

  • June 4, 2012, 10:57 a.m. CST

    One last thing - the crashed ship on LV426

    by david starling

    I never expected that to be answered, to be honest (at least not in this film, if there are to be more!!) - as said before, the answers a clear as to what the engineers are, and I don't think it needs to be detailed why a ship has crashed on LV426. It has, and we know that the pilot was infected.

  • June 4, 2012, 11:05 a.m. CST

    The Pedestals

    by Fatboy Roberts

    The Pedestals seem to house bio-weapons in their raw form. Whatever that oily black shit touches, it infects and weaponizes. It touches the worms - turns them into face-raping superworms that turn one of the scientists into a super-monster (and what was the deal with suggesting he crabwalked all the way to the ship, and then just having him stand up like a normal person before getting shot & flamethrowered?) It gets put in Holloway's drink - Holloway starts to break down. Whatever DNA shifts and changes inside Holloway are transferred to Shaw via sexual intercourse - which maybe explains why it goes from worm to sperm/squid thing? It is born, grows in size, reveals itself to be a proto-facehugger, facerapes Angry Engineer, from which a proto xenomorph bursts from the chest with what appears to be a rudimentary egg-sac protruding from its belly. So based on what the movie seems to provide as evidence - it's a form of bioweapon that not only alters the genetic structure of it's victim, it allows for the weapon to refine itself as it advances generationally, if that option presents itself. It is a multiple-stage bomb that deploys payloads via evolution.

  • June 4, 2012, 11:17 a.m. CST

    scratchmonkey

    by Sir Loin

    Terrific posts, I agree 100%!

  • June 4, 2012, 11:20 a.m. CST

    Saying that Ridley Scott "borrowed" from other works...

    by Chris Moody

    (because of similar themes)...is like saying that Shakespeare "borrowed" from his own plays -- given similar themes, story direction, styles and prose. For instance, several of Shakespeare's plays deal with themes about power struggles, women disguised as men, adulterous women (taboo in Elizabethan England) and arranged marriages. Did Shakespeare "borrow" from his own works? Or are these themes more transcending to the human experience? This is carried over in movie storytelling and mood. Every aliens-are-here film will inevitably be accused of "borrowing" from films like INDEPENDENCE DAY, MARS ATTACKS, SUPER 8 or ET, SIGNS, etc... Every shaky-camera "mockumentary" is compared with THE OFFICE and inevitably to THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT -- even though the technique had been used for decades prior to that film. These are common themes about how human beings in the future face discovery, mystery and the horrors of the unknown on another planet. Yet, themes and tone are not borrowed if they are universal. In fact, I recall reading reviews of GLADIATOR where Ridley Scott was accused of "borrowing" from BRAVEHEART. James Cameron is the first to admit when he uses such universal themes. He said that he pitched TITANIC as "Romeo and Juliett" on the HMS Titanic. They are similar themes. However, that doesn't mean that a film has exclusive "everything-else-is-off-limits" rights to such themes...or that what they are accused of having "borrowed" was anything other than universal ideas and notions. PROMETHEUS is what it is. It is a film that is best enjoyed if you forget that you ever watched ALIEN, ALIENS, ALIEN 3 or EVENT HORIZON. Even with all of the whining criticism about "borrowing" from other films, it is still 1000x better than 99.999% of the shit being released over the last decade. Like I said, I am convinced that many TBers would complain about CITIZEN KANE, THE GODFATHER, TERMINATOR, THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK, RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK and BLADE RUNNER if AICN existed at the time that those films were released. They wear their "bitch and moan" badge with pride...while the rest of us just roll our eyes. It is good to criticize a film...as long as we don't meander into simply whining about how we wanted it to turn out.

  • June 4, 2012, 11:21 a.m. CST

    Payloads via evolution...

    by Arcane

    Fatboy Roberts... I love your 'multiple-stage bomb that deploys payloads via evolution' description and think your logic is sound based on what we, the audience, have as our evidence onscreen. As a side note to that line of reasoning. Would it be possible that, assuming the 'engineers' prowess in the field of micro-genetic-engineering is so complete as to 'program' evolution, that the sudden appearance of the 'sperm-cephalod creature represents the freezing of embroynic development in human-beings at a stage that suits the 'living weapons' needs? It's interesting to note that in 'ancient astronaut' theory the idea that the creators of man botched several attempts to design homo sapiens 'in their image' and this, in return, results in various 'apocalyptic events' in which the flawed humans were wiped out in an attempt to start from scratch. Food for thought.

  • June 4, 2012, 11:23 a.m. CST

    Correction on payloads via evolution...

    by Arcane

    Fatboy Roberts... I love your 'multiple-stage bomb that deploys payloads via evolution' description and think your logic is sound based on what we, the audience, have as our evidence onscreen. As a side note to that line of reasoning. Would it be possible that, assuming the 'engineers' prowess in the field of micro-genetic-engineering is so complete as to 'program' evolution, that the sudden appearance of the 'sperm-cephalod creature represents the freezing of embroynic development in human-beings at a stage that suits the 'living weapons' needs? It's interesting to note that in 'ancient astronaut' theory the idea that the creators of man botched several attempts to design homo sapiens 'in their image' and this, in return, results in various 'apocalyptic events' in which the flawed humans were wiped out in an attempt to start from scratch, is quite common. Food for thought.

  • June 4, 2012, 12:25 p.m. CST

    My only major qualm with LOST...

    by Chris Moody

    ...was the manner by which they rushed the explanation of the mystery of the island. They tried to do this in a single episode. This could have been accomplished in at least TWO episodes and should have offered more explanation about who the people on the island were...and what motivated them to take care of the island. Other than that, I was happy with the way LOST turned out. Sure, I would have loved a few more "concrete" answers. However, no one asks the same type of full explanatory scenarios in the Illiad either.

  • June 4, 2012, 12:46 p.m. CST

    Why R s many of U clamoring for Cameron to return to this series???

    by AnarchyWorldsEnd

    The dude hasn't made an entertaining film since True Lies. That man left his balls/sense of humor/talent etc in the 90's.

  • June 4, 2012, 12:50 p.m. CST

    Film William Gibson's Alien 3 script and recast Ripley and Hicks

    by AnarchyWorldsEnd

    Then you'd have a real Sci-Fi action thriller. And Alien 3 is shit. Beatuifully filmed shit. But shit none the less. Requires massive suspension of disbelief for it's whole setup. Like they wouldn't have swept the Sulaco for for Aliens before CryoSleep??? And even if there were a few strays they would have at least cleared the CryoChamber. LAzy writing to setup the deaths of the characters we were so invested in. I don't mind a bleak film at all but ALien 3's script is shit. Period.

  • June 4, 2012, 12:54 p.m. CST

    The only guys who should be trusted with HALO...

    by Chris Moody

    ...are Ridley Scott or James Cameron.

  • June 4, 2012, 1:13 p.m. CST

    All these 'questions'......

    by daglesj

    ....sounds like trying to make excuses for badly thought out scripts with major plot-holes and lack of imagination. You know...like Lost. You did a deep enough hole for yourself script wise so you just keep on digging and making it up as you go along. Leaving the audience with more questions than answers is just sloppy and lazy. Not thought provoking or clever.

  • June 4, 2012, 1:20 p.m. CST

    good writing seems to be a lost art

    by WINONA_RYDERS_PUSSY_JUICE

    I knew this movie was going to be a disappointment. When has ANYONE gotten this genre right? The psychological sci fi metaphysical spiritual genre. Disappointment is part of growing up kids, now you have become men, jaded and cynical bastards. AICN welcomes you all with open arms!

  • June 4, 2012, 1:52 p.m. CST

    Saw it this afternoon

    by Mr Kite

    I've been looking forward to this movie for months and I am sorry to say I was very dissapointed. It just didn't work for me even though I really wanted to like it.

  • June 4, 2012, 2 p.m. CST

    The lifepods ... explained

    by No Respectable Gentleman

    Yep, v3d, yet another thing that annoyed the shit out of me the more I thought about it. The Prometheus doesn't have an escape shuttle like the Nostromo, you see, because that would mean Vickers would fly away and never be seen again. No, it has a full suite of rooms, including a medilab, that crashes onto the surface of the planet SO THAT WE CAN GET ONE FINAL SCENE WITH THE SQUID MONSTER (WHICH SHAW LEFT IN THE MEDILAB AND CONVENIENTLY DIDN'T KILL OR TELL ANYONE ABOUT -- AFTER SHE MIRACULOUSLY RECOVERED FROM SELF-INFLICTED SURGERY AND JOINED THE OTHERS IN THE TEMPLE). Further, Vickers doesn't eject from the Prometheus in this lifepod but separately, SO THAT SHE CAN BE CONVENIENTLY DISPATCHED BY THE FALLING ALIEN SHIP WITHOUT DAMAGING THE LIFEPOD WITH THE SQUID MONSTER THAT WE STILL NEED FOR THE FINAL SCENE. Oh, and this lifepod-suite was meant for Vickers alone(!) and has two years of supplies onboard. Though what good that would do, since it would take more than two years to mount a rescue mission, is anyone's guess (ALTHOUGH JUST MAYBE IT'S ENOUGH TO GET SHAW AND THE HEADLESS DAVID TO THE ENGINEERS' PLANET, WHERE PRESUMABLY THEY'LL BE WINED AND DINED WITH THE FINEST SPACE-JOCKEY CUISINE). Really. And people defend this movie?

  • June 4, 2012, 2:24 p.m. CST

    CONGCONGBO...

    by Johnny Wrong

    ...quoting Plato doesn't make you sound intelligent. Just pretentious. Also, if you were as smart as you're trying to make out, you'd have a better understanding of the word "kamikaze". The film's a mess. Get used to it.

  • June 4, 2012, 4:11 p.m. CST

    Lindeloff's fingerprints all over it...

    by Metebelis3

    Saw Prometheus at the London IMAX on Friday night - (packed house for the 21:20 showing by the way) <p>Depending on how well you felt the sub-plots and internal mysteries woven into LOST eventually played out and were resolved, will probably give some indication of your enjoyment of this movie.</p> Right from the very first scene, I shit you not, we get threads that are intentionally left to dangle. No explanantion, no hints, nada. Room for speculation? Sure A massively cynical attempt to hook you in for inevitable sequel? You fucking bet. <p>As entertaining as the movie is, and it IS a good watch at a basic level, and certainly well shot in terms of imagery (awesome in IMAX 3D by the way) and quite atmospheric at times with a palpable creeping dread, the 'sci-fi' parts of the story - the meat I was most looking forward to was constantly teased with threads or plot elements that were LEFT DANGLING as soon as they started to get interesting... <p> Everytime that happened I could here that grinning cunt's voice in my head saying "Don't worry, answers are coming - stick around for the next movie"... <p> Go eat a camel-dung sandwich.</p> You have no idea what you're going to do in the next movie, or even if there will BE one. To deliberately generate THAT many unresolved story elements in a movie is a fucking disgrace. It makes me sad that there are still people out there that think this 'Emperor' is actually wearing clothes. <p>Yes, the finest cloth in the land. <p>It does not take any skill or genius to write open-ended, unresolved, story elements when you have no intention of ever paying them off. <p> Looking forward to the 'maybe' ending of Prometheus 3 when Shaw emerges from a cryo-pod, staring off-camera into some blinding light, and says <p>"So, thats what its all about!" Crash cut to black. Roll credits. <p>All the TB'ers start selling the "It was always about the character journey" line.

  • June 4, 2012, 4:20 p.m. CST

    johnnywrong

    by james brook

    Well if the film's such a mess why did I enjoy myself so much more than I did in any other film this year? Perhaps Ridley Scott should have followed Hollywood convention and churned out a by-the-numbers ghost story in space or a simple war movie in space or maybe he should have just done a super hero film instead where the goodies win and the baddies get put in prison to think about what they've done. It would have been really satisfying like a Big Mac or a can of Pepsi or even a good wank. Then we could have all gone home and praised Ridley for making something simple and economical and fun. You see that's how you curry favor with the MAJORITY. You give them what they want. Instead, he gave us something challenging. And guess what, challenging things are difficult and not instantly rewarding. Give me a 50:50 split on rotten tomatoes any day. At least it guarantees healthy debate rather than uniform conformity. The fact is, challenging films are often derided by people that don't understand them. It is bigotry plain and simple. Much as black people used to be derided by white people because they represented something incomprehensible and threatening. I think they call that racism now. Some would call it tribalism or even nationalism. I like to call it simple-mindedness and it is that self-same pack mentality that overwhelms so many when they witness something that they find too strange to comprehend. Burn the witch, lynch the negro, shoot the terrorist. Down with Prometheus!!!! Well done guys, well done.

  • June 4, 2012, 4:28 p.m. CST

    Oh to be a (stupid) teenager again

    by Bill Inxs

    I saw Promethus last week in 3D. My first thought was ..........., next thoughts were what the fuck was the point of all the stupid characters and pointless plot twists. The film was stunning to look at (how much 3D helped... not sure) but what I can't get over is how stupid were the "scientists". I'm an engineer working in the oil industry with some seriously dodgy guys in some back water shit holes at the ass end of the world, and never have I seen engineers or scientist act like this. If I was spending a "Trillion Dollars" to find the meaning of life I think I wouldn't skimp on the people. Anway, lots of really cool things happened, lots of ideas and concepts I can't get out of my head, but still, what the fuck Ridley.... those characters were just wrong and most of the story was pointless. I can't remember when I first saw Alien, Aliens or Alien 3, but I did see Alien Reserrection in the cinema as soon it was released. Like most of the movies I saw as a kid/teenager, I liked them and if the effects were good, I was generally happy. Now I know too much and think too hard, so I'm always disappointed (thanks George, thanks James, now thanks Ridley). I just can't suspend disbelief enough when they write such pointless characters and stories that make no sense.

  • June 4, 2012, 4:29 p.m. CST

    CONGCONGBO...

    by Johnny Wrong

    ...but IT IS A BY-THE-NUMBERS HOLLYWOOD FILM. That is my point. It may ask far-reaching questions, but it never answers a single one, instead veering off into action/horror territory. A mess. If you'd ever been within a hundred miles of a real sci-fi book, you'd not be sticking up for this pretentious mess. The Hyperion Cantos is challenging...Prometheus is generic and boring.

  • June 4, 2012, 4:32 p.m. CST

    AND COMPARING DISLIKE OF A FILM TO RACISM...

    by Johnny Wrong

    ...shows just what an idiot you are. In fact you're just like this film. Of distinctly average intelligence pretending to be a great thinker. A try-hard.

  • June 4, 2012, 4:40 p.m. CST

    johnnywrong

    by Koyaanisqatsi

    The reason why the far-reaching questions are not answered: THERE ARE NO ANSWERS AND IF THERE WERE WE'D BE TOO STUPID TO COMPREHEND THEM. Jesus Fucking Christ, Prometheus isn't brilliant but it's LOADS better than almost anything else released this year. So it's a fucking B-movie with an A budget. How is that ANY different than Alien? Fucking idiots.

  • June 4, 2012, 4:41 p.m. CST

    Actually, I think I did go a bit too far. Sorry bro

    by james brook

    I will check out the Hyperion Cantos. I guess I just haven't seen a cool sci-film for ages and Prommy managed to push my buttons. Didn't you think any of it was cool??

  • June 4, 2012, 6:22 p.m. CST

    I DID LIKE PARTS OF IT...

    by Johnny Wrong

    ...which is ultimately why I find it so frustrating. Why I left the cinema feeling a little sad. Questions posed with no answers. Little flashes of brilliance which led nowhere. Embarassingly clunky dialogue that I'd have cringed at as a high-schooler. I'm hoping Ridley can pull a Kingdom Of Heaven with his director's cut. Still, though, I shouldn't have to hope for that. Oh, and koyaanisqatsi, go play in traffic, Lindelof apologist.

  • June 4, 2012, 7:52 p.m. CST

    I really wish Cameron would do "The Forever War" and not Scott.

    by SunTzu77

  • June 4, 2012, 8 p.m. CST

    I'm a huge Cameron fan, but for THE FOREVER WAR

    by lv_426

    I'd pick Duncan Jones at this point. I think Cameron is too invested in AVATAR and his other endeavors. We'll be maybe getting some AVATAR sequels, and if we're lucky BATTLE ANGEL. I think Cameron might make THE FOREVER WAR with the wrong tone. Now, a remake/serious non-satire adaptation of STARSHIP TROOPERS* or an adaptation of the novel ARMOR by John Steakley, done by Cameron would be amazing. * I do love Verhoeven's crazy satirical Starship Troopers movie just to be clear. I do think there is also room for a serious adaptation of it though too.

  • Ridley is a great "visual" director... but he can't judge a script or find the heart in a story.

  • The Road was damn good. I didn't read the book, but the movie was potent and really disturbing but not in a cheesy horror or zompocalypse movie sort of way. Reminded me of an even bleaker version of Children of Men. The Forever War is one of my favorite books. Not just science fiction but books in general. I was skimming through the beginning of John Steakley's Armor the other day, and the funny thing is with a few tweaks it could actually work as a massive scale Aliens sequel with a huge force of Colonial Marines in power armor fighting epic sized hordes of aliens on a hostile planet. The ants of Armor could be replaced with the xenomorphs of Aliens. I could see Cameron making an epic Aliens sequel using Armor as the basis and running with it.

  • June 4, 2012, 11:39 p.m. CST

    congcongbo has given us the Talkback Quote of the Year™, gents

    by Sir Loin

    "The fact is, challenging films are often derided by people that don't understand them. It is bigotry plain and simple." TA-DAAA! Get this etched in gold ASAP, it must be preserved for the ages. Such deep and thoughtful observation of those who have a different opinion than he does. P.S. LOL

  • June 5, 2012, 5:43 a.m. CST

    The next day

    by Mr Kite

    Its now almost 24 hours since I saw this film and I have had more time to think about it. Its F*%king awful. Phantom Menace, Crystal Skulls, Alien Resurrection level of crap. I saw it with my girlfriend and brother and they hated it as well. If you haven't seen it you may want to save your money. There is nothing clever about this film it is just a poorly scripted non event. The plot holes are massive and some of the decisions made by characters in the movie are beyond belief. Like I said in a previous post, I really wanted to enjoy this movie and I am very dissapointed that it turned out so badly. Trust me, the emperor is as naked as the day he was born!

  • June 5, 2012, 5:51 a.m. CST

    The high brow apologists are hilarious

    by cool_britannia79

    I wasn't bothered about the LOST finale but I gather it's the same wanabe cretins coming out of the woodwork with my first big book of prose to defend it?

  • June 5, 2012, 9:26 a.m. CST

    mr kite -- the 24 hour disappointing sequel hangover

    by lv_426

    Sounds like my experience with Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. I let myself be taken with the great trailer. I went with a friend of mine who is also a big Indy fan, and after seeing it, we didn't outright say it sucked CGI monkey nuts, but we knew that *something was wrong* if you will. The initial sign was when we were exiting the theater, the group behind us was starting to talk about the film, and one guy was asked by his friend what he thought of it and he just said blatantly answered with, *I fucking hate George Lucas*. It was straight and right to the point (although to be fair, Spielberg shares a lot of the blame for Crystal Skullfuck).

  • June 6, 2012, 4:14 p.m. CST

    I loved it, but most of you will hate it

    by Thall_Joben

    During the riginal Alien, I was pissed when they left the planet. I wanted them to stay and explore the alien ship. Once it became a 'run away from the scary monster' movie I was bored. This is the sequel I wanted. Only thing is - it's not a horror movie and there is zero suspence. Sure there are horrific moments, but that's all. If you're fine with that you can just enjoy the exploration, eye candy and mystery of it all for what it is. I loved it, it was two hours of exploring an alien ship, and that was plenty enough fun for me.

  • June 9, 2012, 1:41 a.m. CST

    pretty spot on actually and i can't wait to see it again

    by la te ral us