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Review

INCEPTION just never fully took with Harry

Now - before we get too far into this, let me explain what happened with INCEPTION, and why it has taken me so damn long to formally comment for y'all. The initial screening of INCEPTION I saw was about a week and a half prior to release, but was the day after the FAMOUS MONSTERS CONVENTION, which I absolutely got next to zero sleep during. Capone is a late night raider if you know what I mean. So there I was at 10am, a tad sore, and excited to see INCEPTION, but severely sleep deprived. Not a good state to be in for a movie about sleeping & dreaming. My initial impression, from that screening, where I missed easily 30-40 minutes due to napping... well, I thought the film was exquisitely crafted, meticulously slaved over - but honestly... it put me to sleep. And I don't sleep during movies. I'm the guy that does BUTT-NUMB-A-THON - this was a film that I was mad excited about, but it just felt like I was missing something that the world had attributed to the film. I decided that I couldn't review the film till I saw it fully charged and ready to go. That's when Comic Con slammed down upon me. Over the course of the next two to three weeks, the world conspired to keep me out of the theater. About a week ago, Yoko and I finally got back into the theater to see it. INCEPTION is a film made up of great performances by actors that I absolutely love. Seriously, Tom Hardy is going to own our shorts when George Miller unleashes him on FURY ROAD - of that I am positive. Marion is just amazing. The photography in INCEPTION is immaculate. The story is tight, intricate and the sort of story that promotes great conversations about the perceptions of what it all means. INCEPTION is a coffee house film discussion. But it still kind of underwhelms the shit out of me. None of the action, save for Joseph Gordon Levitt's amazing zero G hall fight is close to being amazing for me. In particular - I was incredibly disappointed by the Ski sequence. It was obviously ripped straight from the realm of James Bond, but I'm sorry - in ON HER MAJESTY"S SECRET SERVICE - it was done better, with more emotion, more at stake, more to care about. Because this is all a dream, I just don't invest weight into anything that is happening. I cared about Leo's tormented psyche in Scorsese's vastly superior SHUTTER ISLAND earlier this year. Here... I got no sense of who Leo and Marion were as a couple. All we get is the damaged reflection, of a guy who steals ideas... and here is planting an idea that isn't to end a war, to save anyone, but he's just a fucking corporate tool. Someone that is being sent in to destroy a company that has a rival company that wants to be more powerful. Fuck everyone involved. Seriously, I could care less about all of this. The most quotable line of the film is the "You mustn't be afraid to dream a little bigger, darling." well, that's the line that haunts the entire film for me. Tom Hardy delivers the line with relish, but even the punchline, pulling up that grenade launcher is... frankly lame. Because if you can "dream" a weapon up - that makes me wonder what the hell these people are doing dreaming up regular firearms. If it goes back to the notion of not wanting to call attention to the dream itself - well, after the Hotel layer, everybody involved in the Dream Sting is now fully aware that they are in a dream, so take the rails off. Let's dream BIG. And when I say dream big, I'm not talking about a subpar wannabe James Bond ski assault. I also got zero sense of research for these Dream Landscapes. There's nothing peppered from the targets interest. Other than a couple of business contacts. Does this guy not have a girlfriend, a best friend... anything? I mean, Ellen Page is an architect that creates a landscape for Cillian Murphy's character is supposed to project everything he is into. Apparently he's a guy that watches James Bond movies, cuz that's what he projects into his dream. I don't know. As much as I appreciate the loving care that everyone in this film put into this - it just doesn't work for me. Leo is acting his ass off here, but I don't know if I like his character. He's a pretty loathsome fella to me. I came away from INCEPTION, thinking about how much I prefer WIZARD OF OZ, DREAMSCAPE, SPELLBOUND, BRAINSTORM and NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET PART III: DREAM WARRIORS. There is more pure imagination at play when Ellen Page is first playing in the dream construct with Leo - than at any other point in the film. I kept wanting the world to be turned upon its ear. I wanted to see impossible things as simply the landscape for the mind. I don't know about you - but my dreams are influenced by artists, emotional states, memories both lived and watched... in dreams I can fly, the ground can suck you under, there's more to it than just putting one foot in front of the other. For a dream, INCEPTION is just too grounded. To Nolan I would repeat his own line, "You mustn't be afraid to dream a little bigger, darling." The reason that bugs me so is here we have a filmmaker that can capture in lucid clarity pretty much anything, and when he creates a property that could deliver anything, he delivers a very limited level of imagination. I found myself returning to Terry Gilliam's THE IMAGINARIUM OF DOCTOR PARNASSUS - where there's a far more personal, imaginative and superior imagination on display telling a greater metaphoric story and not getting half the response from folks. Of course - maybe these are the dreams of executives. In which case, I'll choose the dreams of artists. Every time.

Readers Talkback
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  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:10 p.m. CST

    FIRST

    by garybuseys_incisors

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:13 p.m. CST

    oh god

    by maxin n relaxin

    now that everyone is hating on inception harry had to throw in his 2 cents on why he hated it. if he wouldve been the first one to see it then he wouldve been all over this movie. i lose more and more respect for harry everyday cuz you can so obviously see through his bullshit

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:13 p.m. CST

    You have nothing to apoligize for...

    by Jobacca

    Nolan is overrated-sorry fanboys,its true. Both Batman Begins and the Dark Knight have some major flaws,one of which is...they're boring. Nolan is so intent on making everything "real" that he rejects everything thats made Batman popular in the comics for 60 years. Boring=Morgan Freeman monologuing for 20 minutes about where he got the tires for the Batmobile. Entertaining=Jack Nicholson asking "Where does he get those wonderful toys?". Nolan is pretentious,but all the fanboys refuse to see that the Emperor has no clothes. Just because something is "dark" or "serious" doesnt mean its also entertaining.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:14 p.m. CST

    Finally someone who isn't gaga over this overrated flick

    by The_Floating_Skull_of_Robert_Loggia

    I enjoyed Inception, very much like I enjoyed The Dark Knight, but neither were the be-all-end-all they were made out to be by rabid Nolan fanboys!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:15 p.m. CST

    Ooooh boy...

    by PULL_SMASH

    ...here comes the mob, and they got de torches. For the record, I didnt care if you EVER reviewed it. I liked it just fine without needing validation from anyone.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:15 p.m. CST

    INCEPTION ISNT OVERRATED

    by maxin n relaxin

    ITS EVERYONE ELSE WHO OVERRATED IT. IT WAS JUST A SOLID FILM, NOT A HOMERUN, JUST VERY WELL DONE AND CONSISTANT. BUT SINCE EVERYONE TALKED ABOUT IT, EVERYONE HATES IT NOW.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:16 p.m. CST

    Oh No Harry...

    by inb4scriptgirl

    I hope you're ready for a massive shit storm.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:16 p.m. CST

    I agree. I never felt Inception.

    by Orionsangels

    I left the theater feeling blah! I just didn't care about what was going on in the story. I found it boring.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:16 p.m. CST

    Agreed Harry!

    by Psycho_Kenshin

    Agreed completely

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:16 p.m. CST

    I guess I'm not that surprised...

    by Ribbons

    ...this reminds me of the whole "werewolves and vampires" part of Harry's Matrix Reloaded review. But he does have a point; for dreams, everything that happens in the movie is surprisingly earthbound. I still think it's an awesome meditation on individual reality, though.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:17 p.m. CST

    What really happened...

    by PorkChopXpress

    The movie fried Harry's brain and he is just now recovered enough to string sentences together that make sense (just take a look at his Expendables review for evidence of this).

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:17 p.m. CST

    too bad....

    by Beniffer

    I thought it was a great flick .. maybe not an instant classic .. but entertaining at the very least. I will get it when it comes out on Blu ... As for Pilgrim being better? .... different movie ... I'd watch both over multiple times ... and will be getting Pilgrim on Blu. Cera Vs. DeCaprio ... you be the judge

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:18 p.m. CST

    I agree!!!

    by RPLocke

    It's all a dream. It's worse than the ending of Lost. At least that happened.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:18 p.m. CST

    Thanks for being honest, Harry.

    by John_McClanes_Vest

    It's good to have this. And loved Expendibles!!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:19 p.m. CST

    "I cared about Leo's tormented psyche in Scorsese's vastly super

    by HorrorFan81

    Otherwise known as the quote that makes Harry Knowles completely irrelevant to me.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:20 p.m. CST

    superior SHUTTER ISLAND earlier this year.

    by HorrorFan81

    Finishing the quote.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:21 p.m. CST

    Pffft.

    by Gilkuliehe

    Well to me it is more a "heist" movie than it is a "dream" movie, and with that in mind I had absolutely no problem with the dreams being so "normal". Plus, they EXPLAIN in the movie that the people they're stealing from must not know they're dreaming... And how can you not love that gravity-less hallway sequence? First you disliked TOY STORY 3 beacuse the kid gave away his toys, now you fall asleep with this because there wasn't enough dreaming. And yet you loved A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET SHIT REMAKE. Well I guess I keep coming back here so the joke's on me. Oh and THE ILLUSIONIST is far better than THE PRESTIGE. Right.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:21 p.m. CST

    INCEPTION IS OVERRATED

    by Stifler's Mom

    good, yes. very good sporadically. but clunky and emotionally weightless. in my opinion.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:21 p.m. CST

    Best review ever, Harry.

    by Jaym3

    I quite enjoyed Inception, but I don't understand the hype at all. It felt cold to me and the same for you as well. Nolan has said his films are cold, but Inception was freaking freezing.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:21 p.m. CST

    So now some of you bitches can go and get stuffed!

    by HollywoodHellraiser

    The man had said his peace about Inception! Now you true haters of Harry can move on and bitch about something else!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:21 p.m. CST

    IMAGINARIUM...

    by Michael_Jacksons_Ghost

    Is a film that I really loved, and I really fell in love with the characters....where Inception was good, but boring. JGL and Tom Hardy were the actors that made me believe in the characters they played. Sure, zero-G fight in the hall shows the dedication JGL put into his character, and the stunts...but every actor in Imaginarium were very dedicated into the characters. Nolan has that great eye for scenery and scope, but in my eyes, Gilliam has a better one because of his own Imaginarium.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:21 p.m. CST

    "Too grounded"

    by PorkChopXpress

    I just can't even fathom how someone could have seen this movie and describe the dream state sequences as "too grounded in reality." The hotel near-zero-gravity fight scenes? What exactly did Harry expect, here, I wonder? And no, Harry...watch Dreamscape after seeing this movie and it will be Dreamscape that seems one-dimensional - and I have always loved that movie.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:21 p.m. CST

    Neverending Shaky Cam in Snow Fortress Level

    by Sujay

    Was the only thing that annoyed me in this otherwise great movie.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:22 p.m. CST

    Spoilers?

    by Shubniggorath

    Why is it when Harry reviews a movies I haven't seen, he writes a spoiler review. When it's something I saw twice a month and a half ago, no spoilers. I read movie reviews to help decide if I want to see something or not.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:22 p.m. CST

    You waited until it was cool to not like it

    by matthooper8

    That's the douchey thing to do. Now it's cool to not like it. There's a backlash of morons who don't get it. In no way is Harry a moron and I'm sure he gets it, but now it's cool to not like it. Why really the wait? Personally I think it's the best film since "There Will Be Blood". But I wouldn't wait to tell y'all that.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:22 p.m. CST

    Watching movies isn't a marathon sport.

    by Toilet_Terror

    You're doing it wrong.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:23 p.m. CST

    I See Your Points, In A Way

    by Crow3711

    But I also disagree. I think you can get as much out of Inception as you put into it. The characters are archetypes, cut outs devoid of personality for the most part, but that let me sort of imprint personalities onto them in a way. Aside from that, the real genius of it is that it adds weight to the idea that they aren't real people at all, just Leo's dream friends while hes stuck in Limbo. Anyway, glad to hear your thoughts finally big man, and i respect them. But at the same time, I almost always disagree with your reviews more than anyone else on the site, so I don't really think its accurate, personally. It's just hard to take seriously when you basically jerked off over The Expendables (with stallones dick in your mouth) but you find Inception underwhelming. Just a little incongruous, but everyone has an opinion. I mostly just feel bad you didn't see what I saw.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:23 p.m. CST

    BRAVO HARRY

    by PRESIDENT BALTAR

    THANK YOU FOR EXPOSING THIS VASTLY OVER RATED PIECE OF SHIT

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:24 p.m. CST

    Nightmare on Elm Street 3 is better?

    by zacdilone

    Harry...not cool.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:25 p.m. CST

    Harry, you are a dumb fuck

    by BP_drills_america_a_new_asshole

    You didn't understand it at all, did you? The subtleties, the subtext the visual nuances. It all went over your stupid fat head.<P>You spent the first few paragraphs making excuses why you didn't review it sooner, and when you DID finally get down to the nitty gritty its obvious you sat there open mouthed for two hours while Nolan fucked your primitive cerebrum with concepts you couldn't hope to appreciate in a million years.<P>This so-called review of yours should have been written in crayon. You wanted people to fly? Any credibility you had left as a reviewer has just flown away for good.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:25 p.m. CST

    sounds like Harry doesn't get the

    by STLost

    dream land. They can't mess too much with a person's dream, or the "projections" get suspicious and start attacking the outsiders, like white blood cells against infections.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:26 p.m. CST

    Well poop on you too, Harry.

    by Little Beavis

    I enjoyed the hell out of it. Yeah, the dream sequences could have been a little more trippy, but I think I would've had a seizure if they were!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:27 p.m. CST

    I was kinda expecting this would be his take...

    by The Dum Guy

    At, least he doesn't rush to say a movie is bad.<br><br>I liked Inception better than Expendables or Scott Pilgrim.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:27 p.m. CST

    THE TIME HAS FINALLY COME .....

    by GINGE_MUPPET

    Today is the day Harry is revealed to be a TOTAL movie idiot. LOL .... YOU JUST DIDN'T UNDERSTAND IT, did you?? Admit it fucker and stop hiding.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:28 p.m. CST

    Yes, the ski stuff in Inception was weak.

    by James_Camera_On

    No one said this is a flawless movie. There are in fact a lot of criticisms that can be made by an alert and informed critic who truly loves movies. Nolan worked on the script for 8 years and it shows. There is too much explanation, death to a movie screen play. Yet for all that, the movie is endlessly fascinating and warrants the full attention of anyone who loves movies (not that phrase). Writing "I don't get it." which is essence is what Harry just did, just doesn't cut it. It's so weak as to be embarrassing. This is a low point for AIC. Now back to our regularly scheduled Scott Pilgram plugging! -- which is bombing, btw.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:29 p.m. CST

    Yet you liked Expendables?

    by DarltonRapedMyAdulthood

    You jerk-off about Expendables for years and then give a clear biased review and then piss all over Inception the same time. Hard to follow the logic. Look the "hype" is coming from blogs and websites like this where critics and fanboys are trying to show off how smart they are. Almost all people i know went to the movie and really enjoyed it. That's that. That's not hype. That's good word of mouth. The movie is successful for a reason. People dug it. Don't lump in we fans of the movie with whoever is shoving the hype down your throats. Sounds more like a bitchy backlash because people can't stand when one of their own becomes mainstream popular. And Scott Pilgrim? Yeah all five people who saw it might agree that it's better.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:29 p.m. CST

    Dullception

    by TakingScorpiosCalls

    Everyone speaks very dull, everyone also strangely has this robotic motivation in this movie, no one says things like "hello, so how are you doing?" Its something like "we have to break the fourth dream wall and we cant to this because that" everyone hits the ground running when a convo starts up, also that creepy guy from Batman begins looks like a wax statue, and i couldnt concentrate on much except for Leo's furled brow and those two lines in between hish eyes.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:29 p.m. CST

    That should have been "note" not "not."

    by James_Camera_On

    Damn typos.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:30 p.m. CST

    This review could've been summed up as this:

    by HorrorFan81

    "I failed to pay attention. Therefore, I didn't like it."

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:30 p.m. CST

    It's overrated.

    by Nerd Rage

    It's a solid and crafty heist flick but it's not the be-all, end-all of intelligent cinema as some make it out to be.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:30 p.m. CST

    Not perfect, but...

    by Bob_Dole

    I expected to be blown away. Frankly, I wasn't - at least not for the entire flick. It was up an down. There were moments that made me giddy to the point of tears almost (shit blowing up in Paris in Ariadne's first dream experience), Zero G fight, the shot at the end...and other parts where I was like "God this could be so much better." The first 40 minutes were plodding. I appreciated the exposition the first time through, but I have seen it again and I must say it gets bogged down. Overall though It was a good-to-great movie. It just wasn't the total package. I've still spent more time reading reviews/interpretations for this than almost any movie I've ever seen, so it does have that going for it. I still like talking about it...

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:32 p.m. CST

    you can't mess around in the dreams

    by STLost

    and go totally apeshit, or the projections get wise and try to kick you out. They made that explicitly clear in the movie. Maybe in your own dream if you realized you were dreaming you could do some funky shit, but in other people's dreams you have to show some restraint.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:32 p.m. CST

    Hmm

    by Canuck815

    Count me in the 'enjoying it for what it was' group. Seeing it opening day was pretty nice cause I got to come to my own consensus before this seemingly hip backlash came up (even the constant debate over the final shot got pretty exaggerated). I agree with whoever up there just called it a Heist movie. I still really don't see why it's necessary for Harry to keep comparing every movie to it, it's just kinda rubbing in that it didn't take for him and it's only gonna create more shitstorms in here.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:34 p.m. CST

    Half agree with Harry

    by DinoBass

    Dream sequences always bleed out a little drama for me. Also, I thought that the balcony scene was setting up the main dilemma for DiCaprio: was HE still dreaming, and was the only way back to his kids going to be to kill himself? That never even came up as a possibility. I mean, what if DiCaprio kills himself to get back to his kids but the audience is left to decide whether he succeeded or simply committed suicide.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:34 p.m. CST

    there's NOT that much subtlety to Inception.

    by Stifler's Mom

    DENSE, yes. But SUBTLE and EMOTIONAL it's not. Just because some of us were completely underwhelmed by the movie didn't mean we didn't totally get it. Yeah yeah yeah, meditation on identity, dissection of reality, we fucking get it. Just not that impressed.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:35 p.m. CST

    BTW

    by Bob_Dole

    I haven't been completely blown away by a movie in the theater in a long time. Last one I can recall was maybe the first Matrix. I was also a teenager on psychotropic drugs too, so maybe I just needed something stronger than a flinstones chewable to be blown away by this...Good flick though, overall.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:35 p.m. CST

    Your Problem Harry

    by Black_Vulcan

    You're too emotional. Nolan is a fairly emotionless director. Who cares if Cillian Murphy ever had a girlfriend? This is a heist movie. Its about getting the quarry (or booty). Some people love to look at dreams as wonderous things where anything can happen. I think this movie just eschews fantasy for function.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:35 p.m. CST

    Actually Shutter Island is vastly inferior to Inception.

    by mortsleam

    This coming from someone who loves nearly every Scorsese movie more than life itself. Except that Buddha one. I even think that Shutter Island is a very well done movie. I certainly liked it a lot when I first saw it. I knew something was up from the beginning and was primed for a "twist" and had the whole thing pretty much figured out about a third of the way into it, but I still had a lot of fun getting to the end. The performances were great, the shots, the music, it was Scorsese firing on all cylinders. And at the time, was the best mind-fuck movie to come out this year.<p>Then Inception happened.<p>Tried to watch Shutter Island again afterwards on the divid. Just isn't happening. Still a great little thriller, but sadly doesn't hold a candle to Nolan's breathtaking imagery. I really liked all of the characters, from Cobb to Ariadne to Eames. Even Cillan Murphy's Fischer has some moments of real fun as he gets in on the plan and real pathos as he confronts the memory of his father and all of his father's perceived failings. In Shutter Island, the only character I felt anything for was Teddy's partner Chuck, and he doesn't even really exist.<p>There's nothing at stake with Cobb in Inception? Bullshit. If he doesn't succeed, he doesn't see his kids again. Or if it's all dream, if he never makes peace with his complicity in the death of his wife, he never wakes up again. Equally as heavy and tortured as what Teddy was dealing with in Shutter Island. And frankly, Marion Cotillard truly brought home the damaged psyche of Mal in a way that Michelle Williams creepy but still one-note "thriller" performance of the "crazy wife" just didn't. <p>I'll give you that the ski scene went on too long and wasn't inventive enough to compare with the rest of the movie. Tom Hardy tho played his part well. I just wish they'd actually shown the labyrinth that Ariadne had devised rather than sneaking through the back door. Then again, they had to set up that Cobb knew the way in so that Mal could confront him. Story wise, this had to happen. Doesn't make me 'dream' of a better set piece tho. <p>That doesn't really matter because by that time we'd seen a city fold in on itself, a breathless chase through a crowded city, a zero gravity fist fight ten times better than anything in the Matrix, the creation and destruction of an entire dreamcity, and the healing of two damaged people. <P>Too bad you didn't get all that, but maybe you dozed off during those scenes. For my money, this is the kind of thought-provoking, visionary, daring action I want to see, not some tired 80's action retread, full of bad writing, lazy plotting, tired acting, and horrendous cgi.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:38 p.m. CST

    Maybe the rumour Paprika movie...

    by HollywoodHellraiser

    will turn the dream world on its ear for you Harry! I'm hoping it will for me!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:38 p.m. CST

    I liked Shutter Island

    by RPLocke

    It almost worked as a cool Lost episode. You even had a Smoke Monster of sorts.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:39 p.m. CST

    He didn't like it...

    by jackalcack

    ...and couldn't even be arsed to review it properly. That's one of the shortest Harry reviews I've ever seen.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:40 p.m. CST

    Dream Warriors over Inception?

    by frankenberry

    You can dislike Inception if you want. But preferring Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors to it? Come on...

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:40 p.m. CST

    Harry, you ignorant slut...

    by jimmy rabbitte

    Actually it's OK. I like that I'm absolutely crazy about a movie that the whole doesn't necessarily love. I'm a little shocked when people don't get Inception; but hey, that's life.<p> I saw it, with a friend who agrees, with me on movies a good 90-95% of the time; and he didn't love it. Like Harry, he wants to see it a second time and try to figure out why I thought it was so great. For me, I loved that the dream element was so layered that you can argue that the entire thing was a dream designed to rescue Leo's character, from his crumbling dream world. That way Harry's hated corporate dickheads aren't really what's at stake; they are just pieces of an intricate rescue mission.<p> Anyway, good on ya, Harry, for not being a cinematic lemming, claiming to love a film just because everyone wants you to or thinks you should.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:40 p.m. CST

    "vastly superior"?

    by TheSeeker7

    Shutter Island to Inception? I seriously don't even know how to respond to that.<br> <br> But really, I'm beyond tired of the word "overrated", it's become the new favorite buzz word of the younger generation, plus it just seems like anything that really catches on with the masses automatically then is deemed as overrated just on principle, and that's really quite lame. For geeks, only a very limited number of people are allowed to like something to make it cool. If it gets too big it then becomes "overrated".

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:41 p.m. CST

    Shutter Island > Inception.

    by Stifler's Mom

    Scorsese took a tight little crime thriller and nailed it. Nolan aspired to do something huge and mind-bending and succeeded for the most part, but with some very big flaws. Winner: Scorsese.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:41 p.m. CST

    This review would hold more weight...

    by DunderMifflinIntern

    If Harry didn't like so much garbage.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:42 p.m. CST

    So basically Harrys saying

    by Seph_J

    Inception should have been bigger. What like... Transformers 2 bigger? <p> Honestly, turning the 'dream a little bigger' quote on Inception is crazy. I defy anyone to name another film from this year or the last 10 that 'DREAMED' bigger than Inception. <p> Harry fell asleep in Inception. <p> Harry took a piss at the exact moment when SlyWillisSchwarzenegger finally came together. <p> I'm afraid your heard doesn't really seem to be in this anymore. Perhaps you should hand the website over to... anyone else, and just concentrate on the monster magazine shit that you seem to care so much about. <p> Apologies if this post seems harsh, but saying that INCEPTION needed to dream a little larger is like saying The Notebook needed to be more emotionally manipulative. <p> Come on Harry, credit where credit is due. If you can wank off over The Expendables (which was hardly originaly) Surely INCEPTION (which is, imo the type of film with ideas which we unfortunately rarely get) deserves more than that. <p> A response, maybe?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:42 p.m. CST

    Re: Leo's is a corporate Tool

    by The Ringwraith

    I was confused by this the first time as well. I stepped out for a bloody bathroom break and missed one of the most important bits of info in the film - Ken Watanbe's character explaining that the Fisher company had so much control over the world's energy resources that they were going to destroy the world. Watanabe's character, I get the sense, is doing it more for this reason than just to make his company more competitive. So the ehole movie IS a fight to save the world!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:42 p.m. CST

    Someone who mantains a web us ugly as this...

    by Wonderboys

    ...is in no way capacitated to speak of something as beautiful as Inception. How can a guy who deliberately keep this ugly site feel capacitated to speak about art? Harry dont know shit about art, he only know about geeky stuff and overblown shitty movies... Way to go...

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:42 p.m. CST

    Cinematic lemming

    by DarltonRapedMyAdulthood

    Right he's an honorable chap that Harry. Like he's not giving Expendables all this press and positive buzz because Sly Stallone is his new pal. No sir, he's no lemming.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:42 p.m. CST

    I'm not usually a violent person

    by jackalcack

    but I'd really like to break Scottpilgrimfan's nose. <p> What a fucking annoying, attention seeking little cunt. Every time I turn around on this site him or one of his many aliases is there talking shit.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:42 p.m. CST

    Disagree

    by Thunderbolt Ross

    A lot of people seem to have this reaction that the dream worlds needed to be more imaginative aka trippier or crazy or whatever. Clearly that was not the point as there was absolutely NOTHING like that in the dreams. Why take them to task for not doing it the way you'd like it to be done? <p>Besides that it would defeat the purpose of having ambiguity between what is not real and what is if it was patently obvious thanks to surreal, typical dreamlike imagery. I think the movie was terrific but if someone has problems with it I understand, of course. I just think this particular gripe isn't legit.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:43 p.m. CST

    Totally agree with your main point, Harry

    by Hardboiled Wonderland

    I didn't like Inception as much as I thought I would. I thought I'd love it, but I left the cinema thinking it wasn't as good as it could have been. Too much Bond action imho, and not enough of the lucid dreaming stuff. I also think the corporate glass-and-steel setting may have contributed to my ambivelance. Watch Paprika by Satoshi Kon, and THAT is what you do with a 'lucid dream' story! It may also be because I just watched Shutter Island a few weeks before Inception, and from the fog-horn like score to the reality-bending and dark secret with his wife -- it was probably too much of the same for Leo. I still enjoyed Inception -- the hotel fight scene is worth the price of admission alone! -- but it just didn't move my world like the Matrix or Paprika.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:44 p.m. CST

    Guess who didn't get a set visit...

    by slickjohnny

    I usually fall asleep during the name dropping and wandering personal stories that fill out the majority of Harry's bloated reviews.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:45 p.m. CST

    PS Was Leo channeling Jack Nicholson in Inception

    by Hardboiled Wonderland

    Or was that just me?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:45 p.m. CST

    the last scene in the film is what really makes

    by robamenta

    it a classic. I've seen inception 3 times now and I find the last scene more haunting and moving each time I see it. It is very open ended and tragic / sad. Dom may have had the happy ending he was hoping for, but we as the viewer will never know since the film cuts just as we are about to find out if what he is experiencing is 'real'. He may have given up and decided any type of experience where he is with his children is enough for him. All reality is subjective since we are slaves to our senses and can never really know if what we perceive to be reality is just that. We are all Dom lost in limbo and having to decide what we want to believe to make life bearable. Very rarely have a film touched such a deep part of me like this and expose this haunting truth of what it means to be human.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:45 p.m. CST

    Where is der brain

    by agisthos

    Yes Harry you just go back to watching Van Helsing and leave the amazing and intelligent films to us.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:46 p.m. CST

    Finally!!!

    by DudDude

    This is the first "Inception" review I've read that perfectly captures my thoughts on this over-hyped film. Thanks Harry... You nailed it!!!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:47 p.m. CST

    re: DarltonRapedMyAdulthood

    by jimmy rabbitte

    With respect, your assertions wouldn't make Harry a lemming so much as a sycophant or possibly a leech; but certainly not a lemming.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:47 p.m. CST

    Harry = the dumb girlfriend

    by BP_drills_america_a_new_asshole

    We've all had one, the dumb girlfriend you take the movies and have to explain everything to. This review could have been written by a stupid blond bitch. Harry equals the brain of a stupid blonde bitch inside the body of a fat cunt.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:49 p.m. CST

    "and leave the amazing and intelligent films to us. "

    by TakingScorpiosCalls

    Yep Inception sucked.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:49 p.m. CST

    Inception reminds me of Star Trek Generations

    by RPLocke

    when Kirk and Picard get caught up in a deamworld Nexus.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:50 p.m. CST

    PS Zimmer's score made Inception

    by Hardboiled Wonderland

    Watch Inception again, but LISTEN, don't just watch. Zimmer's score is a movie in itself, the way it alerts you to different levels of dreaming/reality, and Leo's state of mind. Brilliant work by one of the best composers in the industry.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:50 p.m. CST

    Where's Waldo except you try to find dream sequences

    by Nerd Rage

    that's about as deep as the movie gets.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:52 p.m. CST

    agree

    by dang2010

    I don't mind if people love Inception, it was certainly different. That being said, there were parts I found to be ridiculous. What the hell is the technology they are using? How the hell is Ellen Page "architecting" the levels? What is she studying in college that makes her so profoundly talented in creating this dream world? All of the characters were somewhat boring and stock, played by wonderful actors. Ellen Page was just a perky college student, third rock kid was a guy in a suit. That being said, I will still buy it on DVD and watch it again, because there was more good stuff in it to interest me than ... geez, 99 percent of the movies out there.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:52 p.m. CST

    Never thought I'd see the day.

    by Sailor Rip

    Where's the Ed McMahon obit?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:53 p.m. CST

    Best score ever

    by agisthos

    Right with you Hardboiled, it's an utterly amazing score that fits the scenes of images perfectly.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:54 p.m. CST

    Good review, Harry!

    by Chuck_Chuckwalla

    First of all, I loved the movie. Loved it. But I don't think it's a masterpiece. The problem is the amount of disbelief you're willing to suspend and if you're willing to accept the internal logic of the movie. Well, I loved it for what it was — a ride — but once you start dissecting it then it doesn't make much sense. And I think you nailed it on the head. If conjuring up a better gun can be done in another person's dream then why not take it further and fly? Why not make yourself invisible? There's also the premise of the dream layers. Leo does a phenomenal acting job of selling the idea but it seems a bit to clinical to me. It's almost as if it's a known scientific fact in this world that there are dream layers and that for each one time slows down as you enter it with exactly the same amount of time. It makes me wonder about how many people have actually done it and if there test studies to prove it? Like I said, loved it for what it was meant to be, a ride. The problem is the rules that they make up for the world.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:54 p.m. CST

    There's always one isn't there.

    by Dolmes

    For Kick-Ass there was Christopher Tookey For The Dark Knight there was Jonathan Ross For Inception it's Harry Knowles He'll see it again in a few months on Blu-ray and go "Oh it IS better than The Forgettables"

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:56 p.m. CST

    re: Zimmer's score

    by Hardboiled Wonderland

    My memory's hazy, but Zimmer's score covered the entire running time, right? That's an incredible job, considering what he had to make the music do.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:57 p.m. CST

    Harry, thine credibility ist lost

    by jimmay

    You proclaimed Scott Pilgrim the best movie of the summer before you even saw it, and openly admit to sleeping through large tracks of inception. There are times you almost, repeat almost sound like a real critic, then you blow it all away by posting fanboy gush all over the place for films you've convinced yourself are great well before you ever see them. I wonder, at this point, why you even bother watching the damn movies. You clearly form your opinion before you see them and adjust your perception while watching accordingly. <p>Since you know the quality of new films without seeing them, what's the best movie of the fall oscar season Harry?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:58 p.m. CST

    this is the review of a child...

    by chains

    ...trying to understand a film about adult concepts. seriously, I love this site sometimes, but Harry's inability to grasp concepts outside of guns, vampires, explosives and killer robots leaves much to be desired. this move requires you to think - and when there isn't a lot going on intellectually inside one's mind, it will, well... put you to sleep.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:58 p.m. CST

    Chuck_Chuckwalla

    by Seph_J

    Surely every film is only good 'for what it is' and 'based on the rules of it's world'? That can never be a reason why is doesn't work.. especially in fantasy of sci-fi. <p> Were the rules in Inception explained properly? I think so. So what's the bitch about? You just didn't like them? That is personal preference my friend. If you don't like laser-swords, then Star Wars is probably gonna be crap.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 7:59 p.m. CST

    "zero gravity fist fight ten times better than anything in the M

    by Nerd Rage

    uh, when's the last time you watched the Matrix?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8 p.m. CST

    You can only watch a movie for the first time once

    by I87D

    I'm sorry you screwed yourself over by watching it under less-than-ideal circumstances, Harry. I have a feeling you would've liked it more had you seen it with both fresh eyes and an unspoiled mind...

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8 p.m. CST

    i must be a hipster

    by vagrant

    saw it and was not blown away,why do people presume if you dont like it you dont get it?,nolan couldve dreamt of anything..and apparently he watched a bunch of heist films before he went to sleep.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:01 p.m. CST

    Harry, nooooooo

    by Yeah I Wrote That

    This movie is a calculated look at dream manipulation...NOT a free-for-all dream-anything type of flick. I suspect you might come to disown this review at some point. The script goes to great lengths to explain the rules. The "you mustn't be afraid to dream a little bigger" line tripped me up only in the trailer. Say someone were to dream up a fucking robotic Tony Jaa with laser-beam eyes, the projections would flip their shit and destroy every foreign presence. They need to operate stealthily. They are professionals. Also, just because the characters are within a dream does not mean there is nothing at stake. To me, the prospect of limbo sounds far more terrifying than the quick death a gunshot to the head might bring about. This is a movie/puzzle that sticks to its rules, ALWAYS, which is why it's solve-able.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:01 p.m. CST

    I'm reminded of Idiocracy...

    by PorkChopXpress

    Where everyone is so stupid that anything remotely approximating intelligence is derided as "gay" - and then everyone laughs hysterically at a guy getting variously racked in the nuts, in the top rated show on television. I see Harry heap raves upon The Expendables, then turning around to claim Inception didn't deliver, and why weren't people flying in the dreams...while the masses of mouth-breathers cheer him on in moronic agreement. Mike Judge was right, we're doomed. Go watch a Wayans brothers flick, dummies.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:02 p.m. CST

    Inception > Matrix

    by SirBiatchReturns

    if you're swallowing Nolan.<p>The Matrix is better in EVERY conceivable way as a film, in terms of execution of a "dreamlike" concept. Even Dark City as a whole is much better than Inception.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:02 p.m. CST

    my two cents or what is overhype

    by Ogmios_the_Eloquent

    my thesis is this: everyone who saw Inception before it was hailed as a masterpiece had the time of their life. We all knew how cool it looked from the trailer(s) but we only really understood the depth of the movie once we saw it. And then, after getting blown away, we all told our friends who what happened to us on that faithful day. And because they had been prepared for it, they didn't experienced it the same way we did, hence to them, it is overated. But truth be told, what you call overated movies are actually greatly admired movies, it's just you who don't get it because you received feedback before seeing the movie for yoursefl. Face it, you ruinued it for yourself and now you think Inception is pretentious. I was all in for Pilgrim but now that i saw some people saying its better than Inception, i probably won't like it as much as i would have if i stayed away from this site and others like it. The comparison will kill it. And this, l&g, was my two cents.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:03 p.m. CST

    WOW!!!!!!

    by drumdaddy60

    How can a guy that runs a site primarily about cinema have no real grasp about what is good and what isn't. I'm not saying that Inception was the best movie ever made but it was a pretty damn good one. Also, the comparison the Nightmare on Elm Street 3 made me laugh. Keep the jokes coming!!!!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:03 p.m. CST

    Yeah I Wrote That & PorkChopXpress

    by Seph_J

    thank you.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:03 p.m. CST

    Harry must be right!

    by cookylamoo

    He had himself declared sane by THREE DIFFERENT DOCTORS!!!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:04 p.m. CST

    i enjoyed it more the second time i watched it

    by antonphd

    it feels like a movie you need to be in the right mood for though. it is kind of like fargo to me. which itself felt like a dream of a movie. i am convinced that the entire movie is a dream and that his wife is not even dead and the whole technology does not even exist in real life. it's all just a dream about how one might deal with death. i really love it. but i admit i had more fun with Van Helsing. as did you Harry. i think we both just have a more hyper imagination than Nolan. Nolan is anything but hyper.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:05 p.m. CST

    Harry wanted vampires and werewolves in

    by Sailor Rip

    The Matrix Revolutions. Not to say it wouldn't have been an improvement but....

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:05 p.m. CST

    I can't believe people are so furious about this

    by CountryBoy

    If you love the movie, who cares what Harry thinks? You all sound insecure, as if you needed validation and, not having gotten it, are freaking out.<p>The movie was only okay IMO. Great hotel fight, some cool shots... I actually liked the scene in the vault with the dying dad, it seeemed plenty emotional to me. But I too was annoyed at the blandness of the dreams. The excuse that the mark had to think it was real seems, to me, disingenuous: as if Nolan added that specifically to cover his lack of imagination in those sequences. Indeed, Cobb even says outright that you never realize until you wake up that "anything was strange." They could have done so much more with this...

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:06 p.m. CST

    lol Nerd Rage, that Matrix comparison made no sense

    by SirBiatchReturns

    I can actually picture mortsleam watching bullet time and saying "ho hum."<p>then watch Levitt float in a hotel and go "OMG! THAT WAS FUCKING AMAZING!"<p>lmao. To be clear, I'm not making fun of that particular scene. It was alright (not amazing). But to say it was ten times better than anything in the Matrix is really to be riding Nolan hard. especially when the influence of the Matrix on this film is clear.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:06 p.m. CST

    Inception 2

    by Seph_J

    DiCaprio's crazy wife turns up at the wrong moment again... but this time a bolt of lightening places a wand in his hand and he declares himself "THE WIZARD MASTER!" <P> Oh and Harrys awake again!!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:07 p.m. CST

    Ugh, Harry's reviews ARE the worst

    by jimmy_009

    Shutter Island is better than Inception? In what universe? Shutter Island is a grade B "thriller" with no real thrills and a "mystery" that my wife guessed as soon as they landed on the island and I had figured out half way through. If it didn't have DiCaprio and Scorsese attached it would have been instantly forgotten and probably straight to DVD. God, just an awful review, man. The only thing I do agree with is the ski scene could have been better, but the only reason I think so is that I couldn't tell who the hell was who. Other than that it's a perfect fucking movie. Didn't you give Armageddon a good review? You have zero cred with me.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:07 p.m. CST

    Hahahaha Harry is officially a retard!

    by sansara07

    What's the matter big guy? Inception didn't have enough blue people for ya? You "LOVED" Avatar's story but hated Inception? Not enough bright colors to keep your spasticated brain occupied?<P>Don't worry Harold, the Avatar re-release is just around the corner so dry your little eyes. Brain still hurting after Inception? Awwwwww. Avatar will make it all better for you. Blue people jumping around, that's what our Harry loves!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:08 p.m. CST

    spasticated brain

    by Seph_J

    lol

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:08 p.m. CST

    It wasn't really a movie about dreaming...

    by The Dum Guy

    It was a heist film that used dreams as the crux of the plot.<br><br>I can see how if you expect the movie to be surreal it would dissappoint.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:08 p.m. CST

    Fanboy Rage

    by maxwell's hammer

    Classic Fanboy:<BR> <BR> * Not seeing a movie and having no basis on which to criticize it, but bad-mouthing it anyway and justifying their non-opinion by citing bad box office (ex: Scott Pilgrim)<BR> <BR> * Selecting a genre film with decent acting and direction and imagination and declaring it THE BEST FILM EVER OMFG!!! and if you don't agree with them, then you're a fucktard who JUST DOESN'T GET IT!!! (ex: Inception)<BR> <BR> And on a sidenote, I liked 'Inception' more than Harry did, but I basically agree with the essence of all his complaints. And 'Shutter Island' is definitely the supiorior movie.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:09 p.m. CST

    harry i love you but..

    by Errockk

    it seems in parts of this review you did't fully understand the rules that Nolan created for his dream world...

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:09 p.m. CST

    I had some of those exact same complaints, but...

    by FlickaPoo

    ...it just knocked it down from ★★★★★ down to ★★★★☆.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:09 p.m. CST

    Harry: Write Nolan a letter

    by kolchak

    And ask him to release a cut on DVD that features on-screen "KA-POW"s and awkward teenagers. Then your attention will be held.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:10 p.m. CST

    Shut the fuck up you douchebags....

    by Jobacca

    With all of your..."No...you just didnt GET IT. Inception(and the Dark Knight) are too SMART for you." No...we "got it" just fine. We just didnt like it. And you sound like pretentious Nolan ass-lickers when you claim to be smarter than everyone else.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:11 p.m. CST

    The phrase "sorry fanboys"...

    by ROBRAM89

    ...has never preceded a statement that wasn't stupid.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:12 p.m. CST

    My sentiments exactly.

    by JuicyFruit

    Spot on Harry. The movie did nothing for me. I didn't find it complex. It did not captivate me. And it wasn't terribly original.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:13 p.m. CST

    This is why Harry's reviews are pointless

    by Brosefulae

    They are inconsistent and illogical. But thanks for creating this site!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:14 p.m. CST

    It seems a lot of people here want dreamy, surrealism

    by jimmay

    They already made that movie, it was called What Dreams May Come. And, simply put, it wasn't very good. This whole review reminds me of Harry's review for the last Harry Potter film. One it got dark and serious and wasn't all candy and childish whimsy and wide-eyed wonder, Harry completely checked out. He has the mind of a child.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:15 p.m. CST

    Shutter Island is instantly forgettable

    by jimmy_009

    I'm sorry, but after I saw it I couldn't figure out why either Leo or Scorsese would attach themselves to such a hackneyed "twist" movie. You actually felt there was some connection between Leo and his dead wife in that movie? Really? She just came off as some crazy bitch. The part where he's screaming while picking up his dead kids in the water reminded me of the same feeling I got while watching Tom Cruise dance at a nightclub with a mask on: these guys should have known better. The ONLY thing I think Shutter Island had going for it was the decision Leo made in the end. Other than that it was predictable and WAY overproduced for what it was. I can see myself popping in the blu-ray for Inception now and then, but why the FUCK would I ever rewatch the depressing dreck that is Shutter Island again? You guys are way off.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:15 p.m. CST

    Moriarty / Harry

    by Seph_J

    Drew McWeeny: "...a logical and orderly descent into a trippy but airtight exploration of the way we frequently chase illusory versions of the people in our lives while ignoring the real flesh-and-blood imperfections that we don't want to acknowledge." <p> Harry Knowles: "My initial impression, from that screening, where I missed easily 30-40 minutes due to napping... well, I thought the film was exquisitely crafted, meticulously slaved over - but honestly... it put me to sleep. And I don't sleep during movies." <p> Drew McWeeny: "Inception is an exhilarating cinematic experience that suggests there is still room, even in the blockbuster world, for big ideas and dangerous emotions, and that may be the single most thrilling thing about it." <p> Harry Knowles: "For a dream, INCEPTION is just too grounded. To Nolan I would repeat his own line, "You mustn't be afraid to dream a little bigger, darling." "<p> <p> Says it all really doesn't it.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:17 p.m. CST

    harry...foot in your mouth

    by Clockwork Taxi

    oh christ. Harry you really missed the point on this one. I know it wasn't GI JOE and it hurt your ADD, but really????? Wow. Harry, harry, harry. Worst review ever.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:17 p.m. CST

    ...ultimately, only Level 3 was a disappointment...

    by FlickaPoo

    ...most of the team's work involves fooling the victim into not realizing they're dreaming...hence the realistic scenarios.<P> But they spent a lot of time building up the dread and anticipation for Level 3...and at that point Murphy knows what is going on. All hell should have broken loose.<P> Limbo was a bit of a disappointment too, although I can see why they treated it the way they did. As initially described, Limbo seemed truly chilling...a psychological version of the Christian hell. Die in the dream, and spend all eternity in a place where hope and logic have no meaning...

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:18 p.m. CST

    Valid

    by Waspo

    Those complaints are valid. I would say that since everything is neatly explained in the movie that you should look at it from that perspective. I do agree that we don't get enough time with Cobb and his wife, but because I think the rest of the movie is so well done, and so well crafted, I can forgive a little character development issues. Neverthless, this is one of my favorite movies of the years and everyone that I have talked to either loves the movie or really likes the movie.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:18 p.m. CST

    I'm finished!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    by Sailor Rip

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:19 p.m. CST

    Wow.

    by ccchhhrrriiisssm

    I am disappointed, Harry. But to each his own. I disagree with the Academy on most of their choices for awards too.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:20 p.m. CST

    Thanks for the dissent, though I liked it a bit better...

    by lettersoftransit

    ...than you did. In the days after this I had to keep my thoughts pretty much to myself for fear of being told I wasn't able to follow it or something. But that was the problem. I followed it so easily that I saw huge plot holes, devices used for contradictory results, and more. And I get that it's a useful story trick to make scifi more accessible by grounding it in a simple story, but I think he's in danger of being the guy who always takes that concept too far. Dreams can be invaded, shared, manipulated and on top of all that can do so on multiple levels... and all we're doing with it is corporate espionage? That's almost as bad taking a story in which a guy has invented a teleporter, and nobody seems able to come up with any better or more interesting use for it than to create a magic show.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:20 p.m. CST

    GREAT review that sums up everything

    by altoandando

    I felt about it. that's why I've been coming to this website for over 40 years.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:20 p.m. CST

    Thank you Harry, you've been redeemed in my BOOK!

    by ganymede3010

    Fuck all of these Nolan dick-riders lol!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:20 p.m. CST

    Seph

    by maxwell's hammer

    It says that two critics disagreed about a movie after watching it.<BR> <BR> Harry actually waited to review it until he'd had an opportunity to see it again under more favorable circumstances. But you didn't realize that because you're a tool with with mad willfully- misconstruing skillz.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:22 p.m. CST

    the 'professional' film critic

    by Seph_J

    waited before he could be bothered to WAKE THE FUCK UP before he reviewed a film? <p> How decent of him.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:24 p.m. CST

    Harry was paying more attention to his corndog

    by BP_drills_america_a_new_asshole

    than to the film. ** Homer Simpson voice ** "Yummy yummy corndog!"<P>Harry looks at screen.<P>Corporate es-pi-o-nage. Dream ar-ch-i-tec...<P>Harry looks back at corndog.<P>"Yummy corndog!"<P>Looks at Yoko.<P>Looks at Yoko.<P>"Mommy, I'm bored. Can we go home now?"

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:25 p.m. CST

    ...well, and the first third was awfully heavy on...

    by FlickaPoo

    ...exposition. Would have been better if they could have figured out a way to cut some of that.<P> Still, very good movie.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:25 p.m. CST

    and thats the nail in the coffin for me taking harrys opinion...

    by thewizardofoz

    ...really? nightmare on elm street 3? really? Imaginarium was a mess of imagery with no characters, no emotions, no comprehensible story tying it together. I did get some good zzz's during that one, however.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:25 p.m. CST

    Completely agree with Harry

    by SingingConan

    Finally, someone nailed it.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:26 p.m. CST

    Interesting

    by redkamel

    Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus is the example I use to show how movie dreams are fake...cause no ones dreams look that crazy, and if they do, they can't look the same. So trying to "portray a dream" is impossible. Unless you go the inception route...because my dreams DO look and feel real. Maybe in different times or places, but they are usually consistient. Unlike the surrealistic ones of Dr. Parnassus. And I suspect many other peoples dreams do too. Coupled with a logical reason to make the dreams be realisitc, and the fact that it was a heist movie about false reality and I thought it was done well.<p> Also, I never saw Shutter Island. Mostly because I guessed the twist from the trailer. I asked my friend to check for me and I was right. Why see a movie hinging on a "mystery" I can solve from the trailer?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:26 p.m. CST

    ...INCEPTION is a really hard movie to figure out...

    by FlickaPoo

    &thinsp;&zwj;&zwj;&zwj;&zwj;<br>...when to sneak out for a fucking piss!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:27 p.m. CST

    Maybe if it had more 80's nostlogia

    by DigitalDong

    It seems anything that reminds people how they wasted their childhoods gets the originality/creative stamp around here.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:27 p.m. CST

    SCOTTPILGRIMFAN = PEDOPHILE FAGGOT SHIT EATING CUNT

    by MJs_Cold_Dead_Pale_Corpse

    FACT

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:27 p.m. CST

    What Dreams May Come

    by The Dum Guy

    Wasn't that bad, but had nothing to do with actual dreams (maybe, lucid dreams).<br><br>I'd rate Waking Life better at being a dream movie over any of the Nightmare movies.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:27 p.m. CST

    How incredibly divisive!

    by Seph_J

    Posts are alternating between "Harry now has zero cred" and "wow harry nailed it". <p> I think the point that the haters are missing is this: Was Inception the type of film we should be encouraging hollywood to make, or is Transformers 2 the type of film we should be encouraging them to do?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:27 p.m. CST

    Yeah, I didn't "get" INCEPTION either...

    by Purple_Tentacle

    ...and I'm not afraid to admit it. It seems to gloss over the most interesting aspects of the concept. And the characters are so poorly developed, there's no way of becoming involved in the story. The Matrix, Eternal Sunshine, Being John Malkovich, Vanilla Sky, hell even Total Recall dealt with incredibly similar ideas so much more effectively and interestingly.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:28 p.m. CST

    This coming from a guy who ranted about The Expendables.....

    by Bruda5000

    Harry while I agree that Inception is from from bring the greatest film ever made, it is leaps and bounds better than The Expendables. I sometimes question your taste. This being one of those times.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:28 p.m. CST

    Seph

    by maxwell's hammer

    Um. Yes, that is decent of him. I'd think you were a total dick if you pulled an all-nighter, got no sleep, was dragged to a movie that you couldn't keep your eyes awake through, then used that single viewing as a basis for an informed opinion.<BR> <BR> I'd much prefer you wait until you had a chance to see the film while wide awake and in command of all your mental faculties before you shared with me what you truly thought about a film.<BR> <BR> Just because you complain with all caps and use swear words doesn't make everything you say self-evidently true.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:29 p.m. CST

    Oh dear.

    by palimpsest

    Is that it? Is that really the best that you can do after three weeks and saying that you needed more time and a second viewing to properly coalesce your thoughts? After posting at 5.19am last Tuesday that you were right on this review to piss that out on Saturday? Another burn notice has been served.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:29 p.m. CST

    Fliackapoo...

    by Red Ned Lynch

    ...I was going to write something very long. Because, as you know, that's what I mostly do. But then I saw your brilliantly succinct post above. <p> What Flickapoo said, except I always use a ten point scale and would say about seven. <p> Thanks Flickapoo, on behalf of anyone who would have had to wade through my post.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:29 p.m. CST

    by Xanthos Samurai

    I got as far as "I cared about Leo's tormented psyche in Scorsese's vastly superior SHUTTER ISLAND earlier this year." and then had to stop reading. I respect your viewpoint, Harry, but Shutter Island was one of the most mis-advertised, dragging letdowns I've seen in a long time. There's no denying that there are thematic siilarities between it and Inception, but Inception is a far superior movie. End of story.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:29 p.m. CST

    Y'ALL N-WORDS POSTIN' IN A TROLL THREAD...

    by BurnHollywood

    Oh, Harry...you are a wicked genius...<p> I hope everyone is enjoying what will surely be the longest TalkBack in AICN history, already in progress...

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:29 p.m. CST

    Michael Bay is like the Hitler of Talkback

    by Bob_Dole

    Godwins Law...

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:30 p.m. CST

    Gilliam > Nolan

    by Mockingbuddha

    I really enjoyed Inception, I have lucid dreams sometimes, and the other characters in my dreams get EXTREMELY upset when I fly or whatever, that aspect of the movie alone had me hooked, but Harry is right, Parnasus kicks Inceptions ass in EVERY way, better acting, better dreams, better themes. Tom Waits. Spider-kid. Better looking girl. What else... oh yeah there was a fantabulous lack of dicaprio in Parnasus, which is my main yardstick for any movie. Also Harry was right about the Zero G Fight. It ruled. I wish they put that in Parnasus, just no explanation at all put that scene somewhere in the middle, then back to the story.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:31 p.m. CST

    maxwell

    by Seph_J

    I'd much prefer that a film critic went to a film screening expecting to actually WATCH the film... not sleep during most of it and remember a few bits which then seem boring the second time because you've already seen them once. <p> Obviously your opinion of the film, and your investment in what is going on is going to suffer. <P> And by the way, its really cool to throw an insult at the person you are replying to each time. Keep it up.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:31 p.m. CST

    maxwell

    by Seph_J

    I'd much prefer that a film critic went to a film screening expecting to actually WATCH the film... not sleep during most of it and remember a few bits which then seem boring the second time because you've already seen them once. <p> Obviously your opinion of the film, and your investment in what is going on is going to suffer. <P> And by the way, its really cool to throw an insult at the person you are replying to each time. Keep it up.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:31 p.m. CST

    Steph_J

    by Chuck_Chuckwalla

    I'm not bitching about the movie, as I stated, I loved it. I may have stated the obvious when I talked about suspending disbelief. Sure we do it with all fantasy/science fiction flicks. My intent was to just remind Harry that there are rules that you have to buy into, which is a hard thing to do with a film like inception because it's main idea is about dreams — nebulous, ephemeral, unconscious states of mind that don't obey rules. BTW, they're called light sabers, not "laser-swords." See, I bought that premise, I can be flexible. Peace, my brotha.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:32 p.m. CST

    inception should have left me wanting to converse

    by mynamesdan

    but it didn't, because there was never anything at stake.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:32 p.m. CST

    lol at this review.

    by TheDark0Knight

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:34 p.m. CST

    A day late and a dollar short

    by palimpsest

    Enough already.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:34 p.m. CST

    chuck

    by Seph_J

    you are right. My point was that whilst they don't obey rules, they only NEED to obey the rules of the film, which I thought they all pretty much did. Nice to not be insulted by someone in their reply :)

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:37 p.m. CST

    ...great minds, Red Ned...

    by FlickaPoo

    ...or in this case, tired minds.<P> It was all I could do to string those few thoughts together tonight.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:37 p.m. CST

    there was never anything at stake?

    by Thunderbolt Ross

    Hm, yes I suppose the prospect of never seeing your two motherless children again is meaningless

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:38 p.m. CST

    And Harry's Review is spot on...

    by Mr. Profit

    Never had I said this with regard to his reviews. But he is right. "Inception" is a good, well acted, well crafted movie that did not "wow" me at all. It is full of exposition, so I am confused as to why people were so confused by it and needed to see it so many times. Everything is fully explained, and Ellen Paige even asks questions on behalf of the audience. <P>Again, good film, but I don't think I ever need to see it again. Once you have seen it, and see the plan in action at the end, I don't see how I can sit through all the explanation again without FF to the hallway fight. (which was the only good piece of action in the film). <P>The snowmobile chases and that entire sequence in particular was directed in a choppy way. Dom and Mal were supposedly good architects, yet the fantasy world they created looked very uninteresting. Ariadne was supposed to be some great architect, yet all she designed were plain looking landscapes, and a hotel... Those are minor things I am thinking of now and I'm not going to go too into detail. But the movie over all was cold and leaves you waiting to see something you haven't ever seen before, but then it never delivers. <P>And we now live in a time of extremes. There is never a middle ground anymore. People either love something, or hate something. And with this movie the people who love it have overrated it to a degree I have never ever seen. And anyone who disagrees with "Inception" being THE BEST MOVIE IN THE HISTORY OF LIFE! is "Stupid" or "Didn't understand it". What is there to not understand when everything is explicitly spelled out for you when watching the film? <P>The fact that so many complained and complained that Harry didn't review the movie was so odd. For what? Just so you can argue?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:38 p.m. CST

    Everyone who was "underwhelmed" by Inception...

    by grendel824

    ... either had it massively hyped to them to a point beyond where any movie could possibly go, or was someone who I already considered "not very bright." At least half of Harry's criticisms seem to stem from not having a basic understanding of what is going on (like the "dream a little bigger" part - it'd take too long to explain what should be common sense to someone who sees way more movies than I do...).

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:39 p.m. CST

    I'm going full spoiler

    by CherryValance

    First I wanna tackle the James Bond stuff. I thought that was brilliant. Because it's so meant to be recognizable as a James Bond call back. Because clearly in his dreams Fischer (C. Murphy) casts himself as James Bond. Who wouldn't do that if you could? Even I wanted to be James Bond as a kid. But I don't know if, writing a story about people walking around in their own dreams, I would have ever been able to think up something so spot on and universal. I thought it was a stroke of genius. </p> <p>Second I think lots of people expected crazy dream stuff and that's why they're disappointed. But honestly I think I'm an imaginative and sometimes kooky person but my dreams are boring as hell. They usually rehash crap from the day like little jumbled up summaries. On top of that I think the "dreams" are supposed to be realistic so the other people won't know what's happening. If the background characters know they're just figments of the dreamers imagination, they turn on you right? So I think it has to be more realistic than something like the Matrix. Right? I dunno. Maybe I have that wrong.</p> <p>I kinda wished you like it more. Which is an assy thing to say because it's none of my business. You can like and dislike what you want. I just, I dunno, feel bad.</p>

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:39 p.m. CST

    Good movie, but not great....

    by chromedome

    Great premise, concept, but inadequately realized. The Dreams were in large part underwhelming and dull in execution--especially since we had seen amazing things in the Training session with the new architect. And yes, the ski stuff was stunningly ordinary and dull.<p>The one fundamental premise failure was that dreams needed to be "ordinary" in order not to let the target realize he was dreaming... It designed dullness into the dreams. And it was stupid: Utterly ridiculous things happen in dreams, juxtaposed locations, people, events, things and it seems and feels completely real while in the dream.<p>This trap came from the spinning top thing--it was almost like that was one of the first things he wrote--he was so enamored of that spinning top scene, it drove the whole story: you can't tell if you are dreaming any other way, so that means the audience can't be allowed to tell any other way, either. So the dream sequences had to be so realistic rather than surreal.<p>Shame, that.... coulda taken the surreality to a level beyond the Matrix. Started to, in the training sequence, then pulled back--guaranteeing that, except for the hall/fight scene, the sequences would be less impressive & interesting than the architect training scene.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:40 p.m. CST

    INCEPTION = Overrated

    by Dark_Equalizer

    I'm sorry but it is. By no means a bad movie, but I agree with the majority of the 4/5 star reviews. Certainly isnt the best film of the year , but would rate in the top 10 of the year i'd imagine ( based so far ). Every one thinks Nolan is a God due to Darkl Knight, but remember Batman Begins was although solid, quite average

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:40 p.m. CST

    nice review harry

    by Potatino

    I don't mind that it was late. I like your honesty. i think for me it also a movie that was almost right, but not. eh hows that for almost sentence.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:41 p.m. CST

    I am a bad writer

    by redkamel

    What I was trying to say is that the only way to show a movie dreamworld that is the primary setting for a film is to make sure the audience buys it. And the only common dream people have is realistic dreams. Or flying/falling etc. <p>I mostly think its bullshit that all the "Nolan Haters" or "SP fanboys" or whoever knock Inception...which managed to make the most talked about summer movie blockbuster be a relatively original film about dream espionage. Whether you liked it or not, thats true. It DID something. Meanwhile, someone takes a pretty hackeyed story (geek in love proves himself), makes it a literal movie version of a comic book/video game (seen it: Batman in the 60s, Stephen Chow etc etc) and the movie the fails. But the same group says its "breaking new ground". Talk about cognitive dissonance. <p>Nolan may not make movies for everyone, but he sure as hell can do something new that a lot of people end up liking. I personally don't think he is one of the greats, but shit, he could be in a few years...I mean look at his fucking potential. His last movies have all be pretty damn good and original. And all damn hard to pull off on films. Imagine The Prestige, a Batman resucitation and Inception in the hands of anyone else in hollywood (shudder...)

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:41 p.m. CST

    Dammit Dark Knight typo

    by Dark_Equalizer

    I only noticed you as i was pressing submit

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:41 p.m. CST

    Oh and Harry... "I could care less"

    by Mr. Profit

    Is wrong. It's "I couldn't care less". To say you "Could care less" means you already care to some degree and are capable of caring less than that. "I couldn't care less" means you already don't care...

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:42 p.m. CST

    You cannot honestly say

    by kolchak

    that the husband/wife relationship in Shutter Island was more fleshed out than in Inception. <p> Shutter Island provided no evidence that Teddy Daniels and his wife had any good times at all.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:43 p.m. CST

    Waking Life nailed what the dreaming world is like

    by Nerd Rage

    I found that movie alot more rewarding than "Inception" because it actually was playful and inventive with dreams and dream logic instead of a convoluted bank heist movie that chases its tail.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:44 p.m. CST

    redkamel

    by Seph_J

    deserves to be quoted: <p> "Imagine The Prestige, a Batman resucitation and Inception in the hands of anyone else in hollywood" <p> Exactly.. it wouldn't happen. Because nobody else could make a movie like Inception. Which is why it deserves more from Harry than a botched first viewing and having decided he didn't really like it all that much, a rather disinterested second viewing.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:45 p.m. CST

    To Everyones whos pissed.

    by Loveinformant

    It may seem strange that Harry would rate a film like Expendables amazing then watch Inception and have an extremely underwhelming response. But that really is the beauty of movies / music / art. Its not just about the quality or story of the film but also the state of mind and season of life you are in at the time of viewing that forms your experience. Movies have the amazing ability to put stories on to the screen that can draw out narratives that are happening within yourself. When I watched "The Notebook" the frst time i was alone in a theatre after fighting with my wife. It totally ROCKED my world and I was in tears. I watched it a second time in my living room after work and i nearly fell asleep. Ok I admit there are some movies which are horrible but the format in itself is ALIVE. It changes and you notie different things with every view. I loved inception, Im an architect and I had been running a series of creative therapy workshops for kids with trauma at the time that I watched it and it spoke to me in my season. I loved it! But I guess it just didn't do it for Harry in his season. He does have some good points! It could have been crazier. I just dont think people need to defend the film or what they like by putting someone down for their opinon of their experience. I've seem people act like that somewhere else and its with religion. If someone elses opinion of that something provokes you to need to defend it with anger, it shows that other peoples opinions mean alot more to you than the thing you love. It seems like alot of people here are looking for validation of their opinions, and I'd like to validify all of your experiences right now, If you loved it, so did i!! If you didn't like Harry totally cool and I'd love to hear more of why it wasn't great for you and your DREAMS of how it could have spoken to you better.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:46 p.m. CST

    Harry you will NEVER live this down

    by umbral_shadow_

    No one is going to give two shits about anything you write ever again.<P>"These are the dreams of executives, I'l take the dreams of artists". Are you fucking serious? You honestly think Inception is crammed with the imagery of studio suits and Nolan just sat back and said "Yeah, sure whatever". If you believe that Harry, there really is no hope for you.<P>Also the length of your "considered" review speaks volumes. You hated the movie but were unable to elaborate why. This says two things - you are a piss poor reviewer and you didn't understand the film's concepts. Sorry to say this Harry, but Devin Faraci PWNS your ass. If Faraci hated Inception he would have been able to go into detail about what he didn't like about it. You stopped with some ramblings. You are a hack writer Harry. Live with it. Accept it. And don't write another review again if you have any self-respect left. Putz.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:46 p.m. CST

    Loveinformant

    by Seph_J

    is the only adult in the room.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:47 p.m. CST

    For fuck's sake, the conflict at the "snow fort" level...

    by ROBRAM89

    ...was not the whole "storming the castle" conflict, it was the act of trying to coordinate something like that while keeping everything going on three different levels of dreams, AND making sure the inception process took root (although that mostly went without a hitch all on its own), AND THEN getting out by making sure all the "kicks" lined up properly before everybody ended up in limbo. The action parts on that level were just too keep them distracted from the actual problem and ramp up the tension. That's like bitching that the fight scene between Luke and Vader at the end of ROTJ (to use a newly topical example) wasn't dynamic or exciting enough. There is more shit going on there than a motherfucking sword fight.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:47 p.m. CST

    I hear what your saying but...

    by cgih8r

    I like that the dreams had rules and structured boundaries that could be followed. I totally agree that dreams don't occur like that, but it works well for this story. If he made the dream world an "anything goes" type place it would have been a CG infested mess. I much prefer the live in-frame action. It gave the film a beautiful timeless quality that you couldn't get without the dreams being as grounded as they were.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:47 p.m. CST

    chromedome

    by Thunderbolt Ross

    Precisely the wrong thing to find fault with in the movie.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:49 p.m. CST

    Cop out review???

    by TheNewDirector

    Where is it? And yeah Harry nailed it, on another note going to see The Expendables in one hour fuck yeah!!!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:50 p.m. CST

    OK, on the 'anything goes in dreams' front...

    by Seph_J

    Which was better... The Matrix, when there were rules about what Neo could and couldn't do.... fight all you like but RUN from an agent... or The Matrix Revolutions where Neo is superman and theres a million Smiths and they fly together and punch each other a million times??? <p> Which was the more engrossing story?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:50 p.m. CST

    WAKING LIFE Nerd Rage

    by Loveinformant

    BTW YES YES!! Waking life totally caught the feel of dreaming! I loved that film too! it mae me fall in love with the tango!! HAHAH!!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:50 p.m. CST

    7 out of 10 is a good call, Red Ned

    by chromedome

    I tolerated the exposition because I trusted that the elaborate rules, premise he was setting up for us would be truly amazing. <p>The architect training sequence convinced me he was going to deliver on the promise & potential of the premise.<p>But the "necessity" for "realistic dreams" was the flaw that kept this from being GREAT. The idea that somehow the audience must not really be sure at the end, meant that the characters had to experience dull dreams all the way thru. Bad choice.<p>If not for the need to have us wonder about the gimmick ending, the characters could have been in the midst of crazy ass dreams that we got to see as crazy ass, but they didn't notice--they just operate in the dream as if everything is fine, don't notice that elephant in the intersection, or that one second they are in their office, the next they are standing on a beach....<p>The underlying story about Leo and Marion was good, very good.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:51 p.m. CST

    I'm a big fan of Mr. Nolan.

    by Yelsaeb

    I loved Inception immensly. I love all of Mr. Nolan's movies immensly, but don't call me a Nolan fanboy, I just love his movies. But I do agree with Harry that it was too grounded. There's alot crazier and awesomer things that could've happened, but they didn't. You people, including you Harry, need to stop whining about what you didn't get, and enjoy what you did. This movie gave everything that the trailers promised, and I'm satisfied with that.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:51 p.m. CST

    I’m hearing ya, Harry, but it pays to dig deeper

    by Octaveaeon

    <p> Inception <p> What kind of movie is Inception? A mystery? Sci-fi? A heist movie? Or is it more than a movie meant for entertainment. Is it, as Nolan himself has playfully suggested, a movie about movie-making, and thus by extension, a post-modern film, self-consciously referencing itself and its medium? And if this is the case, does it do so only as an ironic wink to the audience, or in order to say something about the status of film as a cultural product? <p> If we begin with sci-fi, then we notice that the most obvious element missing in the movie is any attempt at scientific realism. On the contrary, Inception instead undermines such rigid conventions: by representing dreams in an overtly mathematical and geometric manner, Nolan highlights the fact that this is intuitively contrary to the more chaotic and abstract way most people experience dreams. So, no, it’s not sci-fi. <p> If it’s a ‘heist’ movie, a genre even Nolan has alluded to in interviews (but not exclusively; he also mentioned James Bond movies, and Fellini’s 8½), then it’s interesting that Inception lacks a clear villain or nemesis acting as a notable foil to our heroes’ plans. Cobb’s first target, Saito, not only quickly becomes their next contractor, he even ends up becoming an important member of the team. The next target, Fischer, is less a nemesis than an innocent victim, who would draw more empathy than scorn or fear were it not for the fact that his company is about to dominate the world’s energy market. After that, there’s nothing left to go on. <p> The movie’s moments of peril and risk then rely on anonymous characters that work for either a nameless multinational conglomerate (Cobol Engineering) or are the manifestation of Fischer’s psyche, pre-emptively trained [programmed] to protect it against foreign elements. But Cobol’s role is quickly reduced to nothing once Saito saves Cobb back in Mombasa (and conveniently just in time), which only leaves us with Fischer’s psychological bodyguards, who are too nondescript, and ephemeral, to be menacing. It also does not help that we’re told from the very beginning of the movie that death has no serious repercussions except for waking up the dreamer. <p> Add to this chase and shoot out scenes which seem more reminiscent of earlier James Bond movies, with impossible stunts and crashes that don’t seem to impair our heroes from continuing with their plans (the van rolling over itself a couple of times is the best example). Cobb himself looks like he’s been trained in a bit more than just erecting imaginary buildings and bewildering mazes, though it does help that even in the real world nobody quite knows how to aim; while being chased through the alleys of Mombasa, for example, we see him getting shot at close range, and yet no bullet hits Cobb. The same goes for the dream scenes; Cobb and his team are all excellent marksmen, but the enemy a bunch of lumbering amateurs. <p> One member of the team does get hit though: Saito. But even this serves mostly as a plot device, since his weakened state becomes the catalyst for Cobb’s journey into limbo in the next level (if he dies Cobb loses his chance of being reunited with his children). After this, the movie’s sense of urgency is drawn from the pressures of time. That, and the mystery surrounding Cobb’s dreams and his relationship with Mal. <p> Indeed, the only constant antagonist throughout the movie is Mal, who irregularly appears in Cobb’s dreams. Although we learn early on that she’s a residual projection of Cobb’s own memories, we also quickly realize that she’s a considerable obstacle to any of Cobb’s plans. Even more importantly, she poses a significant existential threat to Cobb, entangling him in a web of guilt and doubt that makes him question what is real. <p> Of course, by then we too are wondering whether the ‘real world’ is really real after all. This is the enigma that thrusts the movie forward, and the resolution to which we all want to see satisfied one way or another. In planting that seed of doubt in Cobb’s mind, who is constantly spinning his spindle in order to prove that he’s not in someone else’s dream, we too are infected with this uncertainty. So subtle is this McGuffin that we may even forget that the use of this or any other totem does not disprove the possibility that Cobb might be in his own dream, something he undoubtedly realizes but that we are never explicitly told. We can only infer this from the explanation given about the use of totems: that they work only when the owner is exclusively acquainted with its physical properties, the rationale being that these properties would otherwise differ in someone else’s dream, much like the polyester carpet that alerted Saito that his mind had been infiltrated. <p> So if the movie is a mystery, how does Nolan navigate us into engaging with characters and a plot that may not be real? Even in the Matrix we are led to identify with Neo, and thus with his journey of awakening, because it is slowly unfolded throughout the entire first movie. Plus, all the action in the Matrix is grounded, and thus made relevant, by another ‘real world’. This is partly the reason why so many were so disillusioned by the sequels, which did everything to undo what the first movie so ingeniously had set up (implicitly stating that the monomyth itself is a potential hegemonic tool that can be used to perpetuate an even more totalitarian system of control). If Inception’s approach to solipsism is reminiscent of The Matrix, it nevertheless approaches things differently by placing the status of reality in doubt from the very beginning, and then re-emphasizing this in the last image, without ever making it clear one way or another. <p> And what about Cobb? He seems far from being your common anti-hero: an imperfect individual, like most of us, that must transcend his own limitations or petty self-centredness for a greater cause. Here, all events are driven by his self-seeking desire to be reunited with his children. An understandable pursuit, though this should not lead us to ignore the fact that he is nevertheless willingly placing other people in [existential] danger along the way. So even if we could stretch our sympathies enough to identify with his plight, and disregard the questionable approach by which he seeks to achieve this goal, the very fact that everything – from particular events to reality itself – is left undetermined, should nullify any likelihood of identifying with the story. In other words, if we enjoy the movie, it cannot be because we engaged with either the story or the characters, because we’re left with nothing to show for our investment. <p> And yet we did. At least, most people did, as is demonstrated by box-office results and critical reception. How is this possible, if both Cobb and the movie are left undetermined? Was it the special effects, or the marketing of this movie as an original concept, that elevated the movie to the status of a cultural phenomenon, much like interest in Avatar was driven more by its technological innovations than by its story-telling? <p> No, these are insufficient explanations. Enough effects-driven Hollywood tent-pole blockbusters have failed to disprove this point, and if anything it was the story and its original, albeit effects-driven, approach to an age-old intellectual problem – the mind/body, reality/illusion dichotomy – that made this movie stand above the more usual summer fare. But even this is not reason enough, since plenty of movies have come and gone tackling the same subject, including the dramatic angle about loss and reconciliation, without resonating with a larger audience. And this still leaves open the moral and epistemological ambiguity of the movie. <p> Maybe Inception as a movie proves Nolan’s premise in The Prestige even more so than that movie did. That movie asserted the conceit that no matter how much we try to figure out what the director-as-magician is ‘hiding underneath his sleeve,’ we still want to be fooled. This is what allows the clever director the space and power to craft an illusion real enough for the audience to accept and surrender to. And from this follows, the better the director, the more he can bend the illusion without losing his audience. But while in The Prestige this is directly related to the experience of a particular movie, in Inception this is transposed to not only movie-making in general, but also ordinary experience, by dealing directly (albeit figuratively) with the power of ideas. <p> Consequently, the fact that he leaves unanswered what the audience is being lead to question (whether Cobb’s real world is a dream or not) is therefore [another] example of Nolan’s sleight of hand leading the audience astray. Yet the exercise is not meant to be self-gratuitous. He constructed this maze in such a way as to make it possible to retroactively retrace the methodical and well-thought out way in which it was built. For beneath all this there seems to be a genuine examination of the way that these [reality/ideas] are grounded, possibly tilting to either faith or reason. <p> Before doing so, it may be useful to first take up the corporate rivalry that prompts the movie’s plot. According to ‘The Cobol Job’, a short graphic novel that was made available shortly before the movie’s premiere, Cobol Engineering had initially hired Cobb to extract information from Kaneda, a senior officer working for Proclus Global, Saito’s company. The motive seems to be an oil-pipeline being built along the eastern coast of Africa, financed by Fischer Morrow, the energy conglomerate Saito wants to split up in the movie. It appears that Cobol is bidding to build this pipeline, and to this end it thought that by extracting information about Proclus, it could then offer it to Fischer in return for a stake in the pipeline contract. Because Kaneda doesn’t have access to Proclus’ confidential information, Cobb’s extraction fails. He is then hired to extract the information from Saito, which is where the movie begins. <p> Already in the beginning of the movie this plan is given an unexpected twist. Not only is Saito aware about the extraction plan, he also used it as a test to recruit Cobb for his own plans to infiltrate Fischer’s mind and persuade him (through inception) into splitting up his father’s company. As he explained to Cobb, Fischer Morrow is on the verge of consolidating its dominance of the global energy market, so such a decision would be to the benefit of Saito’s company Proclus Global (and indirectly, one is lead to assume, the global consumer). <p> But setting aside this high-stakes, yet highly convoluted, corporate espionage scenario, one is still left wondering how Saito knew about Cobol’s plans to extract information from him, or that they would hire Cobb to do so. It appears strangely convenient, considering how Saito quickly moves from being an enemy to part of the team, first peripherally, then by establishing himself as an important member whose initiative (and deep pockets) make the plan possible, to ultimately ending up as a friend partly responsible for Cobb’s quest for redemption. <p> Not only are we led to forget Saito’s questionable motives, not to mention methods (what happened to Nash, for example?) but we also forget about Cobol, which started this whole series of events by hiring Cobb to infiltrate Proclus and Saito in the first place. And why would Cobol seek to punish Cobb and his team for failing to extract information from Saito? One would think that insisting too much in this direction would be counterproductive for Cobol, considering that less of a rival to Proclus, which Fischer Morrow is, they are ultimately dependent on both businesses for this and any other future contracts. It’s not as if now that Saito is aware that they had hired Cobb to extract information they have anything more to lose. The cat’s out of the bag, right? In fact, shouldn’t they be worried that Saito may want to hit them back? Aren’t Saito and his Proclus Global higher up the pecking order of things? You would think so, considering the ease with which Saito has exploited his financial and political resources – resources that seem almost unlimited, unless you compare him to the average Bond villain. <p> None of this makes sense, unless we rely on mental gymnastics in order to make the pieces fit together. Even the Dark Knight seemed more grounded in reality. Or we can consider the possibility that this was all a ruse to get Cobb in contact with Saito; to get him to choose, out of his own initiative, to work for Saito. Isn’t this, after all, similar to the way Cobb and his team set forth to plant Saito’s idea into Fischer’s mind? Both Cobb and Fischer are kidnapped, presented with a new scenario explaining the circumstances in which they find themselves along with a new offer that might help them, indirectly given a choice of participation (though preceded by a convincing argument in favour of cooperation), and then given enough space for their own actions, just enough to sustain the illusion of autonomy so as to accept inception without arousing suspicion. <p> Yet the whole point of the heist plot is to implant an idea into somebody else’s mind. <p> If we extrapolate further, we could even say that both Saito’s and Mal’s roles are clues that the movie is not really about the heist – i.e. the plan to plant an idea in Fischer’s mind – nor is it about Cobb’s own redemption – his reconciliation with his wife’s death (due to inception) and his choice to leave his kids to avoid being imprisoned. Consider first the banality of the assignment commissioned by Saito (to convince his main rival that it is not in his best interests to consolidate his business into a monopoly, even though it is), and then of the plan itself (manipulate his emotions, namely the feelings conditioned by his strained relationship with his father). <p> Both these plans rely on a very simplistic understanding of the human psyche, and seem to be based on outdated psychological theories (auto-suggestion and the behaviorism of Pavlov and Skinner come to mind). But these are allayed by several coincidences that seem like forced plot points meant to keep the story moving (and the audience from noticing Nolan’s sleight-of-hand): 1) Fischer’s relationship with his father – which misses a coherent clarification for his father’s contradictory decision to keep him in the business despite his disappointment – comes across, particularly during the death-bed scenes, like a lazy narrative device used in soap operas; 2) the convenient happenstance that Fischer will travel on the longest non-stop flight, precisely what Cobb and his team need to accomplish their multi-layered inception… 3) and that Saito also happens to have anticipated, which is why he pre-emptively bought the airline (as if buying an airline is something that even the biggest company can easily justify to its shareholders). <p> Of course, if we follow this train of thought, then more questions regarding the plot arise. For example, whatever happened to Nash, Cobb’s first architect? Would it be too much to belabour his absence, or to wonder whether he was killed or tortured? Doesn’t his ostensible rendition to an unknown and shadowy group compromise both Saito’s and Cobb’s morality, and thus the audience’s ability to sympathize with them? <p> Or we can probe even deeper. Why doesn’t Miles (presumably Cobb’s father-in-law) bring Cobb’s children to Paris? Wouldn’t this have nullified Cobb’s most urgent dilemma; his not having seen his children since Mal’s death? There is, if you think about it, nothing that impedes Miles from doing so; he is already acting as an intermediary anyways, bringing Cobb’s gifts to them, and later it is also Miles that is waiting at the airport to take Cobb to see his children. And why is it that Miles teaches in France anyways? <p> There are so many questions that one could ask about everyone in the movie, all of whom seem to be only perfunctorily portrayed. Even his team, some objections notwithstanding, seem to go along quite easily with Cobb’s plans. From Arthur who warns about taking Saito’s assignment, to Miles who has misgivings about allowing Cobb to corrupt “another” of his students, to Ariadne who agrees to join the team, and even continue onboard despite being the only one who really grasps the threat that Cobb’s subconscious poses to the team. Even Eames and Yusuf go along quite easily, but not without the formalities of dissent that precede their membership. All come across as the usual suspects in this type of movie. But maybe that’s the whole point. All except for Cobb. He’s the only whose history we are forced to analyze if we want to understand movie. <p> Typical as these narrative short cuts may be in most action movies, we can’t simply explain them away in favour of narrative expediency, or as plot holes irrelevant to the overall purpose of the story. If this were the case, it would contradict the moral argument of the movie: that ideas matter, and that we are responsible for their dissemination and their impact. Far from presenting a frivolous, if seemingly intricate, series of events, one should therefore assume that every scene and every action in the movie does have a reason. How could one expect any less from a serious film maker that is known for his meticulousness and his attention to detail. (Though he may have been, albeit prematurely, compared to the late Stanley Kubrick because of his working style, Nolan has nevertheless stated his admiration for Kubrick [who hasn’t?] and admitted that his work has been of great influence.) So if something in the movie seems off, or doesn’t ring true, then far from ignoring it as irrelevant we should fix our attention upon it, for it might be intentional, and thus be a clue that helps elucidate more about Nolan’s intentions. <p> So if we return to Saito, we cannot ignore that it was he who insisted in joining the team, or that he is the only member of the team to get hit by a bullet (except Fischer, but he’s not a member) when all the others had been much more exposed to a flurry of bullets, even at close range, without so much as a scratch. And we cannot ignore that it is this injury, along with Fischer’s temporary death (thanks to Mal), that induces Cobb (and Ariadne) to travel into limbo. Otherwise the inception would have succeeded according to plan, though without Cobb’s final reconciliation with Mal’s death. Also, this scenario would not have culminated with Cobb’s final meeting with the elderly Saito with which the movie began. And both Saito and Mal ask Cobb to ‘take a leap of faith.’ So if we admit that the series of circumstances that lead to these events seem coincidental and unwarranted, the obvious question is what is Nolan trying to say? <p> But if we take seriously the possibility that this whole plan itself took place in Cobb’s mind, and that it was therefore the result of Cobb’s own subconscious struggle (desire/fear) to seek meaning and peace, then we must consider the possibility that this the idea of inception itself is a red herring, or maybe just the virus that needs to be eradicated, but that there is another idea being inserted into his mind. Who is behind all this, and why? And can we trace the origin of this other idea? <p> Maybe all of this is taking place in Cobb’s mind, and everyone involved is a manifestation of his attempt. <p> Let’s explore this scenario. <p> What if Mal had been correct, and that the real world that we and Cobb accept as real (and which cannot be proven to be so according to the rules presented by the movie) is not real after all? If this were the case, Mal would supposedly have woken up without Cobb, who would have remained in the illusion in which we find him in. It is also safe to assume that she would do anything to wake him up, including the planning of an inception, which she would presumably be capable of doing since she was just as proficient in her skill as Cobb was (having a lifetime of experience in the dream they had shared) – she was also the one that had taught Cobb about the use of totems – plus she was probably the student (and daughter) that Miles refers to in his conversation with Cobb (the first to be corrupted by Cobb). If Mal were the one manipulating Cobb’s dreams from outside, this would also explain the ease – if not the offhand way – with which Miles yielded to Cobb’s request, which lead him to Ariadne, who as we see in the movie, is the only one who truly probes and confronts him about Mal. Maybe her role is similar to her mythical namesake in that she does indeed help Cobb out of the labyrinth that he had created in his mind. <p> But recall that Cobb argues that dreams always seem to begin ‘half-way,’ and that the beginning somehow fades into the distance, as if it did not even exist. <p> We learn, for example, that he had already achieved inception on his wife’s own mind, with disastrous results, which is the driving motivation for his actions in the movie. But we also learn that it was Miles that taught him everything that he knew (interesting that he is both father-in-law and teacher/mentor). So the obvious question arises: did Miles start this notion of ‘inception’? Or is Mal behind this? <p> But if we follow this line of thinking then the real significant event feeding his sense of guilt, the one he could not bear to confront, but also not ignore – his abandonment of his children – is questionable. One cannot help wonder how it was that Cobb and Mal willingly chose to spend so much [psychological] time in their dream world, separate from their children, in the first place. Is this the behaviour of a normal parent, even one guilty of fantasizing a child-free life in a moment of weakness, burdened by the stress and the responsibility that comes with the role as a parent? No, of course not. One may dream the most wildest and incongruous dreams, it doesn’t mean we would willingly act upon them if given the chance. For all intents and purposes Mal and Cobb did, even if in a shared illusion (compare that family in the opium den). Except here it was only the two of them. This means that even the status of Mal, as both mother and wife, is suspect. Even if she is the one responsible for manipulating Cobb’s mind, we have no way of affirming who she really is, since everything we learn is mediated by Cobb. The same goes for Miles and Ariadne. <p> So barring the possibility that Cobb is simply a bad parent, and his yearning for his children false, the other possibility is that his children really do not exist. It could explain even better Nolan’s choice for the Edith Piaf song used throughout the movie, which talks about regretting nothing. Indeed, he may not need to regret anything, because there is nothing real to regret. <p> They therefore represent, at least potentially, an idea (that of parenthood, as a means to evoke love and longing) that was once planted in his mind. And this would mean that his belief that he had left them could also be the result of another inception. Maybe the idea of parenthood simply arose while he and Mal were spending time in their dreams. It would make sense, for despite the extraordinary experience that living in a tangibly real world that we can manipulate like gods may be, it’s a novelty that in time would probably lose its appeal. Even if we could create new worlds, none of it would be satisfying unless we could also create life. And not just pale imitations of the real thing, derived from our memories, but real autonomous life. <p> These are a lot of maybes, and it’s probably beside the point to continue speculating if the little that we are told about his life is presumably fake. The point is that we, the audience, cannot take any of it seriously, particularly when we consider that everything, including the explanations about the rules and the logic of dreams, is mediated by Cobb. <p> Like I mentioned earlier, the only thing we can and should take seriously are Cobb’s emotions (otherwise we really do have nothing to hold onto in the movie). This would make his children the most significant element in the movie for they, whatever they may represent, are directly related to Cobb’s expressed sense of guilt and regret. Maybe Cobb and Mal willingly created the conceit that they had real children, either to see if it was possible, or because they couldn’t have children in real life. <p> In that case, it is interesting that the status of Cobb and Mal is similar to that of Adam and Eve before the Fall. There too it is woman that tempts man into accepting fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil, which not only leads to the loss of immortality, but also loss of any memory about the Tree of Life; i.e., that they still live in Eden (whether this is called reality, illusion, or limbo doesn’t matter, the point is that it is separate to God, the Architect, or the ‘One’ as source and essence of everything), albeit now populated by their progeny, all of whom are ‘cursed’ with mortality. (The point of the myth is that, both mortality and the original temptation, and thus the role of the Devil as representation of Desire, were according to God’s plan, i.e. a necessary consequence of some unknown anthropological/cosmic principle). But whereas in the biblical genesis (the word was used by Arthur when arguing that ideas cannot be planted externally because they can always be traced to their genesis, i.e. origin, moment of inception) we are told of the role of God as Creator/Architect, in this movie we are left in the dark as to the ultimate source of Cobb’s fantasies (are they the result of auto-inception, or is somebody else, for good or for ill, manipulating his mind, like the neo-platonic Demiurge/Architect), or whether there is some ultimate ‘reality’ grounding all events in the movie. <p> Whatever the case, his leaving his children is the one regret that was the result of a conscious decision, and whose consequences would be echoed by Saito when he asks him: “Dare you take a leap of faith? Or become an old man, filled with regret, waiting to die alone.” So whether real or not, everything that takes place in his mind is meant to goad him onto this path of redemption (and out of the maze).

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:51 p.m. CST

    cont.

    by Octaveaeon

    Let us take up this question from a different perspective. Let us consider the possibility that Cobb is stuck in some kind of memory loop (i.e. a maze), which would both begin and end with his meeting with Saito. In this hypothetical loop, every time he met the old Saito at the dinner table, their conversation would jolt him into remembering their first encounter, part of his attempted extraction with Arthur and Nash that originally took place in the train. From this we may surmise that everything that follows during the movie happens as usual (as far as the loop is concerned), since it all leads to his final encounter with the old Saito. But at the end of the movie this final encounter does not jolt his memory back as it did in the beginning. Why? If we take the possibility of this recursive loop (a limbo of sorts) as our starting point, then a new element must have been introduced into the sequence of events that somehow brings this recursivity to an end. If we want to trace this event, the easiest way may be to move backwards from this final meeting with Saito. By doing so, we notice that the conversation is slightly different from the beginning, and that it also ends abruptly with Cobb waking up in the plane. Somehow, something crucial happens during the movie that leads to a difference in the conversation, which in turn [hypothetically] jolts his memory in such a way that it avoids rebooting itself back to that initial conversation with Saito with which the movie and the plot formally begins. Instead, he wakes up from this recursive loop, though not necessarily into reality. <p> With regards to recursive loops, this is a phenomenon with an extensive and well-known history. One that Nolan may be indirectly alluding to throughout his movie. He may even have borrowed some of his ideas from ‘Gödel, Escher, and Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid’ by Douglas Hofstadter. <p> The book (GEB) uses a problem in set and number theory to explain a more general problem about the relation between language and meaning, in particular the paradox it produces when we try understand one from the perspective of the other, and then tries to contrast this to the nature of human consciousness. The crux of this problem is that a formal axiomatic system of representation (e.g. the real world) cannot account for all the parameters that establish the validity of that system simply because these are potentially infinite and because the propositions (or algorithms) it must rely upon to do so (e.g. the totem) must itself exist outside the originally established parameters (representing the axiom in question, or in this case, reality) it is meant to account for. Translated in the context of the movie, the original axiom (e.g. the ‘real world’) remains incomplete because its status has not been proven one way or another by the totem; as a result we cannot infer the validity of Cobb’s reality, and nor can Cobb. Like Cobb explains, totems only help determine whether one is in somebody else’s dream or not. <p> This may seem like an awkward way of explaining the problem (and is probably better dealt with in the field of hermeneutics, or Hegel’s Logic), but this is also the starting point of the book (associated to Gödels Incompleteness theorem). Aware of the difficulties involved with explaining something so abstract only specialists understand or are interested in, Hofstadter also uses the kōans of Zen Buddhism, the paintings of Escher, and the music of Bach to explain the phenomenon of recursivity and self-reference (strange loops) in formal axiomatic systems, only to contrast these to the process of thought involved in human self-consciousness. As Hofstadter states in another of his books (I Am a Strange Loop): <p> “What I mean by "strange loop" is ... an abstract loop in which, in the series of stages that constitute the cycling-around, there is a shift from one level of abstraction (or structure) to another, which feels like an upwards movement in a hierarchy, and yet somehow the successive "upward" shifts turn out to give rise to a closed cycle. That is, despite one's sense of departing ever further from one's origin, one winds up, to one's shock, exactly where one had started out. In short, a strange loop is a paradoxical level-crossing feedback loop.” <p> So this reference to Hofstadter may not be superfluous. For one, Hans Zimmer admits to having been influenced by GEB in the composition of the soundtrack; e.g. the ominous foghorn sounds used in the trailers and with which the movie begins turns out to be slowed-down version of Edith Piaf’s ‘Non, je ne regrette rien,’ demonstrating a mutual correspondence between the manipulation of time in the music by the composer and the use of the same music to coordinate ‘kicks’ in different temporal speeds by characters in the movie. <p> Another possible reference to this book in the movie are the use of the Penrose stair (twice, by Arthur) to demonstrate how physical properties in a dream can be manipulated to create spatial paradoxes, much like Escher famously depicted in his paintings. And then we have that important scene where Ariadne, learning how to create and distort these physical properties, literally depicts Cobb and herself in the middle of an infinite, recursive, reflexion when she creates and positions two large mirrors across from each other. Something that surprises Cobb, and then worries him when he realizes that Ariadne is recreating from her memories (notice that he realizes this because of his own memories), something that he warns her may lead to difficulties in distinguishing illusion from reality. This is interesting, since this warning comes immediately after her having depicted the illusion of infinite recursivity and then shattering it, when he recognizes the place from his own memories with Mal. <p> If we take seriously the possibility that the movie serves as a metaphorical representation of the problem of recursivity (strange loops), what warrants the movie’s “incompleteness”? The director and the audience. Or better, the shared reality of the director and the audience, and the internal coherence of the axiomatic rules presented in the movie. For, no matter how fantastical or absurd the world being depicted in the movie, we can only derive meaning from the experience of watching a movie if there is a correspondence established between the world of the movie and the real world as experienced by the audience. The establishment of meaning (which like any subjective taste, can vary between individuals) is what impels us to confront and question what the movie represents, whether it is an emotion, a moral dilemma, or a hypothetical scenario. <p> And here we see the strong possibility that Nolan is not only questioning the tropes of film narrative and the medium itself while relying on them at the same time. Or, in other words, that he is questioning the purpose or status of film as a medium without positing an alternative, albeit one meant for the audience to fill in. This may be narrowed down to the question of meaning, and the hegemonic status of film as a tool of symbolic representation in establishing meaning, much like ideas and dreams, and even Cobb himself, are being used to manipulate people in the movie. Cobb’s search for meaning in his life, the movie’s attempt to represent this quest metaphorically, and the correspondence with our (the audience’s) own attempt to derive meaning from life in general, and the movie in particular, are all being compared isomorphically. This too is similar to Hofstadter’s original intention, as he explained in a later preface to GEB: "A crucial part of my book's argument rests on the idea that meaning cannot be kept out of formal systems when sufficiently complex isomorphisms arise. Meaning comes in despite one's best efforts to keep symbols meaningless!" <p> What is the main axiom that the movie posits? [Reality/consciousness] That one of the levels depicted in the movie represents the real world. This needs to be the case, since it is from this level that all other dream levels depend their temporal logic and spatial architecture. In other words, their ability to manipulate space-time depends on their belief that they are starting from the ‘real world’, which serves to ground their incursion into the subconscious. Like I said, this faith is corroborated by a token, which apparently only maintains its original physical properties (which only the original owner knows) in the real world. <p> Of course, these ‘physical properties’ are themselves based on scientific presuppositions, precisely those governing the so-called traditional laws of time and space. These also happen to be the ‘laws’ or logic that the audience tacitly concedes to when it accepts these tokens as a plot device, even though these ‘laws’ are no more axiomatic than the so-called rules governing the subconscious, or the correspondence between reality and the dreams. In other words, any knowledge of the precise correspondence of each subconscious level with the original level (the real world) is based entirely on a presupposition, i.e. faith. Notice that it is not even important whether this original level is the real world or not; the point is to use it as a reference with which to coordinate their actions in the subsequent levels. <p> If we remain on the subject of strange loops, there is therefore yet another plausible scenario worth exploring: Cobb is himself an algorithm – i.e. a computer program – derived from COBOL. COBOL could refer to one of the oldest programming languages. According to Wikipedia, its “name is an acronym for COmmon Business-Oriented Language, defining its primary domain in business, finance, and administrative systems for companies and governments.” This would make sense, if we look at how the notion of mathematical precision regulating the dream world is a tautological falsity, especially if it’s a dream-based presupposition to begin with. In other words, the ‘mathematical’ argument may be a subconscious idealization meant to grant the conscious self (e.g. Cobb) the semblance of control and security in a world otherwise devoid of meaning. The argument is therefore akin to Cobb’s reliance on the spinning top (the notion of harmony or some natural law grounding the structure of reality, even human subconscious). It is the alternative to the ‘leap of faith’ argument. <p> Within this context, perhaps the fact that Cobb begins by working for Cobol and ends up in the service of Proclus which is owned by Saito, who is in turn opposed to both COBOL and Fischer, is meant to denote this shift in his awareness of the nature of reality and his relation to it, even if intuitively. <p> PROCLUS, may also represent a program meant to prompt A.I. in Cobb, or an external force (deus ex machina) representing the genesis of the original inception that leads Cobb out of limbo/false reality (much like what happens to Neo throughout the Matrix trilogy). Here too the name may be a clue. <p> Proclus was a philosopher (and mathematician) who lived in a time of great change, when competing ideas that on the surface seemed antithetical to each other – ancient pagan philosophical traditions and Christianity – were increasingly at odds with each other. From our perspective, his work looks both backwards and forwards. In its neo-pythagorean and neo-platonic influence, it venerates ancient traditions whose influence was in decline, and would soon be considered antagonistic. And yet it helped transmit what would remain an essentially neo-platonic core in the heart of Christianity, a system of thought whose power and influence would come to dominate most of Europe (and beyond). <p> What is relevant to us is that Proclus’ system is the complete antithesis of what a formal algorithmic system like COBOL represents. And this because, despite their awareness of the mathematical nature of the universe, [neo-]pythagoreans saw in natural patterns, harmonies, and geometric symmetries an expression of an even more fundamental principle; one which in the wake of Plato would be narrowed down to a monistic essence, e.g. the One [gk. to Hen], or God, governing all of existence. Reality. <p> It is also a tradition that would infuse in the western mind the drive to understand and explain the paradox of existence; one which wedded to Christian pragmatism, would steer this drive towards experimentation and the desire to control nature and one’s own fate. Western liberalism, humanism, capitalism, universal rights and education, all these are offshoots of that fundamental struggle between a nascent individualist conscience and the mystery of an intelligent kosmos. A struggle that was and is essentially human, and thus universal, though it was ironically allowed to flourish in Europe thanks to the Christian promise of the Kingdom of God and a universal brotherhood of mankind – a doctrine that was gradually forced to defer, though not without a fight, to the autonomy of reason and individual agency. <p> But regardless of what Proclus/Saito may represent, the point is not to posit the ‘reality’ of Proclus/Saito within the context of the movie, but to approach Proclus/Saito as the symbol of our need to look elsewhere/outside for the source of any meaning (much like the monolith in 2001). Otherwise we fall into the same mistake of substituting the shadowy COBOL with the ‘benevolent’ Proclus Global, which leaves us empty-handed with regards to the movie and its use of strange loops. Besides, part of the argument is that the movie is using a sleight of hand in order to set us on the wrong foot, making us use the wrong axiomatic system to categorize and understand the movie’s depiction of reality. This is also the reason why asking whether the movie’s ambiguous ending is meant to suggest the possibility that Cobb was and is still dreaming – that he’s not in fact in reality – itself already relies on a false premise: that the movie is structured upon the premise that life is based on the well-known illusion/reality duality (mind-body). The point is that Cobb finally returns to his children. If we want to understand the ending, then we need to interpret what this event signifies to us. <p> If we instead consider the dichotomy of truth/being, we can more readily accept that whether or not the ending still takes place in a dream is irrelevant; the question is shifted to the truth of the event, and of Cobb’s emotional experience, not to whether these take place in ‘reality’ or not (remember, ‘reality’ is an incomplete axiom which cannot be proven within the parameters of the movie). The important question is then whether Cobb has overcome his fears and reconciled with the truth of his actions (more importantly, if he has found meaning). The mere act of looking at his children symbolizes his willingness to confront this truth (that he’d forsaken his children out of fear and guilt) – something he was unwilling to do before. His children turning around and approaching him in turn symbolizes his reconciliation with this truth. Whether or not the spindle keeps spinning or not is irrelevant, now that Cobb has transcended his fixation with the question of what is real (which is what destroyed Mal, and was about to destroy him too). Having the movie end in this way is not so much a tongue-in-cheek gesture by Nolan, but a challenge to the audience, not only to look beyond the surface structure of the film, but to do so with experience in general, beginning with our the way we usually approach movies (and art). The question is therefore not whether his children are real or not (if they are, he was a bad parent to begin with), or whether he’s still stuck in limbo or not, but what is the [ontological] status of limbo. I.e., is it meant to be a dream, an existential limbo, a spiritual purgatory, a strange loop, or all of the above? <p> In a way, Inception fits in that growing list of films that seem to appeal to audience members to question not only the movie’s artistic depiction of the ‘problem of reality’, but their own subjective experience of reality as well. If it were only about the artistic process itself, then Synecdoche New York should be seen as its superior; it is a movie that not only better depicts visually the world-creating aspect of story-telling, but triumphs in demonstrating the extreme emotional tension that can arise between the artist and that which he or she creates, including its effect on other personal relations. By contrast, Inception is less interested in pointing to itself or movie-making in general than it is about using the movie as a medium to compare our every-day experience and the dangers that lurk underneath when either are taken for granted. In effect, it is a warning against simply viewing movies as passive entertainment. One could therefore argue that it builds upon themes introduced in the Prestige and his Batman movies; the craft of movie-making as magic, and the [political] power of images. <p> If anything, Inception seems less successful as a movie and more so as an interesting thought experiment on the nature of reality. Accordingly, the depiction of dream states serve less to elucidate the true nature of dreams than to describe our perception of reality, particularly of space and time. The movie’s thesis, then, could be that ‘reality’ is determined by the interrelation between autonomous choice and the function of memory. In other words, that our experience of linear temporality is nothing except an infinite sequence or recursive loops capable of spawning infinite different scenarios, and that each such scenario is itself an infinite recursive loop. The only thing guiding such a system ‘forward’ is the instigation of desire (e.g. for meaning) with produces change within the system, which is then catalogued by memory as the perception of change. (Different myths and individual thinkers have proposed various elementary desires as responsible for the ‘genesis’ of consciousness, such as fear, lust, hunger, to glory or the desire for knowledge.) <p> The same could be said about the relation of the movie to the audience. The point of inception is to plant the seed that Kant thought would enlighten mankind onto the path of enlightenment: sapere aude (dare to know). But in planting the seed, it also seems to point to itself, perhaps as a motivation to take the movie seriously, that it is not just simple entertainment. It may want to suggest that it doesn’t need to plant any seed, because that seed is already in all of us; it is inherent in all our actions, all our desires, and all our dreams. In other words, the movie may want to revivify an even older instruction: gnōthi seauton (know thyself). <p> Following this theme of moral autonomy and responsibility, it is interesting that Nolan’s work does seem to focus somewhat on the ramifications of making the wrong choices in crucial moments. In Memento we find out that the main character had made up his whole history, and shot an innocent person, just so he could forget a painful memory (that he’d accidentally killed his own wife). In Insomnia, we find a similarly morally compromised individual choose to hide an error – the death of his partner – despite the consequences this would have on innocent people (he even begins to question whether he did in on purpose or not; he may have subconsciously wanted him dead, and acted upon that urge without thinking). Even the Batman movies are saddled with the moral implications of certain decisions, though The Dark Knight succeeds the most in contrasting the moral equivalence of two opposing extremes (order and chaos), and the willingness to confront their implications that ultimately distinguishes Batman from the Joker (though in Nolan doesn’t hide that Batman nevertheless choose the end as a justification of the means when he uses technology that overrides the right to privacy of the citizens of Gotham). <p> Inception is also subtle in its criticism of the potential consequences of corporate hegemony: it begins using the struggle for global dominance as a backdrop for what will follow, and to explain Cobb’s involvement. This struggle, though, is not between competing political and ideological systems of thought, but of global conglomerates seeking control of the energy markets. The difference could be attributed to the fact that nowadays, with the fall of communism in the West and the adoption of capitalism by China, there is no longer a viable alternative to capitalism, even though it is still uncertain whether the Chinese model – which still leaves little space for the private and individual liberties that we have grown accustomed to in the West (and that we use to justify our rhetoric of universal human rights; i.e. our moral superiority, despite our ongoing military and economic subjugation of third world countries whose sovereignty we can undermine through moral arguments, despite their obvious falsity) – will evolve into a different capitalist model capable of challenging the western liberal capitalist model. <p> Considering that this struggle between China (or the so-called BRIC countries) and the West partly depends on access to energy resources, it may not be a coincidence that Cobb’s mission is set upon this backdrop, which will play out in Africa (just as it is now being fought in the Middle-East and Southern Caucasus). The indifference with which Cobb runs through the streets of [Morocco?] may seem like the usual chase scene set in an exotic location, but it may actually represent the disdain and lack of respect with which we intrude into other nations for own self-interests, gamble with their money and their lives, and then leave without a word, leaving behind a trail of destruction. And even when they tell us straight to our face that they don’t want us there, we’d rather pretend we don’t hear them, like the scene with the owner of the café that shouts at Cobb for his intrusion, reprising what would usually be a moment of relief in an Indiana Jones movie, but is now set in a post-colonialist backdrop of warring conglomerates seeking control of a dwindling energy resource. So yes, we will stay, even if it means having to bear with the narrow-minded intolerance of the locals; people that may look different, but want the same things we do. Indeed, like the old man in the opium den full of dreamers tells Cobb, “They come here to be woken up. Their dream has become their reality. Who are you to say otherwise?” <p> But like I said, these critical hints are subtle, and serve only as a background to a much larger struggle, whose depiction is more ambitious. The structure of the movie may even be meant as a heuristic device for exploring the nature of consciousness and memories. But whether it is related to the problem of technology, of dehumanization, or the limitations of thought, my point is that any description of this problem remains part of the problem unless it includes in it the medium, and in inner logic, by which it presents this description. It is altogether precarious if it knowingly hides this process, and how it works. COBOL may be playing HAL (Heuristic ALgorithm) to our Bowman (Cobb). Either way, the message remains the same. <p> This may all seem academic, but there really is something at stake. The question about the status of art as a medium of meaning is only one part of the equation. The other is the possibility of art as a medium of autonomous thought, where thought can represent its own symbols separate, even in contradiction, to the overall parameters of the dominant system. With regards to Inception, the question is whether Nolan seeks to challenge the hegemonic system upon which he must rely as an artist while simultaneoulsy creating a space or rupture upon which new representations can be established and made to flourish. <p> So here’s the executive summary: <p> Limbo is the infinite recurrence of a sequence of events in-between the scenes with young and old Saito. In other words, Saito is not in ‘limbo’, but is, like Mal et al., a subconscious projection of Cobb trying to alert himself that he’s stuck in a loop (i.e., limbo). Hence Cobb’s need to save Saito from ‘limbo’; his promise to arrange his entry into the U.S. to be reunited with his children represents the final obstacle necessary to get out of this labyrinth he somehow got stuck in. However, this does not mean he returns to ‘reality.’ Redemption, in Cobb’s case, is simply the return to a previous dream state, in this case one where he returns to what he believes are his memories of his children, but also one in which he is reconciled with the death of his wife, and his role therein. His letting go of his wife’s totem, the spindle/top, represents this reconciliation; a penance of sorts, for the damage he has caused by playing with powers and ideas beyond his understanding. But a step up from limbo nonetheless. <p> What lies further up the ladder? That is left unsaid. <p> Inception <p> “Any life is made up of a single moment, the moment in which a man finds out, once and for all, who he is.” <p> “Through the years, a man peoples a space with images of provinces, kingdoms, mountains, bays, ships, islands, fishes, rooms, tools, stars, horses and people. Shortly before his death, he discovers that the patient labyrinth of lines traces the image of his own face.” <p> Jorge Luis Borges

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:52 p.m. CST

    WAKING LIFE!! Yes!!

    by chromedome

    Good example.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:53 p.m. CST

    While I understand where you are coming from ...

    by JamieCOTC95

    ... I couldn't disagree more. I loved the film. I was stunned and emotional drained after that movie. It hit me like a sledge hammer. I swear on the grave of Orson Wells that nothing has hit me like this since 1977.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:53 p.m. CST

    Octaveaeon

    by Seph_J

    didn't sleep in Inception.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:54 p.m. CST

    I LIKED Inception, but wanted to LOVE it.

    by chromedome

    I will buy the dvd, will watch it again.<p>But I will fast forward thru 90% of the snow sequence.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:55 p.m. CST

    Spend a few years

    by jameskpolk

    away from your children. Then see Inception again. Then see if you think there is not emotional depth to the story.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:55 p.m. CST

    Scott Pilgrim has the opposite problem...

    by The Dum Guy

    It is too surreal to take seriously, while Inception's dreamscape is too real to (not) take seriously.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:55 p.m. CST

    I'm 12 years old and what is this

    by Cosmo Nautilus

    Thank you, Harry. Inception doesn't deserve half the accolades it's been receiving. It's like a Dan Brown book.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:55 p.m. CST

    Octaveaeon jezus.

    by RPLocke

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:56 p.m. CST

    Shut the fuck up Scott Pilgrim Fan

    by Dharma4

    You ain't the king or master of anything. Yes, I liked Scott Pilgrim but you seriously just need to fucking blow a load, get a coke, smile and shut the fuck up. Christ.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:56 p.m. CST

    Octaveaeon...

    by BP_drills_america_a_new_asshole

    Exacatly what I was going to say!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:58 p.m. CST

    The reason some of us are pissed. . .

    by jimmay

    Harry ignored, flat out ignored, one of the biggest releases of the Summer, one opened to wide critical acclaim and great film community enthusiasm. He kept on responding to people asking his opinion of it in talkbacks that he was working on it, he'd get to it. <p>Four long weeks passed (for most movies that's their entire lifetime in the theater) before he deigned it worthy of slapping together a mediocre review of it. During that time, he slobbered hyperbolocally all over Expendables, which he reviewed before it hit theaters, and which he had an obvious personal investment in-- being close friends with the Director and openly attacking an early negative review of. In said review, he also made a note that, though he hadn't seen it yet, he knew Scott Pilgrim Vs the World was the best movie of the Summer. <p>I'll say it again, at this point he had ignored the thusfar highest anticipated movie of the Summer, refusing to acknowledge it with a review, rushed out an over the top, gushing review for his personal friend's movie, and declared a movie he hadn't even seen the best film of the season. If you can't see why that annoys some of us, I'll have to choreograph a puppet show for you to explain it in terms you might better understand.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:58 p.m. CST

    WTF does Scott Pilgrim have to do with Inception?

    by jimmy_009

    Really?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:59 p.m. CST

    Even Armond White

    by kolchak

    thinks Harry's review is inconsistent and full of shit.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:59 p.m. CST

    That's it im out

    by ndally

    I've heard Harry say Saving Private Ryan, Minority Report and Inception aren't all that but the expendable, twlight or any of the shit movies you compared inception too(including a fucking Freddy Cougar movie). Inception is no revelation but what is wrong with you thar you get so much wrong about the plot? As numerous people have stated they can't dream bigger or they will be attacked you tool and ruin the whole point of the heist. The guy can't get wise to the fact that he's being conned. Fuck your just writing a review like this get to this kind of response out of people otherwise you wouldn't have bothered with that halfassed review.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:59 p.m. CST

    jimmay

    by Seph_J

    especially when Inception is about as original as cinema gets, and The Expendables.... isn't.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 8:59 p.m. CST

    Fuck you Harry

    by RedBull_Werewolf

    Can't hold your pee, falling alseep throughout a movie? you are such a spoiled brat

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:01 p.m. CST

    Too subtle for Harry.

    by V'Shael

    The movie was empirically awesome. Fact.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:02 p.m. CST

    OK... question:

    by Seph_J

    How many of us would go to the cinema with someone we thought was going to run off for a piss as the best bit, or sleep for a large portion of the new Christopher Nolan film??? <p> So the next question would then be.... <p> wtf are we doing on this website?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:02 p.m. CST

    Harry like Nightmare On Elmstreet 3

    by BP_drills_america_a_new_asshole

    Let's just think about that for a moment. He rates NOE3 higher than Inception. Let's just think about that for a moment. Now I ask the question - why do we give this fucking insane human haggis the time of day?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:03 p.m. CST

    I AM THE WIZARD MASTER!!

    by Seph_J

    But shhhh, don't tell anyone otherwise the subconscious will think somethings up....

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:04 p.m. CST

    I liked it a lot

    by MJDeViant

    Harry's opinion seems to be that he would rather of had someone else do it more loosely and less grounded (like Gilliam or something) instead. I'm fine with thinking that but that means nothing to the movie that actually exists. I also hate talking back on the review sections on here honestly. Everyone just puts their opinion here as fact and claims everyone doesn't get it or anything. Just let it go and enjoy it yourself. Reviews on this site are usually pointless fanboy banter anyways (actually all reviews are useless, just see it yourself). If you liked it then nobody is gonna take that away from you. BUT you dont need to make everyone else like it. Harry, I disagree with your review and I like the fact he kept it grounded instead of being some Speed Racer/Gilliam amount of zaniness going on everywhere. Its more Nolan's style and I'm happy he has a style. To each their own.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:04 p.m. CST

    jimmy_009

    by The Dum Guy

    Scott Pilgrim is far more of a 'dream' movie than Inception. It literally hitches the whole plot on a dream/vision.<br><br>And, it it being reviewed by Harry in the same 24 hours that he reviewed Inception (which has been out a whole month).

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:05 p.m. CST

    "ignored the thusfar highest anticipated movie of the Summer"

    by Mr. Profit

    How do you know it was the highest anticipated film of the Summer? How can you be so sure when you say that. <P>Maybe it was the highest anticipated film of the Summer for you. But everyone's tastes in their entertainment options is different. Judging by popularity alone, Toy Story 3 grossed the most of all movies released this Summer. So one could say that was the highest anticipated movie of the Summer. <P>But then again, the same could have been said about "Eclipse" since it's box office gross is currently sitting higher than "Inception". <P>My point is, don't speak for everyone when arguing your point.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:05 p.m. CST

    ^it is^

    by The Dum Guy

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:06 p.m. CST

    he speaks for me

    by Seph_J

    it was my most anticipated movie of the summer.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:07 p.m. CST

    Sweatin to the oldies just never fully took with Harry

    by ChocolateJesusMan

    Why are we all clamoring for a review from Harry seeing as he has become a fat douche with the writing skills of a retarded chimpanzee who sold out his journalistic integrity years ago

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:09 p.m. CST

    Harry why haven't you replied yet?

    by BP_drills_america_a_new_asshole

    Too busy playing with your Barbie dolls? C'mon defend yourself you fucking cunt. What you've done is the equilvelent of drawing a moustache on the Mona Lisa and then hide under the stairs. Come out of hiding and defend yourself you anal polyp.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:09 p.m. CST

    Inception is not original.

    by Cosmo Nautilus

    The plot, honest to god, was stolen from a Duck Tales comic. Look it up.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:09 p.m. CST

    I can say Inception was the most anticipated

    by jimmay

    film of the Summer the same way I can say that Avatar was the most anticipated film of last winter. Because it obviously was. The hype level was huge, particularly around here. I can't quantify it, can you?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:10 p.m. CST

    Harry, this is the final nail in your coffin

    by MattmanReturns

    That's it, man. Everyone's entitled to their opinion, of course, but you are just one over the top review after another, praising the shit out of mediocre films (Kick Ass), and now you can't get into the most nuanced, detailed film of the year. I'm done with you.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:11 p.m. CST

    HARRYYYYY? Where ARRRE YOUUUU?

    by Seph_J

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:12 p.m. CST

    Well he speaks for you then. Not everyone...

    by Mr. Profit

    Heavy anticipation means a ridiculously huge opening due to the anticipation being so great. <P>That's why The Dark Knight SLAYED opening weekend. The high anticipation was there. If referring to that film, you could argue that it was the most highly anticipated film of that Summer since it made major waves in box office gross in it's opening weekend, broke records, and continued its run to the #3 highest grossing (Non Adjusted for Inflation) movie of all time in the US. <P>Inception's opening weekend? 63 million... Bad? No. But that figure doesn't show high anticipation. <P>The film has had great staying power though. But again, don't speak for everyone.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:13 p.m. CST

    People read into the movie too much

    by Thunderbolt Ross

    I don't know why Inception has this reputation as a "mind-bender" or some deep-thinking concept, or ... whatever. Keep in mind I loved it but I think all this in-depth criticism, while interesting in and of itself, exists quite discretely from the film, which is basically a better mousetrap, 3-D chess, what have you. <p>Nolan himself called it a heist movie, and I agree with that description. All the quasi-existential "questions" people bring up are well beside the point. Most of the ambiguity of the film is in service to the emotional state of DiCaprio's character as it relates to his wife. It's not some treatise on the meaning of life or something.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:15 p.m. CST

    Most overrated sci fi since

    by Powerring

    The matrix. It just wasn't that big of a deal.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:15 p.m. CST

    I agree with Harry's review for the most part

    by sunwukong86

    Nothing in Inception felt like someone's dream. it felt like The Matrix where you can alter a similar reality. Dreams never make sense..well at least mine. Dr.Parnassus seems more along the lines of what I was thinking but you know not so in your face.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:17 p.m. CST

    Harry why don't you just die?

    by BP_drills_america_a_new_asshole

    Your readership demands it. Give the people what they want.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:18 p.m. CST

    RE: Inception being over rated

    by Citizin_insane

    For every over rated comment, I could show you one that under rates it. The fact that it divides audiences shows that between the "mehs" and the "WOWs" the general consensus is it's a great movie. No need to debate it

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:18 p.m. CST

    Thunderbolt Ross

    by Seph_J

    You're right, it's not a treatise on the meaning of life... as Chuck_Chuckwallla and I were saying earlier, the film creates it's own world, it's own characters and it's own rules... and it STICKS TO THEM. Unlike most summer movies which make shit up as they go along, not caring what they established at the start. And that is to be commended.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:19 p.m. CST

    "vastly superior Shutter Island"

    by I am_NOTREAL

    I stopped there. There was no point in reading any further.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:20 p.m. CST

    I have a pointer or two Harry regarding your review

    by laguna_loire

    You mention the fact that you're disappointed with the face that after Ellen Page's twisting of the world, that in the actual "Heist" the world isn't contorted that much at all. But didn't it make sense that with Ellen Page's character being the "architect" if you will, that she would try to keep the world "grounded" (I use that term in quotes, given the "Call of Duty" snow sequence!!) so that no-one else in the team flipped-out? And the wants and desires you have are there in another movie - the Matrix.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:21 p.m. CST

    laguna_loire

    by Seph_J

    the wants and desires Harry wants are in The Matrix Revolutions.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:22 p.m. CST

    Harry didn't like it because....

    by alienindisguise

    there wasn't enough homoeroticism in it.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:22 p.m. CST

    So FUCK YOU and every other idiot that nods off during films

    by Anything But Tangerines

    then comlplains about how they "didn't get it" ITS BECAUSE YOU WERE ASLEEP IDIOT

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:23 p.m. CST

    Yeah, but is it as good as...

    by film11

    TRIANGLE? Now THAT was a real mind-bender even without elaborate special effects!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:24 p.m. CST

    GOD DAMN NARCOLEPTIC FILMGOERS

    by Anything But Tangerines

    they are much worse than overactive ones

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:26 p.m. CST

    Actually, I have something else to say.......

    by laguna_loire

    Sorry Harry, I know that you've been busy and such, and I know that the talkbackers can be a cruel kind, but why did you post your review for Inception? The review itself feels like you felt obligated to write something, but rather than give the movie a chance you didn't feel like you wanted to - and instead you're concentrating on the Expendables and Scott Pilgrim. I've seen you do this before, when you slaughtered Oceans 11 (stating that you thought the utter crapfest that is 3000 Miles to Vegas was better. And all because you were still pumped-up on Fellowship of the Rings!!). Harry, I'm not slating you for your enthusiasm, but rather I think at times that its misplaced, and like a badly-mixed cocktail, the heat isn't throughout the drink.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:26 p.m. CST

    I'm going to bed now. If Harry turns up

    by Seph_J

    tell him he should be ashamed of doing Nolan and Inception the disservice of falling asleep, and than no amount of "i'll review it later-shit-ya-pants" is gonna make up for it. <p> Review films properly Harry, or don't review films at all.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:27 p.m. CST

    RE: Harry's Review

    by Citizin_insane

    Harry's feelings towards INCEPTION epitomizes what wrong with geek culture. Time after time Harry's taste in film show us that HE CAN ONLY TRULEY VALUE ART BY HOW WELL IT HELPS HIM ESCAPE REALITY. The danger of escapism is the point of Inception. And Harry (along with all you pasty vitamin D defecient nerds) are the evidence

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:27 p.m. CST

    Seph J

    by laguna_loire

    I was thinking the exact same thing - but I also remembered certain moments in Reloaded.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:27 p.m. CST

    Yet you wax love on shit

    by monkeybrow

    such as the Expendables. whatever Harry...

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:28 p.m. CST

    Now that scott pilgrim and the expendables are throughly blown

    by canvasseamonkey

    here's his inception review, 1 month later. something is odd here

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:30 p.m. CST

    I totally agree....

    by ClayG

    I was looking forward to the film, but the problem started for me when I saw the trailer, and wasn't moved *at all*. Does nobody realize this film wouldn't even exist without The Matrix? And those movies engaged both the mind and the *heart*. I love to think in the theater, and I acknowledge those who still care enough to engage my mind. But unless you can touch my heart as well, you ultimately fail, And that's the failure of Inception. It's a pretty puzzle, an attractive architecture, but it doesn't move the soul or touch the heart. The Matrix did...and Scott Pilgrim does, too. Nolan only seems to muster any emotion when he's making movies about Batman. He has a lot left to learn.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:30 p.m. CST

    ...but The Expendables is a "masterpiece" LOL

    by MyScroteHasGout

    Hilarious!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:31 p.m. CST

    For chissakes, Octaveaeon!

    by I am_NOTREAL

    You're really expecting us to read that shit??? Give me a break!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:31 p.m. CST

    ClayG

    by Seph_J

    DiCaprio gets to see the faces of his children again. You cold hearted monster.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:31 p.m. CST

    Which will be considered a classic in ten years?

    by MattmanReturns

    Inception, or Expendables?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:33 p.m. CST

    I loved it

    by Miyamoto_Musashi

    Movie of the year for, seen it a couple of times, seeing it again today. If I had any movie making talent, and money behind me this os the kind of movie I would want to make<br />Toy Story 3 comes in at second<br />Would agree with Harry on one point you shouldn't watch this movie when you are tired, should be watching something short and brainless if you are tired

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:34 p.m. CST

    Here than Harry....

    by Seph_J

    Short and brainless.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:34 p.m. CST

    Here than Harry....

    by Seph_J

    Short and brainless.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:34 p.m. CST

    *Hear that Harry

    by Seph_J

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:39 p.m. CST

    Let's review Harry's Summer:

    by jimmay

    Inception-crap<p>Toy Story 3-crap<p>Expendables-masterpiece (and not just because I'm best friends with the Director) <p>Scott Pilgrim-best film of the year (I knew before I even saw it that it was the best; watching it was just a formality!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:40 p.m. CST

    maybe it didn't feel like a dream

    by Potatino

    because it wasn't a dream? Just a theory

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:41 p.m. CST

    Harry, you in a way missed the point

    by AxeEmAll

    The reason why the dream had to be grounded in reality is that it is based on the premise that infiltrators won't have difficulty entering intothe dreamer's subconscious. There is a need for familiarity for the dream thieves within the subconscious if they are to execute their plans well. Just imagine if the dreamer dreams about other worlds or worse, outer space. That is why there is a need for an "architect" to put the dreamer in a state which makes him more vulnerable to manipulation.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:41 p.m. CST

    100% proof that nolan somehow dissed harry....

    by vincebell

    now, i am not talking about the fact that harry doesnt like the film - in fact, that actually makes me still believe in harry's credibility as a journalist. i like that harry doesn't necessarily fall in line with every other review on the planet. what im getting at is the way that all of a sudden harry is specifically attacking a guy he use to ADORE. harry - man up & spill it: what did nolan - or someone from his camp - do that turned your opinion against this guy? and please dont say its his filmmaking you dont vibe, because the last film of his you reviewed, you were praising his work (in admitted hyperbole!!) for those of you who dont believe me, please re-read harry's review of TDK. again, i could care less that harry doesn't like inception, i just wish he'd be honest about why he's all of a sudden calling nolan a corporate tool - yes we can read between the lines. if they did something that is truly shitty, then im on your side harry, and id even defend/side-up with you. but the words you are choosing, and the demeanor you are expressing is just really fishy & too many red flags are going off. i guess i just love your enthusiasm for cinema too much to believe that all of a sudden you think chris nolan lacks imagination.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:42 p.m. CST

    i liked the grounded dreamworld

    by Bouncy X

    i admit i was expecting more fantastical dreamworlds but i liked how grounded in reality it mostly was. can't speak for anyone else but 99% of the dreams i remember tend to be based in reality. its very rare i have these off the wall "hollywood" like dreams. i mean sometimes the subject matter might be odd or whatnot but its still happening in the "real world".

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:43 p.m. CST

    Sounds to me

    by Arthur_Digby_Sellers

    Like this "reviewer" allows for his environment to influence his opinion on films he reviews. I bet if he saw Inception during a comic con setting like Scott Pilgram he would have given it an "omg I just geek jizzed in my pants y'all" review.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:44 p.m. CST

    Harrys Reviews

    by Miyamoto_Musashi

    No one is seriously reading Harry's reviews are they ? Lets be honest Merrick's son is a more committed and much better film critic than Harry. Definitely much better written.<br />I read them for the entertainment factor and the talkback that follows. They tend to come across like the stereotype of a 12/13 year old boy watching the movie, i.e. short attention span, wants everything spoon fed, lazy, not objective when "friends" are involved.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:45 p.m. CST

    We will all cherish showing our children

    by kolchak

    "The Expendables" and "Scott Pilgrim" for the first time while "Inception" rots in the dollar bin at Wal Mart. <p> Surely.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:45 p.m. CST

    What's the point dude

    by mistergreen

    It's been like a month since the movie opened. We don't need to hear you take on it.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:46 p.m. CST

    Just don't care about this film...

    by ryderdvs

    Nolan is overrated. DiCaprio displays more ham than the Deli at my local grocery store. And when did Michael Cera get the idea that he was a movie star?? I don't care how bad THE EXPENDABLES may be, at least it's full of leading men that actually look like grown men, and not 16-year-old-facebook-twittering-Starbuck's-drinking-dipshits.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:47 p.m. CST

    jimmay

    by Miyamoto_Musashi

    If you keep that kind of tally of Harry Reviews for the year will be some very funny reading

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:49 p.m. CST

    Nice half-hearted "Stop picking on me" review.

    by The Dark Shite

    Harry, Inception is a fucking great movie. <p> You don't have to agree, but at least give a detailed analysis to back up your opinion. You know, maybe go into the notions & concepts a little? Perhaps even delve into specific scenes & say why they don't work for you, like an actual reviewer might?<p> The fact that it took you so long to write this (& only did do under duress) is pretty fucking shameful already.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:53 p.m. CST

    Harry, God love ya. You're just not too bright.

    by DoctorZoidberg

    You praise the remake of Nightmare on Elm Street, but find fault with this? Yikes man, yikes.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:53 p.m. CST

    Nolan is overated ?

    by Miyamoto_Musashi

    I love this site for those absolutely rediculous comments, its hilarious. Sometimes this site is like Bizarro world, i.e. c<br />ritically acclaimed + popular = overrated

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:54 p.m. CST

    Harry just has to hate

    by RedBull_Werewolf

    I new he wasn't going to like this film, now, if it was an indie film that ascreened at some loser fesival he would be all over it. Harry is a sellout

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:55 p.m. CST

    to harry

    by electronegativity

    so, you didn't thing the vast cityscapes were awesome. Honestly, the final frame of that film changed the meaning of the entire film for me. Everything up until that point is about Leo battling his guilty sub-conscience. Everything that was perceived to be reality was actually a dream; thus marion cotillard actually woke up when she killed herself. Her visitations were not of Leo's actual construct. She literally wanted him to wake up. Thus even the 'real world' scenes were of Leo's construct. Everything that didn't click with you is everything that really makes the film's logic gel the most. If it had been done bigger and weirder, I think it would have come off as a big 'yeah right' type film. I appreciate Nolan's restraint in some areas. I find it more respectful to an audience's intellect and sensibilties, than say, what micheal bay would have thrown at us. Well, i'm just disappointed we might disagree on this, but that's okay. It's not the first time; but really, why this review bugs me is that I sense that you might not be seeing the whole picture on this particular film, given your reasons for not really getting along with it. You might change your mind in time.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:55 p.m. CST

    Octaveaeon

    by Bob_Dole

    Fatality.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:57 p.m. CST

    wtf...enemy please make a site

    by yourSTEPDADDY

    I think I am officially done with this site...harry dislikes a great movie yet orgasmed off expendables? Please enemy, create IICN.com (isn't it cool news)

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:57 p.m. CST

    So the kids can't go on vacation to see their dad?

    by sadclown

    A game of Twister is less convoluted.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:57 p.m. CST

    Done with this site.

    by TurboKnife

    I have been coming to this site for 10 years but I have never participated in a talkback until now. I am done with this shit. I have defended Harry for years against the claims of being a sellout and a shill but now I am done. I encourage others to go the same rout. There are plenty of sites with reviewers who don't fall asleep or go piss during big films. Used to be a fan of Harry, I even own his book, but I am officially done with this shit. The only time I will read anything associated with Harry again is when his fat ass eventually dies from some fat fuck related illness.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 9:59 p.m. CST

    If I went into this film expecting, like Harry,...

    by Shabado

    to get some Terry Gilliam like surrealist bat-shit crazy dreams, I'm sure Inception wouldn't "fully take" with me either. But I went in knowing it was a Heist film, and it delivered in spades.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:03 p.m. CST

    Felt more like Indigestation.

    by BurnedNotice_Dude

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:03 p.m. CST

    Trying to hard to focus on character work

    by TheJudger

    in a world where the audiance interest is in the promise of experiancing a dream on film. Yeah if nolan ever needed to blow shit up good and go overboard with the special effects. This was that film. Dark city is way beyond better than this movie. I held my breath fearing a nolan lynch mob. Actually you know what. Dark City had wondeful character work, and a really cool fucking effects in play for it's time. Mr hand was some creepy shit.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:04 p.m. CST

    Nolan is probably crying now.

    by The Dark Shite

    Imagine the pain of reading your painstakingly well thought out & brilliantly executed work of art, being trashed by a man with a neck beard.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:04 p.m. CST

    Who gives a shit?

    by DBCOOPER

    Everyone has seen the film by now anyway.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:04 p.m. CST

    chromedome

    by Yelsaeb

    Why would you fast forward through the climax of the movie? And to all the other people who said they started to tune out during the snow scene, what's wrong with you? You start to lose interest in a movie just because one action scene isn't quite as good as the rest of the movie? All you haters think you're cool by hating something that's completely fine.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:05 p.m. CST

    Good for you, Harry

    by tomwaitsisgod

    He didn't pander and kiss the ass of the film no one can stop talking about. He was genuinely unimpressed by it, and at the risk of being unpopular, he said what was truly on his mind. You don't have to like it. His personal integrity remains intact. Personally, I liked Inception, there is so much of it that is really well-done on a technical level, but I agree that it felt like something was missing.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:05 p.m. CST

    jesus christ

    by symon

    I'd respect the opinion of a talented or thoughtful critic who somehow didn't like Inception if it wasn't from the same fucking moron who went gaga over Expendables and any other damn movie he has to like to keep an in somewhere. I know you built this site, Harry, and I"ve been here since the beginning (rarely posting but always reading), but this shit has gone too far. You're an idiot. Let the big boys talk about big boy movies. Stick to your '70s erotica or whatever else the fuck you want to go on and on about you lazy fat fuck.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:10 p.m. CST

    Harry, you're "Michael Bay" audience. Massa is Nolan's audience.

    by ricarleite2

    You're a stupid fat fuck who gets excited by crap like GINO, Bayformers, Phantom Menace. Regardless of how successful this website is, your reviews are worldwide known for being biased, pathetic, laughable at best some times. So, you not liking Inception - and fucking SLEEPING on one of the most exciting and well-directed thrillers out there - only tells how poralized this movie's audiences are. You are part of the morons who didn'r get it - and that, Harry, makes this movie EVEN better. Now, Massa did not sleep on the job EVER, even when watching Daddy Day Camp or Bratz. No, he fucking endured it, and wrote the BEST reviews here. I just PRAY Yoko lets him take over the editorial part of AICN when you die.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:10 p.m. CST

    Every Year....

    by Stormshadow4life

    There seems to be one or two movies that just completely blow me away. Last year it was District 9. This year it was Toy Story 3 and Inception. Reading Harry's ridiculous review of The Expendibles, and reading this review just shows me how much he is out of touch with everything. completely pathetic review.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:11 p.m. CST

    " Capone is a late night raider if you know what I mean"

    by Xiphos_2

    No Harry I don't care to elaborate?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:12 p.m. CST

    good movie VS. CINEMATIC PARADIGM SHIFT!!!

    by maxwell's hammer

    I really liked the film 'Inception'. I don't think it was the best film of the year.<BR> <BR> Why is it so hard for some of you to accept that those two statements aren't mutually exclusive? This is seriously "The Dark Knight" all over again. Just because the Nerd Legion really really likes something, doesn't mean that other people can only like other things at their peril.<BR> <BR> Those of you shitting on the 'Inception' detractors are doing so on no other basis than the fact they disagree with you. Jesus. Can you please be open to the fact that other people might have a different, yet equally valid, take on things?<BR> <BR> And since i'm nothing if not consistent: Seph_J is a knob.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:13 p.m. CST

    also nolans biggest problem is the gadgets

    by TheJudger

    They are so fucking far fetched each and everytime, the bullet recombinator. the mad gas microwave plot for bb. th ebat cell sonar shit from tdk. when we watch the bus leave the bank and fall in line with the other buses. Sometimes someone needs to tel this man hey, brudda, that shit is fucking stupid man. What he does when he does this is he spits it out very quick, and tosses somethign else at you so you dont have time to think about how fucking stupid it is. thw worse was the prestidge, oh fuck who is killing who again. and if it might be you why did you do it, never knowing. I'm sorry that isnt brillance...

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:14 p.m. CST

    Harry's got more balls than most of you morons.

    by ClayG

    It's HIS site, and yet he doesn't ban free exchange of ideas, even when people who don't even know him personally attack HIM, not just his opinions on film. When everyone and their brother is falling head over ass trying to praise this heartless wonder, do you think it's easy to dislike it? I *like* brainy films. I also still like Dark Knight. But Inception misses the mark.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:15 p.m. CST

    Brainstorm? Dreamscape? NMOES:III?

    by thot

    ...better than Inception? I am truly speechless.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:17 p.m. CST

    Moris review

    by TheJudger

    People who use big words. Have small dicks. Somepeople just like to masterbate in public, some have enough poride over the size of their dick to do it with the dick others have to use words to spank the brain. Who goes to hitfix anyways.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:19 p.m. CST

    I meant POLARIZED

    by ricarleite2

    oops

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:20 p.m. CST

    FINALLY!!!!

    by choonie

    Now all of you whiny shitheads who can't think for themselves can stop asking Harry for his review.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:22 p.m. CST

    all the brain blood is in my dick

    by TheJudger

    cause we get blurays of star wars in 2011. i cant spell for shit right now. It's as if a million moms and dads 30 year old basement dwelling kids cried out in pain and were suddenly silenced.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:23 p.m. CST

    Hrry's pissed there aren't VAMPIRES AND WEREWOLVES!

    by RETURN_of_FETT

    Remember that shit? Of all the crap to be pissed at Matric RELOADED ABOUT>>>HE WAS pissed there weren't vampires and fuckin' werewolves in it!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:28 p.m. CST

    And with that, I close the book on Harry Knowles...

    by RockHardTobascoSlimJim

    I will still come here for Quint. But between this, the constant obvious pandering to lesser films where money or goods have obviously changed hands in exchange for said cock slobbering and FUCKING MERRICK AND HIS SON... this site is going the way of the Lucas. George, that is.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:30 p.m. CST

    NOES3>Inception??Can't take your review seriously.

    by Thanos0145

    The rules and reason why dreams couldn't be crazy on the person being Inceptioned were explained.<p>I guess you weren't paying attention. The movie has layers but shouldn't have been hard to follow.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:31 p.m. CST

    Could we be witnessing the growth of Harry balls? ;-)

    by uridylylator

    Your points are all the same as http://bit.ly/cO3j9i

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:33 p.m. CST

    If Harry had balls...

    by jimmy_009

    ..he would pan Shutter Island. In fact most people WOULD have panned Shutter Island if Scorsese hadn't been the director. If it was some anonymous shmuck you'd never heard of it it would be considered in the same category as an Ashley Judd thriller from the late 90's. But because it's Scorsese you dumbasses are giving it undeserved praise -- and at the same time dumping on people that like Inception as just "being on Christopher Nolan's dick". Guess what, it works both ways. Even Scorsese does trash work, and Shutter Island was trash. If you don't have the balls to say so, don't be giving the people who liked the best movie of the summer a hard time. We want MORE movies like Inception, and you twats are dumping on it.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:33 p.m. CST

    Dullception was not good

    by TakingScorpiosCalls

    In time you and your friends on the Endor moon will realize this.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:34 p.m. CST

    Xiphos

    by TakingScorpiosCalls

    He means Capone walks around in drag at night ala the guy who directed Die Another Day/XXX.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:35 p.m. CST

    Dream Warriors

    by VoiceOfSaruman

    Wow. Better than Inception? I can't be the only one who just decided your reviews don't mean anything anymore. Inception is the best movie of the last few years. Fuck the hype. It's just great. P.S. Parnassus was a nice ride, but pretty forgettable now. I'll be thinking about Inception for a long time. Limited imagination??? Go jerk off over the Expendables again, now that you've forgotten your own supremely bad taste.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:37 p.m. CST

    Yelsaeb--easy

    by chromedome

    the ski/snowmobile/snow battle scenes were ordinary, uninspired filler.<p>Nothing "dreamlike" about them, just cheap action flick crap. At that particular stage of the movie, at that duration point in the movie, it needed to be frakkin amazing stuff to hold interest. I was just waiting for the conclusion of that dream layer at that point. "just get on with it" I remember thinking to myself. That cheesy snow fighting was distractingly ordinary in what should have been an engagingly extraordinary film.<p>Like I said, I liked the film, the ambition and thought that created it, the premise and promise of it. But it fell short of its promise and potential. It was a 7 when it shoulda been a 9, 10, or a Spinal Tap 11.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:38 p.m. CST

    You clowns that think Inception wasn't good

    by jimmy_009

    Are fucking retarded. Period. It got glowing reviews, huge box office, and was one of the few original (re: non-sequel or adaptation) films of the year. And you fucknards are bitching about it because you just HAVE to be the guy that decides that there's a Christopher Nolan bandwagon and you get more troll-power if you're not on it.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:39 p.m. CST

    I read this until the point Harry claimed that

    by NoQuarter

    "Shutter Island" was far better than "Inception." Then I stopped. Don't get me wrong--I enjoyed "Shutter Island," but it was no "Inception." I think I'll be skipping Harry's reviews from now on--even when I agree with them, they don't really make any sense.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:39 p.m. CST

    Fair opinion Harry

    by Star Hump

    -- a good take on the movie. Glad you took the time to write up a review.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:40 p.m. CST

    Parnassus forgettable?

    by maxwell's hammer

    I say thee nay, foul fiend! Memories of Lily Cole's cleavage will still haunt my dreams long after Half Price Books shelves will be flooded with used 'Inception' DVDs!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:40 p.m. CST

    The thing that really bothers me is that Harry is about to...

    by RockHardTobascoSlimJim

    Sullen the great and historic name of FAMOUS MONSTERS OF FILMLAND. One can only hope that Quint wises up and starts his own site soon. He's single handedly keeping this site going with his interviews and quality coverage and reviews. <p> It's just kinda sad to see a site that was once a really great place to come and get some views from folks a bit on the level of the common man. Sadly it's now become the Batman & Robin of internet movie sites. Irony, your name be Knowles.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:43 p.m. CST

    So Chris Nolan just called...

    by BP_drills_america_a_new_asshole

    He said Harry is welcome to suck Edgar Wright and Sly's dicks, but he's going to keep his pants tightly zipped. No Nolan cock sucking for you, Harold.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:44 p.m. CST

    Ohhhhhhh FUUUUCK you and your excuses

    by D.Vader

    Fucking amateur. You NEVER should have written this review. That ship sailed over a MONTH ago. Should have just let it be instead of stirring up this hornets nest. Oy, I shouldn't have had a bottle of wine with no food on 6 hrs of sleep in two days.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:44 p.m. CST

    Christopher Nolan's date night

    by maxwell's hammer

    Mr. Nolan doesn't need Harry to suck his dick. There are plenty of people in this talkback who have that job covered in spades.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:44 p.m. CST

    And in TEN FUCKING YEARS, they have yet to add...

    by RockHardTobascoSlimJim

    A motherfucking EDIT FUNCTION!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:46 p.m. CST

    lol Wow Harry you once again prove...

    by Davidia

    That you are a child. Just hurry up and die of obesity. Posting this shit at fanboys requests. Also, you're wrong, but then again Nolan never gave an interview, so I'm sure that played into it

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:47 p.m. CST

    Octaveaeon

    by Dawhiteguy

    To quote, "One could therefore argue that it builds upon themes introduced in the Prestige and his Batman movies; the craft of movie-making as magic, and the [political] power of images." You are forgetting an essential movie. One that is key to unlocking the decipher art within Inception. Our totem, of which derives it's name through such a similarity, while also another movie directed by Christoper Nolan. Though how many people will walk out of the theater with an passive understanding of this movie, compared to an active?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:48 p.m. CST

    Your excuse last time was something like...

    by D.Vader

    "I need to see it again before I review it bc I feel it's the kind of movie one needs to witness many times to understand it's depth." <p> Now the excuse is "I fell asleep and missed 40 minutes." Whatever man. Either one line is bullshit or they both are.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:48 p.m. CST

    Harry I hope you like your new asshole

    by BP_drills_america_a_new_asshole

    that we've ripped for you. Now Edgar Wright and Sly can both fuck you at once. And hopefully you'll die from a ruptured anal artery.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:58 p.m. CST

    HARRY: THERE'S YOUR FUCKING INCEPTION REVIEW, NOW FUCK OFF!

    by JudasPriestly

    JACKASSES.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:58 p.m. CST

    Memento is still Nolan's best

    by sunwukong86

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:59 p.m. CST

    "I'll give you a review after Comic con"

    by D.Vader

    "I need to see it again bc it's the kind of deep movie that needs multiple viewings to understand." <p> "I fell asleep the first time." <p> Just tell us the truth.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 10:59 p.m. CST

    attenion: 'Inception' lovers

    by maxwell's hammer

    Can one of you tell the BP_drills and Davidia guys to shut the fuck up? They're giving you all a bad name. Wishing death on someone who disagrees with you about a movie? Really?<BR> <BR> Name calling? Fine. Fat jokes? Kind of douchy and not my bag, but okay, whatever. But violent death fantasies?<BR> <BR> I kind of want to like 'Inception' less just so I'm not on the same side of the arguement as those guys.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11 p.m. CST

    I agree Harry...

    by zinc_chameleon

    because I figured out what was going on when Ariadne found Dom in the basement, hooking up to a dream machine. She is just way too mature and balanced for a 20-year old, and then the scene is an abrupt (read REM state) shift from the previous scene. She is clearly a projection of what is best (and worst) in Dom, creating M.C. Escher buildings on one hand, and ignoring his warnings about creating buildings from memory. After that, it was just a dream-movie, nowhere near as deep as Memento, where we see Lenny's last day on earth (just before Natalie phones Dodd) and we care about him. For all the grim faces, and pounding music, I never felt that there was anything at stake. The dream technology just wasn't real enough for me (Cerebro made much more sense), and so I just enjoyed my quality popcorn, and my free pass.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11 p.m. CST

    Anyone lese get a "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" homage feel.

    by ufoclub1977

    from some of Inception? I was underwhelmed by some of it (just like I wasn't that into Dark Knight which did have great cinematography, music, and effects...) but by the time Inception ended I did like it. I think it trancended my irritation I have with Nolan overblowing it with the operatic music when the story doesn't support the entire horm section blasting off with BASS. But in the end I did like Inception. A lot more than Dark Knight. The best parts of the batman movie were the villain which were great. The parts with Batman were stupid.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:01 p.m. CST

    Okay...

    by Fletch Gannon

    He didn't like Toy Story 3, didn't like Inception...but had an orgasm over The Expendables...yeah I'm not reading anymore of his review anymore. His taste in movies is shit.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:03 p.m. CST

    Moronic Maxwell

    by Davidia

    I wish death on harry not for his opinion, even though I think it wrong. I wish death on him because he just did nothing but look like a weakling instigating douchebag by reviewing a movie a month to late just because his... "fanbase" wants him to. I.e. he fell to the pressure of these people and in that will do nothing but create a backlash. This is typical behavior of this socially askew mutant, and not the first time his insecurities have shined through his administrative actions.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:03 p.m. CST

    So

    by kolchak

    Harry admits that this movie was "deep" in his previous excuse for not posting a review, then mentions nothing of the film's themes or depth in said review.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:04 p.m. CST

    In my dreams I'm beautiful AND bad!

    by Kraven Morehead

    Ah Dreamwarriors. With that said, Inception is a decent movie in a below average summer. I'm not sure if that is one of the reasons for its popularity. It has some insightful things to say about dreams and living a life but is only borderline interesting when it comes to the overall narrative. BTW, I don't care how good a dream-warrior Leo is (or whatever his title is) but when you're dragging your own personal Freddy Kreuger into these dreams (Marion Cotialard) you should probably retire because you're a detriment to the team. Like a Hall of Fame athlete who will never be cut from a team but can never walk away gracefully and thus they hurt the team more than they help it.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:07 p.m. CST

    Best part of this review

    by SlickyVonBoner

    "Capone is a late night raider if you know what I mean. So there I was at 10am, a tad sore," Haha. Harry, you choice of words are priceless, like the overuse of the words tickled and giggled. Always a good laugh.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:10 p.m. CST

    Davidia

    by maxwell's hammer

    Yes, and using the anonymity of the internet to throw around hyperbolic vitriol and death wishes isn't a sign of social awkwardness or insecurity at all.<BR> <BR> State your case and move on, dude. What is the point of being so ugly about it? Do you honestly think being so melodramatically obnoxious will make people more likely to see things your way?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:10 p.m. CST

    The Ski scene was SUPPOSED to be a lame Bond imitation.

    by dailysportspages

    Think about who was dreaming. <br> The guy looked like the type of over confident douche bag who probably spends time in the mirror holding his fingers up in the form of a pistol pretending he's secret agent and humming the James Bond theme. <br> He's a pretentious rich kid who probably does go on regular holidays to these ultra exclusive ski resorts open to only the elites of europe. <br> So his subconscious puts it all together to form this narrative. <br> <br> Anyway, the movie is not about any of that. <br> This movie at its heart is dealing with the same themes as Shutter Island and the late Sergio Leone's final move Once Upon A Time In America. <br> All three are masterpieces dealing with the same thing. They just all wrap different plots and stories around it. <br><br> OUATIA wraps it around a Crime Drama, Shutter Island around a Noir Mystery, and Inception around a Sci-Fi Heist film.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:12 p.m. CST

    And yet you loved The Expendables.

    by DanielPlainviewOnVacationInBoston

    What's the point in reading your reviews anymore? I'm done. I'll stick with Quint, Capone and Massawyrm, thank you.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:15 p.m. CST

    whatever Harry...

    by Duty

    You ruined it for yourself when you saw it tired... derp

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:16 p.m. CST

    HARRY

    by pr0g2west

    You say that it wasn't imaginative enough? Terry Gilliam creates more of the LSD induced types of dream sequences. Inception is pure subconcious, not hyperconcious. Not all dreams have to be crazy and insane and twisted...sometimes dreams are pretty realistic and true to life. Which is why when your dreaming, you don't know it, you think its all real. And thats what 'Inception' accomplished, the film felt real to me, dreams felt like real dreams, not like mind bending abstract renderings of an artists vision.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:19 p.m. CST

    No, Maxwell.

    by Davidia

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:20 p.m. CST

    Urgh, No Maxwell

    by Davidia

    Obviously it is an exaggeration of my feelings, but I do hate him. Throwing around "OMG U USING INTERNET PUSSY!" means nothing, as you're doing the same. This is a public forum, which despite its internet implications also means a group of people free to speak their minds

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:21 p.m. CST

    Octaveaeon

    by CherryValance

    I just finished reading that. The last time I read a movie theory that long I think it was for LOST HIGHWAY. Anyhoo, I don't think it's meant to be that complicated. It could be but, I feel like we're too obsessed with loops. LOST didn't end with a loop as much as people wanted it too, and you've managed to get Inception into a loop. But when I watched the movie and I was worried about the characters being in peril I was worried that Cobb would run out of time and end up in limbo and/or dead. Why would he make a limbo state the thing to be avoided if Cobb was already in limbo?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:21 p.m. CST

    Hairy Harry

    by Shalako

    You really are a pathetic fuck. You have zero writing skill. Your reviews aren’t funny or illuminating or witty and your beard is disgusting. Maybe you mean for it to be a kind of physical trademark, like Gene Shalit’s mustache. But, it makes you look like trying to hide your fat neck. You resemble a Jim Henson puppet gone bad, like something made of pork and yarn. Like the freakish offspring of Frank Herbert and an orangutan. I hope my sincerity is coming through. I’m being genuine when I say that you should be housed behind glass at a local zoo, swinging from a tire and eating your own vomit.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:23 p.m. CST

    Well with Harry's film career

    by Fletch Gannon

    rocketing into the the stratosphere I guess that makes him an expert on what makes a great movie...please someone create another website we can all congregate to!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:25 p.m. CST

    Shalako...

    by Fletch Gannon

    You crack me up! HAHAHAH!

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:27 p.m. CST

    Dr_PepperSpray

    by DanielPlainviewOnVacationInBoston

    Shutter Island screened way early for BNAT. Harry likes that kind of thing. He doesn't really take the quality into account sometimes. Although I do love me some Shutter Island.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:27 p.m. CST

    Pilgrim #4. Suck it!

    by JuanSanchez

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:27 p.m. CST

    Good Review

    by Gwynplaine

    Inception is not very good.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:31 p.m. CST

    Davidia...

    by maxwell's hammer

    Well, bud, I'm not questioning your right to say what you want and share your opinion. Yes, you can say anything you want to. I'm wondering *why* you'd chose to express yourself in the manner you've selected.<BR> <BR> There's room for a lot of various opinions on this site, some more coherent than others. We all come in here and throw our thoughts at each other and its chaotic and messy and sometimes people get rude and offensive but whatever.<BR> <BR> But how does stuff like "hopefully you'll die from a ruptured anal artery" and "hurry up and die of obesity" contribute in any way? You seem to want people to share with you the opinion that 'Inception' is massively awesome, but everytime one of you wishes violent death on Harry, I like it less and less, and I'm kind of pissed at you guys about that, because I actually liked the damned movie, and resent that you are making me associate like it with you.<BR> <BR> Yes, you're free to say anything you want on the internet. But what does it say about you that you're chosing THAT as your thing to say?

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:32 p.m. CST

    Inception

    by Gwynplaine

    was pretty bad actually. Good review.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:34 p.m. CST

    Harry: the ski sequence is the opening level of nintendo goldene

    by UltraTron

    Perhaps it's Nolan's favorite videogame or there because that character played the shit out of it. And the girl and levitt are Leo's kids. They've been trying to wake him up for years. Just kidding

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:34 p.m. CST

    Why would a businessman heir have fantastical dreams?

    by BrokenHeath

    And Leo is into espionage so his dreams wouldn't be fantasy based either so your argument doesn't have much weight - you're simply wanting to see what your dream worlds would be like and that's not what the movie is about. I think they ended up revealing too many of the wow moments in the previews and commercials so it ruined the movie a bit for me as I knew what beats were coming. I thought the last half of the movie was still very successful.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:35 p.m. CST

    Let me get this straight...

    by codecrackx15

    You didn't really like inception but you had a joygasm for that overrated pathetic star wars clip??? Inception was awesome and your star wars clip was crap like everything about the Star Wars universe. There I said it. I used to like Star Wars but honestly I will never watch original or prequel ever again because it is overrated crap that has been sold out like a European hooker in the middle east.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:35 p.m. CST

    Maxwell

    by Davidia

    I am truly sorry I am going to give you nightmares and sincerely apologize. If harry lets what I say abut him get to him, than he's in worse trouble than I thought.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:38 p.m. CST

    Pretty good review.

    by Gwynplaine

    Good job,Harry.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:39 p.m. CST

    And once again you show that you REALLY know nothing about film.

    by elgato73

    And that's you Harry Knowles. I've been coming to this site since it was created and over the last couple of years I really just could not give two shits whether this site continues or not. You throw superlatives and hyperbolic praise onto an absolute piece of shit like The Expendables and here with Nolan's Inception you think the studio trumped his vision? What fucking planet are you on? You've got Sylvester Stallone and all your other B, C, D, E, and Z grade talented friends stuck so far up your fat crippled ass that you don't even know what's decent anymore. Far better writers on this site have reviewed Inception and had something intelligent to say about it. You know what Harry, you and George Lucas should get together and fuck each other in the ass because you both are mediocrity whores...

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:40 p.m. CST

    Oh, and Brainscan sucked.

    by JuanSanchez

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:41 p.m. CST

    Nolan < Kubrick

    by cymbalta4thedevil

    as De Palma is < Hitchcock. <br /><br />Discuss...

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:41 p.m. CST

    Maxwell

    by kolchak

    Your opinion shouldn't be hampered by you not liking some of the people that share it. <p> I'm against war. So is that asshat Keith Olbermann. But listening to Olbermann doesn't make me cheer on the military.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:41 p.m. CST

    Davidia

    by maxwell's hammer

    Dude, you're not giving me nightmares. You're that guy at the bar nobody wants to stand next to because he smells bad but he won't leave you alone and keeps asking everybody for cab fare and we kind of like this bar but don't actually want to come back if there's a chance you're going to be there again.<BR> <BR> Or at least that's what the ugly comments make you sound like. Ditch the vitriol and just state your opinion and we can just be two guys having a vigerous arguement about cinema.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:43 p.m. CST

    INCEPTION:

    by PRESIDENT BALTAR

    Before dishing up a negative review of Inception, I have a confession to make: except for Memento, I have never been a fan of Chris Nolan’s films. In general, they strike me as cold, trudging exercises in technical show-offery. As my grandmother once said to me after a seal show at Sea World: “I was amazed, but not amused.” With that out of the way, let me say that Inception really just isn’t that great of a film. It has two main weaknesses: narrative sloppiness and weak characterization. As far as I’m concerned, the latter is the more egregious of the two, but the former is less endemic to modern big-budget filmmaking, and really strikes as the heart of what people like about Inception, so I’m going to spend most of my time discussing the sloppiness (Warning: spoilers ahead.) Any film has its own internal logic. In The Matrix, humans are necessary as power sources for the AIs. In Blade Runner, androids are identified by a Turing-type test. Do either of these make sense? No. But we accept them for the duration of the film – we suspend disbelief – because that makes it fun. When a film starts contradicting and playing fast-and-loose with its internal logic, however, it is punishing you for suspending disbelief. And this is what Inception does at every turn. For example, take the “limbo” dream-state, in which you are trapped if you happen to “die” in a dream while under sedation. Apparently you get out of limbo by…dying again? How does that make sense? And how does this make limbo a threatening prospect? “Oh no, I have to kill myself TWICE!”…? Then there is the “kick” that is used to wake someone up from a deeper dream level. In the example at the beginning of the movie, a kick at the upper dream level is sufficient to pull DiCaprio (or “Dom Cobb” as he is known in the movie, which is odd because he doesn’t look Burmese at all) out of the lower dream level. But in the film’s climax sequence, it seems as if a simultaneous kick at the lower dream level is also required for the kick trick to work. Even putting aside the fact that the time-dilation between dream levels would make simultaneous kicks INCREDIBLY hard to arrange, this seems like a pointless change of the rules. And then there is the issue of “dream powers”. If I can pull a grenade launcher out of nowhere in a dream (as a guy does in one scene), why can’t I fly? Or strike my dream-enemies down with a well-placed meteor? And if Cobb and his wife can age a lifetime in dream-limbo and then restore themselves to full youth right before they lay their heads on the train tracks, why does Saito let himself get old when he’s stuck in limbo? Etc. The list goes on, but I’m already running out of righteous indignation. The fact is, these holes in the film’s logic are not negatives for the film either commercially or critically, because what people enjoy about a film like this is the chance to argue about it afterward. Inception is a hit because it allows people to spend hours debating whether or not DiCaprio is REALLY dreaming at the film’s end, or what this or that little visual cue meant about what was REALLY happening. Of course, these debates never end, because the film is so sloppy, so careless with its own rules and logic, that any detail or anomaly could potentially be a deliberate cue, or it could simply be a piece of lazy writing. Nolan can’t lose. So if people are happy with the film’s incoherence, why am I unhappy? Because I suspect that this “feature” was accidental. Sloppiness is on display throughout the entire film (as when the pronunciation of Ken Watanabe’s character changes from “SAY-toe” to “SIGH-toe”), leading me to believe that many of the little discrepancies that so delight fans and critics are just dirt on the lens. And while people might call Nolan a genius for setting up a story structure that makes an asset out of sloppiness, I have to say that this just bores the hell out of me. Come on, now…everybody hates the “And I woke up, and it was all a dream” ending, don’t they? So why do people like a movie that sets itself up from Minute One so that the ONLY possible ending is a big fat question mark as to whether or not it was all a dream? Inception’s ending is the most telegraphed punch in film history. If this qualifies as a “mindfuck,” then I guess I like sex to be spontaneous. But even if the film were as tight and clever as, say, Twelve Monkeys (or, say, as Memento), I still would have had to stifle the urge to walk out halfway through. To explain why, let me write a sentence I’ve written many times before, and will sadly write many times again: I just didn’t care what happened to the characters. I’m not sure if weak characterization is more common in recent big-budget films, or if only films that have strong human stories are able to become classics after the novelty of their special effects becomes dated. Either way, I think I’m less tolerant of weak characters than much of both the film-watching public and the film-critiquing elites. Even if a film is a good intellectual exercise (which Inception is not), it’s generally not enough to hold my interest for 2.5 hours; after all, I get plenty of intellectual exercise in my PhD program. What I need is to care about the characters. And in Inception, as in all of Chris Nolan’s films except Memento, I did not care. The movie is filled with the stock characters that have become a sort of standardized shorthand for the theater-going public – the business mogul, the technical specialist, the serious assistant. As for the protagonist, the film resorts to what is rapidly becoming my most hated filmic cliche: the “perfect wife and kids” characterization. (Let me take a second to elaborate on this particular peeve of mine. Film critics will rant and rave against “pet the dog” characterization, where a protagonist is shown to be sympathetic by doing some random act of kindness. Well, these days, action movies try to make you like the guy in front of the camera by showing those glowy slow-mo sequences with him and his looks-ten-years-younger-than-she’s-supposed-to-be wife and his pair of smiling towheaded children. You know the movies I’m talking about. Inception is one of them.) Add to this the fact that Leo DiCaprio will never ever be a good actor, and that Marion Cotilllard did a weak job as well, and even the quality acting skills of Joseph Gordon-Levittt and Ken Watanabe couldn’t make me care whether or not all of these people were thrown into eternal dream-limbo or not. In Memento, I shared an emotional connection with the protagonist through his fear; I sympathized with the hideous, nightmare terror of daily memory loss. I understood Leonard Shelby’s rage, his desperation, his fear, and so I wanted him to win. In Inception, all I could think was that if I woke up and found I had Dom Cobb’s ideal life, I would probably go back to dream limbo where I could dream myself up a grenade launcher. Sloppiness and weak characterization were enough to sink the film from my point of view, but there were little things too. There was precisely one moment of levity in the film: the scene where Joseph Gordon-Levitt tricks Ellen Page into kissing him. That was it. You’d think humor and warmth wouldn’t be a “little thing,” but in the Age of Nolan they’re more of an unexpected bonus when they do occur. And why didn’t we get to see more of the dream-producing technology? Apparently in the script, the technology is called PASIVE (Portable Automated Somnacin IntraVEnous). Good thing someone somewhere bothered to write down that train-wreck of an acronym; I’d probably have gone with WHOOPDESHIT (Weak Hole-filled Overly Obvious Plot DEvice SHIT). All in all in all, Inception is best summed up by the unintentionally hilarious line DiCaprio tosses off to explain why his and his wife’s idea of dream-heaven was an infinite forest of rectangular office towers: “We love buildings of this type.” Chris Nolan decided he loved films of this type, and set out to make one without worrying overmuch about details like logical coherence, characterization, and humor. And the public ate it up. Um…I’m looking for a devastatingly witty ending line here…think I’ll just go with: WHOOPDESHIT.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:44 p.m. CST

    Amen, Harry!

    by MaleSheep

    Amen! I totally agree with you. It could have gone so much farther and been so much greater for it. This movie was weak.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:47 p.m. CST

    Just so everyone knows that you never see reality

    by UltraTron

    in the movie and are never awake. Leo never woke and his wife and micheal Kane are trying to wake him up the whole movie.They even say all that corporate espionage is bullshit. His wife and Kane used the espionage to get him to come out of it finally.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:48 p.m. CST

    Inception is a movie where

    by ThrowMeTheIdol

    If you know a lot about the plot it simply won't work for you and Harry probably knew quite a bit going in.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:49 p.m. CST

    Harry'll come around, some movies have to stew under the beard.

    by Stereotypical Evil Archer

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:52 p.m. CST

    President Baltar

    by CherryValance

    I didn't think the kicks had to be simultaneous. You just had to wake up from the deepest level, then the next, and next until you wake up in real life. Like opening a series of doors. You don't open them all at once. You have to open the first before you can open the second, etc., etc.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:54 p.m. CST

    Overrated? Obviously someone still likes it..

    by Sicuv Uyall

    It's still making money. Funny, how the few that always make the biggest use of the word. There's always the 3% of the population that say meat is overrated too, and they tend to be the biggest douchebags. And go see Scott Pilgrim.

  • Aug. 14, 2010, 11:59 p.m. CST

    No.

    by JordanHunt

    i am a long time reader of AICN. this is my first time participating in the talkbacks. i've always respected the reviews and interviews put up on this site. All articles are always insightful and interesting to read. Almost all of the reviewers on the site i usually agree with on movies. the person i most disagree with is Harry, although ive always respected his opinion as a fellow movie lover. However, after reading this, I just cant stay silent any longer. I completely and utterly disagree with Harry. I get that some people just dont connect with some movies. And Harry even concedes that its a film ripe for discussion. But I personally just cannot fathom someone not being even somewhat moved or affected by this movie. I'll admit im a bit biased towards nolan simply because im a life long batman fan, and no one has interpreted batman better on the big screen as he has, but inception is something so wholly original and thrilling that i am just truly baffled that even Harry cannot get enjoyment out of it. I still try to respect everyone's opinion, but No, i just cant agree with Harry's.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, midnight CST

    Octaveaeon

    by antonphd

    I actually read all of that. Nice. I caught the cobol reference too... i just thought it was a variant of Cobb. I ended up concluding(as best as one can) that the whole thing is just Cobb working out life in one of his dreams. Everything from being 007 to getting stuck in a tight space to people who are totally disconnected from each other saying the same things to him over and over. And the fact that he yells at... I forget his name... his boring but dependable sidekick... when they discover that their target has been trained to deal with people invading his dreams... he says 'you were meant to deal with this'. Not you were supposed to. You were meant to. He invented all of these people. It's all one dream he is having. He is just not aware that he is dreaming. Maybe Nolan is doing more with this film. I have watched it twice and I am pretty darn good at catching big picture patterns. It's what I do for a living. But maybe there is a bigger picture than I am seeing. Also... it seems like the kind of dream I would have to be honest. Though I have never had dreams within dreams that happened in parallel. I have just woken up from a dream in a dream and then again and again and again. I had telekinesis and I was able to fly. When I realized that I had dreamed of this(many many many times) I tried to wake up but I then only dreamed I woke up. Then I had the idea that maybe my dreams had always been some way for my mind to teach me to use these powers and I would try them out and they would work in real life! And then I would wonder if I had not actually woke up. Then I would dream I woke up. And again and again and then finally I really woke up and no matter how hard I tried to throw the alarm clock across the room with my mind I could not. :P Anyway. I enjoy that the movie was a puzzle to try to solve.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:07 a.m. CST

    Idiots! Michael Caine = Leo's wife!

    by JuanSanchez

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:09 a.m. CST

    ok

    by cecil1

    i wasn't gonna knock your review until you equated Inception with a fucking Freddy movie? Even if you don't like it you must give it credit for its ambition. Be careful, before you know it the general public will crave more Transformer movies before ones that make you think; another spoke in the dumbing down of America

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:09 a.m. CST

    Guys...

    by Red Ned Lynch

    ...I've seen pretty much everything this summer (missed The A Team but I think that's probably okay for the purpose of this discussion. And I liked Inception. By my reckoning it was the second best movie of the summer behind Toy Story 3. But... <p> ...someone above suggested it was a movie they would one day be excited to introduce to their children. No, it's not that good. I just checked Metacritic, where they rated it at 74%. And that seems just about right. This was a good but not exceptional movie. <p> And understand, I am as happy as anyone to get an original film and a film that doesn't feel compelled to dumb down or over-explain every single thing happening. In the current movie environment that is extremely admirable and I am very happy that Inception is all but certain to make enough money to be considered a win. But that doesn't make it a masterpiece. <p> Inception isn't a masterpiece. It's the second best film of the summer and the best grownup movie by a pretty wide margin. <p> As for Nolan, he is a director with a superb visual style and the daring to swing for the fences, and I have been and will continue to be excited to see what he does next. But he is not yet a great director. <p> Great directors can break your heart with a single shot, they can pull you so deep into a character that you have a hard time sorting yourself out. Great directors provide more than visual feasts or fun roller coaster rides or middling intellectual exercises. Great directors make films that engage the heart. Nolan must still take that all important step. <p> Is Nolan better than Ratner and Watersports Anderson and their ilk? Of course, so much better that he is barely of the same species. Is he better than Snyder? Sure, and you know I still have pretty high hopes for Snyder one day making a whole movie, even though 300 was the cinematic equivalent of a twelve year old boy masturbating into his underwear while watching an Ultimate Fighting Championship. He is one of the best and most promising directors working today. But damn, guys. <p> In 2006 two movies were released about stage magicians. One was a mature work with extraordinary performances, a plot where actual stage magic wound a clockwork plot into a truly magical story that revealed heartbreaking truths about the human spirit. <p> The other one was The Prestige. The Prestige was one gimmick laid over another until they collapsed into a basement containing one of the most ridiculous reveals in recent cinema. The female characters (and although he has come closest with Inception Nolan has never created a fully actualized female character, which is another step still ahead of him) were the most shallow plot moving foils. And there was very little genuine in the film's linchpin relationship, that between Bale and Jackman. Compared to the relationship between Norton and Giamatti in The Illusoinist it was a one dimensional cartoon. <p> Harry's review of Inception is an outlier, and I agree it's fairly wide of the mark. But it's no farther off in its direction than an awful lot of the comments in this talkback are off in the other.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:10 a.m. CST

    NEVER FORGET... Harry liked Van Helsing.

    by JuanSanchez

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:11 a.m. CST

    Oh, and Flickapoo...

    by Red Ned Lynch

    ...damn it! It didn't help. I still did it.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:11 a.m. CST

    Octaveaeon: Important point regarding beginning/end

    by Bob_Dole

    The first scene with Old Saito is not the same as the last scene with old Saito. Different dialogue, etc. I really think people are missing something there and perhaps you've done a decent job at explaining it. Why show what appears to be the same scene twice, yet it's not? Also, why make such a scene the first thing we see in the film? Good questions?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:20 a.m. CST

    JordanHunt and Red Ned Lynch

    by maxwell's hammer

    You guys seem to have slightly differing opinions on the film, but I had trouble understanding your points, what with the glaring lack of fat jokes and death threats.<BR> <BR> (Kudos to both of you for demonstrating how to have a civil difference of opinion)

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:20 a.m. CST

    Shutter Island vs. Inception

    by OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOUUUUUUUUUUTTTTTLLLLLAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAWWWWW

    It was okay; kind of predictable, but it was decent. Overall, I enjoyed Inception more. My main complaint with Inception is the same complaint I have for Prestige -- the story structured a little too tightly. (And I love The Prestige.) Everything is wrapped in a nice little bow. I think the biggest surprise in Inception for me was the fact that there wasn't an additional dream layer. Going into it I was completely expecting the team to complete their mission and for DiCaprio to get the resolution he was looking for. When they got to the final dream layer I was then expecting them to jump all the way back to the plane and then... I was expecting the airplane to begin to crash. And in free fall, they would get kicked one more time. That didn't happen and it was great. If it were any other amateur film maker, I don't think they would've been able to resist. "Let's put it a surprise ending!" "Yeah!" *high five* It's something M. Night would do.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:22 a.m. CST

    Sh-boom Sh-Boom

    by Chain

    I thought that Devin Faraci over at CHUD had an excellent take on the film. http://www.chud.com/articles/articles/24477/1/NEVER-WAKE-UP-THE-MEANING-AND-SECRET-OF-INCEPTION/Page1.html

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:23 a.m. CST

    If you people don't like Harry's opinion,

    by John_McClanes_Vest

    writing, weight or website...then do the rest of us a favour and fuck off!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:23 a.m. CST

    D VADER

    by vincebell

    right?! dude, my post is just a little further above yours, but ive been saying the exact same thing as you: harry is not being honest whatsoever. something else entirely is going on. harry's just being full of shit & contradicting himself left and right. a little honesty about the whole thing would renew my faith in the guy, because i can understand someone enjoying the expendables more than inception, but i cannot see how an established film critic can insinuate that nolan is a weak filmmaker, especially after the way harry gushed about TDK. i 100% agree with you - we are being fed a ton of bullshit on the whole matter.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:27 a.m. CST

    If you ask 10 different people what Inception is about..

    by ganymede3010

    You'll get 10 different answers. The movie is far to ambiguous. He tried way to hard. I was more entertained by Iron Man2.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:29 a.m. CST

    Endless Exposition = movie for dummies...

    by Flip63Hole

    I LOVE how they explained EVERYTHING for you. I'm pretty sure at one point the archetypes were breaking the third wall and talking straight to the audience; "hey audience, this is what's about to happen and why. I know we don't have time to show backstory or character development, but we did show you a dream city bending on top of itself if you need CG work to keep you interested in the movie." Some heavily explained, geeked out concepts, some mindless action and not an ounce of heart. But yeah, takes a lot of brains to appreciate a fight in zero gravity in a dream. Two guys floating around and fighting? Wow. I remember it being much more exciting in Moonraker. So exciting I busted out my iPhone and played Solitaire. It was such a FX masturbation-fest I kept looking around for Michael Bay. And I thought Wanted was the worst, dumbed-down Matrix clone...

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:30 a.m. CST

    maxwell's hammer...JordanHunt

    by Red Ned Lynch

    ...first the obligatory: I'll kill you all with fatty foods. And then thank you. <p> And thank you for mentioning Jordan. <p> Welcome to the world of talkbacking, Jordan. Hope you stick around and do more. And hey, we do agree about one thing. Nolan's done Batman proud.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:30 a.m. CST

    No Stallone in Inception

    by disfigurehead

    means Harry hates,

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:31 a.m. CST

    Good one Max

    by Davidia

    But I sincerely wonder why you have to be so VULGAR in your opinion of me! What mean things to say! Stop hiding behind your internet anonymity dude! Before I go I have one question, on a scale of 1-10 how bad is your downs syndrome?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:34 a.m. CST

    Excellent cast, poor execution

    by TheWaqman

    I liked the second half of the film though. And the vault reveal is one of Nolan's best shots ever. Overall though this film was a bit disappointing when I look at it. Nolan shouldn't write his own script. Shoulda asked his brother again.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:34 a.m. CST

    yea, but Van Helsing had whatshername

    by chromedome

    in tight fitting outfits! Same reason we like Underworld, right. Different criteria altogether, dude!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:36 a.m. CST

    Inception was better than Kickass & Toy Story 3

    by BetterCallSaul

    but not as good as Avatar or Scott Pilgrim. To each his own

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:39 a.m. CST

    oy vey

    by maxwell's hammer

    Stay classy, Davidia.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:39 a.m. CST

    different interpretations...

    by cecil1

    that's the great thing about the movie! Just like great art or music; the best works are those that spark debate and different interpretations. Fuck all you haters, go watch Jackass 3d

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:43 a.m. CST

    btw

    by cecil1

    tell me the last movie where people were debating it months later... Mr Nolan, please keep the bar high.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:44 a.m. CST

    Yeah, OK Harry

    by SmrtGuy82

    Coming from the guy that obviously is a sell-out. Yeah, the new Nightmare on Elm Street is a good movie. You are an ugly asshole who is desperate to try and seem still relevant. And I will seriously fight anyone that defends him. Seriously. E-mail SmrtGuy1982@yahoo.com and meet me in NYC anywhere so I can kick your ginger loving asshole. I figure all of you are pussies though and not capable of any type of human interaction. I'm waiting, ladies

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:47 a.m. CST

    chromedome...

    by Red Ned Lynch

    ...fine, bad as Underworld was it did have Kate Beckinsale in skintight leather outfits, and for ten-fifteen minute bursts (bad word choice, there) on cable that is sufficient. <p> But for Van Helsing it would have taken Beckinsale, Jovovich, Mitra, Larter, Dawson, Lokken...and all the other action actresses I'm forgetting...in a hot oil battle royale. <p> I mean they had Q's Vatican branch workshop. They turned poor Faramir into Sancho Panza. They put someone's face in the clouds at the end of the movie. <p> Besides, you can see the same movie actually done competently and with some heart by watching Captain Kronos, Vampire Hunter. And it had Caroline Munro, who, when you think about it, was kind of the Kate Beckinsale of her day.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:49 a.m. CST

    Well at least you were honest Harry!

    by Evangelion217

    Personally, I think the film will get better for you with repeated viewings. Kinda like with my experience with "Blade Runner." But I was really rooting for the character of Cobb's in "Inception." I wanted him to succeed, and it was heart breaking to see that he didn't, which makes the ending so powerful and impacting with it's originality. I was emotionally impacted by the film, but it's not as emotionally resonating as "Memento", "The Dark Knight", or "Batman Begins." But it's probably his best script to date, and I was amazed by the imagination that Nolan put me through. I also loved "Shutter Island", but it was too drawn out, long winded, and predictable to be considered a great film. So I definitely prefer "Inception." :)

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:50 a.m. CST

    Kiilk

    by cecil1

    you haven't seen the movie; your post is irrelevant, next

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:52 a.m. CST

    Van Helsing and Inception

    by antonphd

    The way Harry feels about these films reveals a lot about him. Mainly. He likes to feel good. Have fun. He's got a big imagination and he loves to have his imagination matched by art. There is nothing wrong with that. I loved Van Helsing. I know it's trash. But, as Harry says, so is sugar cereal but it still tastes good. That is exactly how I feel about it. And I can see why Inception felt bland to Harry. It's probably just what he says. He prefers a film in a dream to have more fantastical fun. He wants the scene in The Matrix where Neo flies up into the sky in the end. Cause that is what Harry would do if he were in the movie. But that's the thing about Harry and many movie goers. The movies transport them. They go on a journey. Kind of like a dream. They put themselves in the place of the characters and live through them. We all do that really. Harry just didn't have a good time in Nolan's dream. Not a big deal. Harry doesn't write critiques of films he writes about his thoughts and feelings having experienced a film. This review is the same as all of his other reviews. Reviews for some people are about deciding where to 'stand' on a film. I find that to be about as fucking pathetic as reading a magazine to find out what to wear this season. It's fine for people who want to be apart of a herd. But for those of us who just want to say something about art... a review is just an expression. It's not about grading the film like this is a contest. It's just about talking about a film. That's it. If you want to feel like you belong because of what you think of a film or if you want to feel smart because you graded a film... you are on the wrong movie website. This is aint it cool.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:56 a.m. CST

    i understand

    by cecil1

    hey, not knocking Harry, i luv this site, will be coming back for as long as its around. The only problem i have right now is that Harry equated a Freddy movie with Inception; i must sleep on that one.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:57 a.m. CST

    Nolan is a cold filmmaker, that's why he's wrong for Superman

    by Kal Reeve

    He has no business "godfathering" Superman. The World's Greatest Superhero requires a visionary with a vibrant sense for the fantastic.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:57 a.m. CST

    HARRY'S INCEPTION

    by Nerd Rage

    This talkback is a shared dream and Harry's on a mission to implant an idea in everyone's head. That idea is that Inception isn't so great. But Harry said Dream Warriors was better and it alerted everyone's subconscious. Now Harry's running for his life as everyone's subconscious tries to kill him. BUUUUUURRRRR BUUUUUURRRRR

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:58 a.m. CST

    My two cents

    by _Lizarkeo

    Inception, Shutter Island and Dr. Parnassus are all great movies from great directors with great actors. I prefer Terry's movie, an original and very personal tale. Terry rocks. Seconded by Shutter Island (still my best movie of the year), awesome soundtrack, atmosphere, photography and acting (you get two movies in one). And for last, Nolan's original fiction. The simultaneous kick - at the end - was super cool, but not unforgettable cool. The action scenes (except the zero gravity one) were...weak, just like watching someone playing a predictable game (maybe because they were inside a dream). Waking Life is a better movie about dreaming, no doubt. And still waiting for Scott Pilgrim to arrive here, sigh. Cheers.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:59 a.m. CST

    you know what!

    by cecil1

    While you asswipes are hating on Nolan; why don't we just get Joel Schumacher back on the Batman movies.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1 a.m. CST

    Interesting...

    by The War Against Giygas

    I really was expecting the man to love this film. Kind of crazy to see he didn't. The more I think about it, the more it does seem kind of silly to apply your own film rules to dreams, something that clearly could never have defined rules. But that's the fun thing about movies, I guess. It makes it even worse that Scott Pilgrim did end up being my favorite film of the year so far. Maybe I am a mid 20's, dorky hipster, but that movie just entertained me on so many more levels than Inception. Tom Hardy needs to be in everything though. Literally, everything. Even a contestant on Rock of Love.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:03 a.m. CST

    no sir

    by cecil1

    he didn't explain everything to the audience. That's why people find it chic to hate the movie now; Inception is a movie that sticks with you. I saw it twice, will see again, and fuck everything else this summer

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:03 a.m. CST

    Mr maxwell I find that remark racist...

    by Davidia

    Why must you continue to plunge the otherwise CIVIL AS FUCK talkbacks into degradation with your filth!?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:03 a.m. CST

    " Capone is a late night raider if you know what I mean....

    by conspiracy

    ...So there I was at 10am, a tad sore..."</p><p>I stopped reading right the fuck there. TMI dude...

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:03 a.m. CST

    Where Harry is coming from...

    by Dasinfogod

    <p>Of course, Harry is entitled to his opinion. In fact, because he is so well versed in a variety of cinematic genres and film history, I'll actually put a little more credence in what he has to say over most people who blather on about movies and haven't watch anything more than 10 years old, let alone something silent or in monochrome. That much said...</p> <p>One thing I've notice about Mr. Knowles is that he's primarily a sensualist, not an intellectual. Think of the infamous tears shed at the conclusion of <i>Armageddon</i>, the joyful cries of "MANINSUIT!MANINSUIT!", or the ubiquitous use of the terms "geekgasm" and the insightful "bliss". I'm sure you can cite plenty more, if you think about it.</p> <p><i>Inception</i> at it's core does not telegraph emotions; Dom Cobb is really the only fully fleshed out character in the piece (primarily, I think, because the entire scenario is a construct of his own psyche, but that's best left discussed elsewhere), and his primary motivations are guilt, redemption and, ultimately, reconnection. These are contemplative emotions, and for all the whiz-bang action, it is a largely meditative film, not given to wild and heart-on-sleeve emotive outbursts. It has more in common with Ozu than with Capra, if you get my drift - and may be more pretentious than I give it credit for. Harry referred to it as "boring"; and for an individual wired into emotive diarrhea and cheap sentiment, I can see how he might find it boring on an affective level. The film expert in him recognizes Nolan's skill as a craftsman, but the emotional base can not recognize beyond the surface, and with a narrative that functions on at least five or more surfaces, it may be too much for him to process.</p> <p>Harry, this is not a criticism, just an observation; you may not be emotionally mature enough to comprehend the whole of <i>Inception</i>, but with the changes going on in your life currently, I hope that one day you'll recognize what you missed this time around.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:05 a.m. CST

    its a movie about dreams

    by cecil1

    of course there will be ambiguity.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:06 a.m. CST

    Wow, SmrtGuy82, you're so fierce and tough

    by Kal Reeve

    Picking fights online, mmm mmm mmm. Asking an overweight handicapped man to meet you for a fight, mmm mmm mmm. Wow, Christopher Nolan is quite lucky to have a soldier like you.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:07 a.m. CST

    thank god

    by cecil1

    people on this site are defending the movie. for a second there i was gonna give up on AICN

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:10 a.m. CST

    Conspiracy presents: A Late Night Harry Haiku....

    by conspiracy

    This Summer Nolan is a cheap fuck.</p><p>No Checks, no swag.</p><p>My Piss falls like leaves on Inception.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:12 a.m. CST

    probably not

    by cecil1

    didn't like prestige kiiik, next

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:12 a.m. CST

    HONESTY

    by dmatheny

    Harry, you're taking a lot of heat for this one. I really did love the movie, but I understand your position. The first time I saw it I had a really hard time connecting with the characters on an emotional level. I just didn't care because I was thinking the whole movie was a dream. I also just kept thinking to myself, this is a lot like The Matrix only not revolutionary. But I was sucked into certain scenes and thought they were amazing. The second time I saw it I had a deeper connection with the characters and got a lot more out of it. I think it's a great movie, but I totally understand where you're coming from.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:13 a.m. CST

    A proposition

    by bubstersaddles

    Why don't you wait even a little longer to post reviews, say 2 years. That way people won't even remember the movie to defend it. P.S. This review is shit.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:14 a.m. CST

    dmatheny

    by cecil1

    you hit it on the head. You gotta see it twice

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:14 a.m. CST

    Oh yeah...

    by The War Against Giygas

    I forgot. I love open endings as much as the next person, but fuck. I hate when a movie expects you to invest in characters, only to play around with the idea that they never exsisted in the first place. It's such a lazy way to make your movie seem thought-provoking. I swear I actually did enjoy this movie, though.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:14 a.m. CST

    Harry Knowles is easily manipulated

    by Wvat

    Case in point, The Expendables. Stallone never asked for a favorable review directly, but the celebrity made a brief personal phone call to Harry to see how he was doing. Harry Knowles declares Expendables the best movie of the year.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:14 a.m. CST

    This just in....

    by Grando

    ... Harry's finally lost it.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:16 a.m. CST

    Dasinfogod

    by maxwell's hammer

    I think you're analysis of Harry and how to approach his reviews is pretty astute, but I think anybody dismissing a negative review as 'not getting it' is a bit off the mark. I liked 'Inception', but I can see exactly what Harry means in his criticisms, which I don't think have anything to do with emotional immaturity.<BR> <BR> Yes, there is a lot of exposition. For me, that's a minus 1. For others, like Harry, its a minus 5. The lackluster ski battle was a little ho-hum. For me, that's a minus 2. For Harry, its a minus 8. The lack of inventiveness within the deeper dream levels, especially after the subject knows he's dreaming and a dependence on realism is no longer a functional defense mechanism, is a little disappointing. For me, a minus 2. For Harry, a minus 15.<BR> <BR> We understand the movie. We get it. Harry's problems with the film are not due to emotional immaturity. The film has flaws. For me, they add up to a small little chink in an other wise impressive film. For Harry, those flaws add up to something more, something that detracts to the point of fostering a lukewarm review. I think accusing people who don't like it of 'not getting it' is a little condescending.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:19 a.m. CST

    PRESIDENT BALTAR

    by jimmy_009

    Brevity, dumb fuck. Brevity. You're bashing this and that about a director who has a 1.000 batting average while at the same time you can't even boil down your own thoughts into a well thought out paragraph or less. They teach it in writing 101, apparently you missed it: brevity.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:20 a.m. CST

    superior SHUTTER ISLAND?

    by VinnyMac666

    really? Someone liked that predictable snooze fest?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:22 a.m. CST

    and there you have it friends....

    by Gungan Slayer

    we all wanted him to post his reviews, but some things are best left unknown...Sad, really.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:24 a.m. CST

    Harry where is your INCEPTION review?

    by Tigger Tales

    Someone had to say it!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:24 a.m. CST

    If Harry had any credibility left....

    by Bruce Thomas Wayne

    It's gone. You are officially a dumb fuck.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:24 a.m. CST

    fuck that

    by cecil1

    cinema is art. I luv open endings. That thing inside your cranium does work

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:26 a.m. CST

    Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World is a flop

    by Lashlarue

    Nobody knows what the hell the movies is. Sad really. :(

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:27 a.m. CST

    Ya know you guys are just retarded

    by Double M

    "Oh yeah, I totally agree, this film was terrible." This sucked, Batman Begins and Dark Knight? Oh, they sucked major cock. What the fuck is up to your high and mighty standards anymore? Can you not enjoy anything? My apologies for spewing so much vitriol here, but come on folks. It's OK to like a movie. That's what we are here for right? To BS about shit we like. Fuck, you bitches are depressing.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:28 a.m. CST

    Scott Pilgrim is STILL one of the best movies this year

    by Nerd Rage

    I don't care if only one person sees it, it still rock the house.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:30 a.m. CST

    get off harry

    by cecil1

    he got this one wrong; he's entitled to his opinion. Btw, Inception is a great success. Better than sum shitty ass Expendables.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:33 a.m. CST

    Wyat

    by TheNewDirector

    When did Harry say The Expendable is the best movie of the year? The Expendables is a kickass movie where the last 30 minutes are pure fucking action, I loved it, but still, I think Toy Story 3 is the best of the year and Nolan's best is Insomnia

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:34 a.m. CST

    I'm extremely disappointed Harry

    by batman713

    with your generic cliche Inception beef of "omg it's not dreamy enough". Were you expecting fucking unicorns or some shit? The whole point of how grounded the dreams were was to blur the line between the dreams and reality. Inception wouldn't have been possible if you had extremely dream-like/unrealistic scenarios.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:34 a.m. CST

    Capone and his late night raiding

    by Miyamoto_Musashi

    Scary scary image, will have to store that one for later when I have an erection at work and need to stand up quickly

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:34 a.m. CST

    The Social Network

    by ReportAbuse

    Aaargh ... the damn trailer window keeps popping out on my screen constantly ... and I'm noticing that the lead guy looks way too much like Michael Cera ...

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:35 a.m. CST

    To the nutjobs who wish death on Harry

    by Nerd Rage

    Get a grip. and that goes for people threatening to leave because of the review too.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:37 a.m. CST

    Needed vampires and Werewolves

    by Outlaw

    Blast from the past, I know!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:43 a.m. CST

    cecil1 re Harry

    by Miyamoto_Musashi

    don't think too many of the sensible people care that Harry didn't like the movie, but there is a lot of laughable stuff in his review which ends up making it a joke rather than a fair negative review. <br />D Vader also pointed out that Harry has changed his tune a few times on what delayed the review. I think looking back and when he is in a better place emotionally, health etc Harry will regret this, not necessarily not liking it but the style and his complete lack of professionalism.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:43 a.m. CST

    Sam Worthington is John Matrix

    by catlettuce4

    Didn't the Talkbackers joke about this when they announced a Commando remake? http://www.newsinfilm.com/2010/08/14/commando-remake-attaches-sam-worthington/

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:46 a.m. CST

    Nerd Rage

    by Miyamoto_Musashi

    Anyone wishing literal death on Harry should be completely ignored<br />

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:47 a.m. CST

    so no geeky cooly jizzy awesomeness then?

    by Windowlicker74

    pathetic

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:47 a.m. CST

    question

    by Nerd Rage

    If the Matrix stance on reality is that it's a fabrication of the system and Avatar's stance on reality is that we maybe better off escaping to an alien fantasy world, then what is Inceptions stance?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:49 a.m. CST

    I'm sorry...

    by carraway

    I'm sorry Mr Knowles thatis an incorrect answer, so we must subtract yet another significant portian of your credibility.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:58 a.m. CST

    Odd to find myself agreeing with Headgeek.

    by Keblar

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:01 a.m. CST

    Harry

    by Fing Fang Foom

    Good points on that line from Hardy and the ski sequence. I love me some Gilliam as much as the next guys, and all those tripped out dream movies, BUT some dreams are also more normal. And Parnussus was too much in that regard, ya go numb to the weird visual to the point of almost boredom. Shame on you Terry for the CGI. More smoke!! But c'mon, all movies have flaws, even our favorites. Inception was fantastic! Too bad you didn't feel it. I was totally wanting for Leo to see his kids, and routing for him to come through and felt the pain and love of his wife. Good show!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:02 a.m. CST

    Harry is a Fool. I will never listen to him again.

    by SirGaryColeman

    THe end.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:02 a.m. CST

    You actually have some good points

    by lonewolfmcquade

    here, Harry. And for once not written like some sixteen year old jerking off. But why then didn't you see the awful failure that THE EXPENDABLES is?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:04 a.m. CST

    The Dreams needed to be grounded

    by cgih8r

    because the movie was about not being able to tell the difference between sleep and awake. The audience had to be unsure. Instead of conveying what dreams look like, Nolan is conveying what dreams FEEL like. They feel real and you buy into their reality. It's only when you wake up that you realize...blah blah blah...Get it?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:05 a.m. CST

    I also fell asleep

    by droids22

    It was boring as he'll. I might of like this a bit more had I never seen Dreamscape which I think is a much better movie and certainly more entertaining. A lot of the time you can't even tell they are in a dream until they start talking. So definitely a missed opportunity.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:05 a.m. CST

    Better than a cup of sleepy time.

    by Carl's hat

    Really, I found myself struggling to stay awake through it as well. Good call Harry.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:06 a.m. CST

    Underwhelming, to say the least.

    by The StarWolf

    That I didn't want to disturb the others in my row was the only reason I didn't get up and walk out. Literally. I disliked it that much. First, Nolan makes the silly mistake of telling you "don't believe anything you see or hear. Anything could be a dream" so why bother paying attention? Next, yes, DiCaprio's character was detestable, knowingly putting everybody at risk while pretending otherwise. Then there's Harry's accurate observation that "makes me wonder what the hell these people are doing dreaming up regular firearms." Just like MATRIX where the hero can be anything from superman to Galactus, and all he comes up with is kung fu?! The film's logic doesn't hold up with some laws of physics holding true and others being ignored depending on the needs of the plot. Oh and the ending was telegraphed from light years away. Terrible, simply terrible. Which is a pity given the interesting concept they had to work with. But what can you expect from the director who gave us a Batman movie where they forgot to include the batman?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:11 a.m. CST

    Hey, BP Drill America, don't let this go to your head

    by RandySavage

    but I laughed out loud at your first two comments.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:14 a.m. CST

    agree completely

    by r_kelly

    enjoyed Inception, dozed off the second time I saw it (too little sleep). some cool spectacle, but the dark knight was a lot better on a story level.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:17 a.m. CST

    Somebody didn't get their 'PWESENTS'

    by FrodosBlueBalls

    U have no cred fat man

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:17 a.m. CST

    King Harry Has Fallen

    by GLENNTROPOLIS

    I love this site. I really do. Geeks getting together to talk Geek. Nothing better in the world. And it's great to have a place that is provided by people you absolutely respect and feel no guilt about kicking the ass shit out of their inevitable stupid comments. The low marks you give "Inception", Harry, have finally made me question your reliability. I don't even need to ask the question because I know that you would take "Avatar" over "Inception". And that is really sad. Are you sure you're not Uwe/Ratner/McG fan? If you speak so lowly of "Inception" and so highly of "Avatar", I take pause to wonder.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:23 a.m. CST

    The best thing about AICN: reading & joining in on

    by RandySavage

    the abuse Harry engenders with his inane reviews. His Phantom Menace review is great - a work of unintentional comic genius. Google it if you have read it (i.e., re: Jar Jar, "And guess what... I LOVED HIM!!!") <P>

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:26 a.m. CST

    Harry I love you, but your on fucking crack...

    by SeXX ED

    I'll always come back to this point - you gave a GLOWING review to G.I. JOE - and then this? Really, my man? I just don't know what to say... CRACK!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:33 a.m. CST

    Still think Inception is one of this year's best

    by moviemaniac-7

    At least Nolan gives a damn about the audience's intelligence and doesn't serve some cheap crap that was though up during an exec meeting. Thought Inception was great. A visionary filmmaker in total control of his craft and the movie he was making. WB would be smart to give Nolan a contract like they gave to Kubrick in the 70s. Make movies for us please and we won't harass you with those pesky studio notes. Given the financial success of his past movies for them it should be a smart move on WB's part.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:33 a.m. CST

    Imaginarium made no fucking sense to me,

    by Dennis_Moore

    but it had that amazing doll-headed sex ginger in it, which I liked. Her acting is on the fence, but...

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:33 a.m. CST

    So you didn't liked Inception but loved the Expendables?

    by Koji_Kabuto

    I agree with the "dream bigger" issue, but this movie was original and the narrative so perfectly done, how can you not like this but love "the Expendables"?????!!!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:34 a.m. CST

    One more time, Harry...

    by SeXX ED

    ... FUCKING CRACK COCAINE, dude.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:35 a.m. CST

    I fucking knew it

    by GimpInMyPants

    Harry couldn't let himself shit on a Nolan film. And notice he put the review on the regular news section. That means it'll disappear within a day or two when new items are added. If he had placed it in the review section it'd last a few weeks. Harry, don't worry, some other studio will pay you off. For now, enjoy the Scott Pilgrim money.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:40 a.m. CST

    There are rules in the dreams because the dreams are shared.

    by Stereotypical Evil Archer

    Cobb's team is supposed to make the dreams seem real or at least hyper-real because this will help the actual Inception take hold. Of course more can be done with dreaming, but this was purely a mission of business sabotage. Now take into account how stable things have to be in order for several people to enter into another person dream, the "almost reality" is an interactive requirement otherwise any random happenstance within a dream could cause a "kick" and thereby end the shared dream ability; at least for the one who felt the "kick." Thinking that there should be much more "weird" in a movie about dreams doesn't hold up to contrivances needed for the well thought out plot. It amazes me that people will turn themselves off from a smart movie when it engages the mind in more satisfactory ways.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:42 a.m. CST

    Harry- you just regained my utmost respect

    by AmericanMovieFan

    I thought you were slipping for a minute there, pal. Your reviews had gotten WAY too personal and I felt like any movie you got exclusive interviews/BTS info on, you then sucked its dick in the review. But you've nailed it here. You're 110% correct about Inception, I agree whole heartedly, couldn't have said it better myself. You're off the shitlist, my man.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:43 a.m. CST

    "Dream Bigger" argument misses the point

    by FrodoFraggins

    The entire point of the dreams is to make the target believe they are in a dream. Maybe the trailer played up the special effects too much? This isn't a movie about crazy dream sequences. sigh...<br><br> I think Inception was an incredibly smart movie, but it has definite flaws. The amount of exposition is just too much at times and the film would have been sharper if they could have cut out 20 minutes or so.<br><br> The bias Harry has towards film makers he has a relationship with just gets worse and worse.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:47 a.m. CST

    I NEED A NEW MOVIE NEWS SITE,

    by Citizin_insane

    I'm over aicn, where should I go?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:49 a.m. CST

    After some of the garbage Harry has liked?

    by Charlie_Allnut

    Huh.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 2:57 a.m. CST

    shutter island is superior?

    by JAMF

    you lost me right there, that film was ass. i won't read any more of this review. goodbye.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:02 a.m. CST

    Help for President Balter

    by redkamel

    "take the “limbo” dream-state, in which you are trapped if you happen to “die” in a dream while under sedation. Apparently you get out of limbo by…dying again? How does that make sense? And how does this make limbo a threatening prospect? “Oh no, I have to kill myself TWICE!”…? <p> You get out of limbo by dying, it takes you one dream higher. The problem with limbo is that you dont know that you need to kill yourself. You think it is real. And because you are dreaming within a dream, no one can save you, because you have to get yourself out of limbo first. Thats the problem with limbo: That you don't want to leave, can't leave, and don't realize you can. Thus you lose your grasp on reality and go insane. <p> "Then there is the “kick” that is used to wake someone up from a deeper dream level. In the example at the beginning of the movie, a kick at the upper dream level is sufficient to pull DiCaprio (or “Dom Cobb” as he is known in the movie, which is odd because he doesn’t look Burmese at all) out of the lower dream level. But in the film’s climax sequence, it seems as if a simultaneous kick at the lower dream level is also required for the kick trick to work." <p> Do you mean when they jumped off the building? That was just an easy way to die in Limbo <p> "Even putting aside the fact that the time-dilation between dream levels would make simultaneous kicks INCREDIBLY hard to arrange, this seems like a pointless change of the rules." It wouldn't make it harder because the people in the dreams that occur at a faster speed can exit at a more precise time. Also, the kicks dont have to be simulataneous, just in series, and close enough so you can ride them up. <P> And then there is the issue of “dream powers”. If I can pull a grenade launcher out of nowhere in a dream (as a guy does in one scene), why can’t I fly? Or strike my dream-enemies down with a well-placed meteor? And if Cobb and his wife can age a lifetime in dream-limbo and then restore themselves to full youth right before they lay their heads on the train tracks, why does Saito let himself get old when he’s stuck in limbo? <p> Yeah, so no one EVER exhibited dream powers....its said in the movie that the architecht builds the world etc etc. No one dreamt a grenade launcher, he either asked Ariadne to dream it up for him like all the other weapons. Also, you can't fly because it would alert the subject. Cobb and his wife's appearance is possibly metaphorical, or just for effect; they aren't really old. Saito appears old because he doesn't know hes dreaming, he is just living in limbo unaware. <p>My question is, how does Mal get into all these dreams? If Cobb isnt the architecht, he can't change the world or add stuff. I guess he could just "bring her in with him" kind of?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:04 a.m. CST

    Just watched the Splat Pack documentary

    by Derrida77

    And it's finally proven that Harry knows shit about films. He only cares if he can hang out with his "cool" hipster friends like Eli Roth. Otherwise good documentary though Roth comes across as the biggest tool (think less interesting version of Turtle in Entourage)

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:06 a.m. CST

    Review reads like he didn't even pay attention

    by Guy Who Got A Headache And Accidentally Saves The World

    The third dream, the james bond dream, was Tom Hardy's, not Scarecrow's, and doesnt Harry think it was all a dream at the end? He's a fucking retard who couldn't make sense of a simple heist movie.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:11 a.m. CST

    I agree with Harry on this... not something I say usually

    by JT Kirk

    but this is how I felt about Inception when I walked out of the theater. It wanted to be interesting and smart and exciting, and the premise underwhelmed the promise. There were also too many gimmicks and hooks that required lengthy setup which slowed it down. And the big twists felt telegraphed down the line.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:11 a.m. CST

    its all subjective

    by gomez33

    thats why i love films, its all personal opinion. I liked Inception alot. I thought Expendibles was fucking awful and I watched Pilgrim last night and think its a movie for 16 year olds or people who don't have sex. Its really quite retarded, well made but retarded none the less.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:13 a.m. CST

    AGREED - WAS LIKE WATCHIN A REPEAT OF BOND/MATRIX

    by tazzzer

    Seen it all b4 shame really could have been amazing had they given us somthin new to imagine. Harry well done with this review spot on!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:16 a.m. CST

    Citizin_insane, AICN isn't about the editorials...

    by GimpInMyPants

    ...it's about the talkbacks. We make AICN awesome.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:22 a.m. CST

    100% agree harry

    by spider_neil

    inception = hugely overrated

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:23 a.m. CST

    Totally agree!

    by TheSeeker

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:23 a.m. CST

    Dark Knight is not the masterpiece so many Nolan fans claim it i

    by Kal Reeve

    When Batman is the weakest part of a Batman movie, there's a problem.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:25 a.m. CST

    I absolutely adore INCEPTION

    by lv_426

    Best damn film I've seen in ages. And I'm no rabid Nolan fanboy. I liked BB and Dark Knight, as well as his other films besides Insomnia, but wasn't drooling and doing cartwheels into the Grand Canyon over The Dark Knight like some where two summers ago.<P>Anyways, I do agree with one point that Harry made. Basically that the stakes could've been raised a bit more if the idea at the center of the inception that Cobb and crew were trying to implement was something like stopping a major war from happening in place of getting a guy to dissolve a company. It would've ratcheted things up a bit more. Still though, that's a minor nitpick for me. The film was top notch.<P>As for the snow fortress sequence, I liked it. Not every action sequence in a film has to be something mind-blowingly new. Remember folks, movies are still about telling a story, not R&D for who can make the craziest action set piece.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:32 a.m. CST

    Fat Guy Prefers Freddy 3 to INCEPTION. nuff said.

    by Frye777

    Knowles you are a pathetic big disgusting tasteless manchild. Leave the smart movies alone. they are not your turf. go back to blow EXPANDABLES.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:38 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    "It's not what *I* wanted it to be" Harry's review.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:38 a.m. CST

    I'M SO SAD FOR YOU HARRY

    by RpgSama

    I am, FOR ME, this is one of the best, if not the best movie of the last 5 to 10 years, like i said, FOR ME, maybe it is overrated, but that doesn't make it bad, i don't know how can anyone say with a straight face that Inception sucks, it just doesn't maybe is not a 11 out of 10, but it must at least be a 7 out of 10, we complain about getting remakes of remakes, reimaginings, sequels and when a movie like this comes out, that is at least partially original once it gets some recognition it's cool to bash it, go fuck yourself Harry, i say it from Venezuela, you're just a disgrace, at least do a real review, and base yourself not in what you wanted out of every movie about dreams, the fantastical, but review what you saw, with the rules it was explained to you. By the way, just because you are in a dream it doesn't mean you are supossed to have super powers, i have had strange dreams, stuff out of something like Robotech, but 99 out of 100 dreams are about mundane stuff based on reality. Fuck yourself Harry, you're a sad little person who doesn't deserve any respect.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:42 a.m. CST

    Mr. Knowles I am totally with you!

    by NeverTalksBack

    I rarely, rarely disagree with Harry. I'm not sucking up, why would it matter, is he gonna send me some free DVDs? :p So as usual I'm totally with you Harry. Inception just didn't do it for me either. I don't think it was a bad film, visually it was gorgeous. The zero gravity scene was amazing. The actors were great but I just never felt that invested in the characters and what they were trying to do. Totally agree too that dreams tend to be crazier than presented in this movie, it was too grounded in reality. I think Nolan is a great director, but this was my least favorite film of his. Just my 2 cents

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:43 a.m. CST

    Fair play, Harry. Sounds a bit like your Last Action Hero issue

    by Mr Nicholas

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:45 a.m. CST

    Conjuring does not exist in this dojo

    by Cobra--Kai

    Anyone please clarify...<p> Does Tom Hardy 'conjure' a gun out of thin air or not?<p> That seems to be the 'loose thread that unravelled the whole movie' for poor befuddled Harry. But I don't think he did make a gun appear on the fly. I thought it was just one of several guns that the architect or whomever had 'placed' in the dream for their use. We never see an item appear in the dream world, and as far as we, the audience, know the big gun Hardy wields is one that was already there?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:47 a.m. CST

    It works if you see it as just a heist movie

    by Tacom

    In a heist movie, the stakes are never that big, like saving the world. It's about if they get the job done and if the people doing it don't get killed. On that level I think it works.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:49 a.m. CST

    inception is 7/10

    by monster man

    id give it 7/10 , ellen page is a great actress but this was the wrong part for her. i enjoyed the film but they needed to explain more about the dream machine for me to believe in it , just a bit more back story would of helped. i will have to watch it again maybe to understand some of the story , like harry says its just a bit boring at times which is sad because theres an amazing film in there somewhere.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:50 a.m. CST

    All other considerations aside

    by Gwai Lo

    If you think DREAMSCAPE is a better movie than INCEPTION you may have a rutabaga in the place where your brain should be

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:51 a.m. CST

    I'm sorry but a movie with no character development

    by spider_neil

    isn't a good movie. if there is no character development you wont care about the characters and if you don't care about the characters action sequences are pointless as you wont care who lives or dies. honestly, inception is nolan's worst movie.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:53 a.m. CST

    Emotion does not exist in this dojo

    by Cobra--Kai

    I'd also say that I found INCEPTION to be very powerful emotionally.<p> The final ten minutes with Cillian opening his vault and seeing his father... Leo releasing himself from his wife... to the moment where his children's heads turn to see him.<p> I'm man enough to admit that I was choked up big time throughout the finale.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:57 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    spider_neil, Nolan's started to be compared to Kubrick in some quarters.<p> And that fits in with your question about character development, because... where's the character development in 2001?<p> 2001, considered one of the greatest films ever made. Far more character development in INCEPTION than in 2001. (in particular Cillian Murphy's epiphany in the vault and Cobb letting go of his past).

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 3:58 a.m. CST

    About that iPad..

    by AzzyAzzy

    ..just kidding, good review. I agree with almost all of it. And just kidding about the just kidding1. Fuck your iPad and your considering having one front page news. Change the website to "Aint it cool news and harry's personal life blog and a place where the forum trolls are fucking furious oh and now we have gigantic advertisements on our front page .com".

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:02 a.m. CST

    Harrys and others feeling underwhelmed

    by judge dredds fresh undies

    by Inception just illustrates the problem with going into films with preconceptions of what YOU want the film to be.<br><br> Inception is so vastly superior to any other 'event' film, this is the reason people have been bitching so much about the lack of Harry's review. This is the Blade Runner of our time, I cant believe people dare stoop to compare it to the Matrix.<br><br> For the record I thought the action was the weakest part of the film (aside from the zero g fight) and I hope Nolan becomes more consistent in that area. But the film worked so fantastically on every other level I could forgive some of the bland action.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:03 a.m. CST

    I felt the emotions too Cobra--Kai

    by lv_426

    I think that is what adds some weight and resonance to the inception about the dissolving of the company, mainly because Fisher goes through a catharsis and comes to some conclusion on his father's death, even if it was all a subliminal con job from his perspective.<P>It is interesting that both Fisher and Cobb go through major cathartic and psychological transformations, whilst one knows it on both a conscious and subconscious level, and the other strictly on a subconscious level. In a sense, there were two inceptions in the film. One for Fischer and one for Cobb.<P>I don't understand where those people harshly criticizing Inception are getting the notion that this film was cold and calculating. Sure it was put together with clockwork precision on a structural level, but it also had a very powerful emotional core and resolution to it.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:05 a.m. CST

    Cobra--Kai

    by spider_neil

    I don't like 2001 either, I think that spartacus is a better movie because it has a stronger story with developed characters. first and foremost a movie should be about the story and complex characters. memento doesn't have a fraction of inceptions budget but is a far superior movie for reasons I just listed.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:06 a.m. CST

    People need to stop saying "I'm sorry but..."

    by GimpInMyPants

    You're not sorry, asshole!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:09 a.m. CST

    Go Harry!!! You're Right On the Money!!!!

    by Media Messiah

    Did we really need 4 levels of dreams in this movie? They could have stopped with a dream within a dream, but...4??? Inception just got too involved, and there was no sense of fun, or wonder, and the James Bond sequence was ridiculous. It played like Nolan's audition reel to direct a Bond film. <BR><BR>Really, Inception is just an overdone rip-off of far superior films that came before it, from Dreamscape, Dark City, and The Matrix, to The Thirteenth Floor, and The Cell. Shuffle those films together in any combination you like, and you have Inception. Nolan either should have remade Dreamscape, or Altered States, the latter, another great film, and called it a day--instead of throwing together a bunch of heady science fiction concepts that he doesn't fully understand, intellectually so, beyond the visual aspects. Nolan got lost in the technology of it all, and trying to overly explain that technology, as well as seemingly endless action scenes--scenes with no villain to fuel them(?), instead of focusing on the drama, and proper character development, which is necessary above all, to a film and story, therein.<BR><BR>You can bet that Inception was created between Nolan as spurred on by a Warner Brother's executive who told him, "Hey, The Wachowski Siblings screwed-up The Matrix franchise, and they are weirdos anyway, so we would like you to create something that takes the best elements from The Matrix, and turn it into a new possible franchise for us, absent Joel Silver and the Wachowskis." This wasn't a film born from the heart, it was born of greed. BTW, previously, Warner employed the Wachowskis and Joel Silver to rip-off Dark City, a film...produced by Warner's subsidiary, New-Line Cinema.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:12 a.m. CST

    LMAO

    by Bob_Dole

    If nothing else you people are hilarious...

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:13 a.m. CST

    INCEPTION, THE MATRIX, & AVATAR

    by lv_426

    All deal with dreams/what is reality? on some level. Yet each film is aesthetically different (of course Matrix and Inception are closer in this regard), as well as thematically different.<P>Inception is about letting go, not living with regret<P>The Matrix is about finding the real and believing in yourself (faith)<P>Avatar was about embracing the dream world over the mundane reality and fighting for logic against a certain type of madness, which was corporate greed and callousness in this case (Jake deciding to fight with and stay on Pandora as a Na'vi)

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:16 a.m. CST

    The best way to describe Inception...

    by Arbifax

    A movie that is complex for the sake of being complex. This is a movie that says nothing about anything remotely relevant. Its a movie whose complexity is utterly meaningless and exists solely to muck up the narrative in unnecessary ways. Its a movie that continually stumbles through its interminable exposition, which half the time is nearly inaudible due to the woeful sound mixing and omnipresent score. Inception is the movie that fans of Nolan want us to believe is the return of Intelligent and daring blockbuster filmmaking. But in reality, it is utterly empty, and worst of all, lacking in imagination. But hey, JGL looks nice in a suit, and that Zero G fight was kind of cool I guess.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:17 a.m. CST

    Media Messiah: your conspiracy theories are full of holes

    by lv_426

    Research the production history of Inception to see that it was not done out of greed.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:24 a.m. CST

    Speaking of dream films, anyone here seen Kurosawa's DREAMS?

    by lv_426

    It is a completely different approach than Inception took, but a totally awesome film nonetheless. Check it out if you haven't seen it and are itching for some nice cinematic dream imagery.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:27 a.m. CST

    Never taking = Never got a Set Visit

    by Harry_Knowles_Fell_Asleep_During_Inception

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:28 a.m. CST

    LV_426: Nolan Is On Record As Saying He Stole Inception

    by Media Messiah

    Nolan, in an interview, said he stole the idea for Inception, but he didn't know where??? Further, before that, in another article, it was strongly implied that he acknowleged having been inspired by Dark City, The Matrix, and The Thirteenth Floor.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:29 a.m. CST

    the issue.

    by jimmiescoffee

    how can any sane person slobber over a film like expendables (which can be enjoyed. not admired or thoughtfully discussed) and neglect one of the most respected movies in years. its fucking #3 all time on IMDB with 150,000 votes. thats no fluke.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:29 a.m. CST

    Serioulsy

    by Harry_Knowles_Fell_Asleep_During_Inception

    Everyone should have fucking stopped reading at "I fell asleep"..lol..jesus fatman..you have one fucking job to do..REVIEW MOVIES.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:30 a.m. CST

    Invalid Criticism, frankly

    by pzadvance

    Don't have the time to see if somebody already mentioned this, I hope they have. But here we go. I really liked Inception. It was a breath of fresh air for me, it slapped me awake and I was suddenly brutally aware and furious about how low Hollywood has sunk in recent years. This film sucked me in like I haven't been sucked in a long while (yeah, yeah). But I'm not one of those fanboys who will attack or reduce the opinion of anyone who badmouths this movie. If what you saw in that film didn't do it for you, good on you. Sorry you didn't get your money's worth, but your opinion is 100% valid. Here's what I think is invalid: this criticism that can essentially be boiled down to "I don't dream like that." "In MY dreams I can fly." "In MY dreams every woman walks around naked with perfect fucking tits." "In MY dreams my beagle can turn into a gun-toting bionic dragon on a whim." Well, fuck you. Go to sleep and bask in your own self-indulgent dreams. We're here at this movie to see Chris Nolan's dream world. Not surreal enough for you? Doesn't stack up to how you THINK dreams should be portrayed? I don't give a flying fuck. You didn't touch this movie. You have no say in how this world is presented. What this specific criticism ultimately boils down to is a disconnect between your expectations of what a film about dreams should have been about and what Nolan actually chose to make it about. A valid criticism of a film is an analysis of what occurs within the actual timespan of the film. An analysis of what the film IS. "The pacing doesn't work, this performance is good, this relationship isn't fully fleshed out, there's too much exposition." Totally valid. But complaining about what the movie ISN'T? That's bullshit. That says zip. It adds absolutely nothing to the discussion of this work. "I would've made the dreams more surreal." Well congratulations buddy, but you didn't. This wasn't your film. This is the work of an artist, love him or hate him, and this is the world he created. Deal with it. So Harry, learn how to a.) write, b.) edit, and c.) analyze a film on its own merits and not hold it to some absurd conceptual standard that doesn't truly exist.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:31 a.m. CST

    Thankyou Harry

    by mastes360

    You are 100% right, the film is a goo solid 8/10 film and nothing more, nothing less. The Nolan Disciples need to accept that Nolan isn't god and that the film was good and thats that, The Matrix did it far better.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:33 a.m. CST

    Funny how Harry managed to stay awake for all of Phantom Menace

    by Harry_Knowles_Fell_Asleep_During_Inception

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:34 a.m. CST

    the expendables

    by jimmiescoffee

    the more i reflect on it. its a fairly embarrassing piece of work.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:34 a.m. CST

    Spoilers

    by veteran_of_mu

    I don't mind spoilers. Really, I don't. I mind the fact that Harry doesn't label the review with "Warning, Spoilers". And that includes that review of the expendables that read like the noises someone makes while they're being fisted. I might have liked the expendables - but now I can't watch it without thinking of Harry's prostate. Thanks for that. So what's an AICN reader to do when the guy that runs the joint fails to observe the most basic ethic of a critic? Swear off reading him. I mean, sure, he's an interesting character. And he's had the foresight and grit to make a fine site. But if I can't read his reviews without getting these fine flicks spoiled, then I'm not going to read his reviews any more. I'll read the other guys here - most of them seem to actually still have a clue.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:34 a.m. CST

    OBVIOUSLY

    by banananutz71

    Harry not liking the flick is his way of combating the people that bitched at him for not reviewing it for 3 weeks. This movie isn't for everyone, but Harry is the type of guy that would be moved by atleast part of it. This review is a weak defense and nothing else. Fuck the expendables, Harry, you're in Limbo.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:34 a.m. CST

    Harry's Totem would be a big silver cock

    by Joh Doe

    Well done Harry. Here's an incredibly ambitious film that, depending on box office outcome, could encourage studio suits to invest in big, original ideas, rather than churning out remakes of horror films (whether they're: "effin' awesome & creepy as all fuck!" - Harry Knowles, Nightmare on Elm Street Remake review and maybe they're 'the dreams of executives'). BUT we should all go and see The Expendables instead, because your mate directed it and because the action sequences in Inception just aren't up to scratch. Bollocks. You, darling, need to dream a bit bigger, rather than relying on the bits-in-the-film-where-things-blow-up- and-you-don't-go-to-the-toilet to keep you hooked. You stay at home and watch Transformers 2 and I'll go and see Inception for the 3rd time, without falling asleep.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:39 a.m. CST

    RE:

    by jimmiescoffee

    "depending on box office outcome, could encourage studio suits to invest in big, original ideas, rather than churning out remakes of horror films" damn good point. and i think the numbers are in.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:46 a.m. CST

    SCOTTPILGRIMFAN, you say you are never wrong...

    by DrRumpledink

    but you were wrong about scott pilgrim owning the box office and the world. It'ss all you talk about. You have nothing left. You are just reapting yourself like sad idiot. So what's the point in you now?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:51 a.m. CST

    scott pilgrim is just fine being what it is

    by jimmiescoffee

    its a lesson in repetition and its way to offbeat for most (for all the wrong reasons). it fits nicely between art like INCEPTION and semi entertaining garbage like THE EXPENDABLES

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:51 a.m. CST

    *repeating

    by DrRumpledink

    as for inception. I've yet to see it. seems to be spiliting folks down the middle here. Nolan has not made a movie I don't like yet. Suprised Harry didn't dig it. Be interested to see his opinion after repeat viewings.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 4:58 a.m. CST

    Wouldn't have worked Harry

    by Dromosus

    The only way for the Russian Doll structure of the dream sequences to have worked was to make the dream sequences simple, otherwise the plot holes would have yawned open and no-one would have been able to follow what was already a convoluted plot. If a van falling off a bridge has such a massive effect on the next layer, what would a Salvador Dali melting clocks world of absurdity do?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5 a.m. CST

    But Seriously

    by AceofFreebase

    Avatar sucked

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5:06 a.m. CST

    Harry LOVED GI JOE

    by evilnik

    and enjoyed twilight 3. remember that!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5:08 a.m. CST

    "Scorsese's vastly superior SHUTTER ISLAND"

    by Grimcicle

    So a bland, dull and predictable "thriller" is your idea of "vastly superior?" What the fuck is wrong with you, Harry?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5:20 a.m. CST

    Yeah, and Harry also liked Kick-Ass

    by Stalkeye

    To the extent of going against Ebert while defending said underatted film.IMO he gets points for that alone.Can't co-sign (agree) on Twilight or GI Joe however.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5:22 a.m. CST

    how anyone can give a movie a 'pass' with no character developme

    by spider_neil

    is beyond me. where was JGL backstory? or hardy's? give me a break, how are you supposed to care about a character if you can't see what motivates them, and what is the point of a charater journey if that character isn't changed at the end of the movie. definately the emperor's new clothes with this new movie.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5:24 a.m. CST

    Shutter Island

    by Joh Doe

    It's funny, the argument here is: I loved Inception VS I quite liked Inception. I think anyone that HATED it is thick, or trying too hard to go against the grain. The real argument is: Is Harry wrong? And the answer is YES.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5:32 a.m. CST

    Harry Just Can't Win, Can He?

    by Goldfingah

    He trots out a bunch of positive reviews and he's a whore, a moron, etc. who never gives negative reviews. He doesn't join the ongoing wankfest for "Inception" among Nolan fanboys and he's a whore, a moron, etc. I don't even like all of his reviews but considering that he's going against the grain against a movie that was well received by critics and audiences, I think one can assume he's being pretty honest with how he feels about it. I liked the movie quite a bit, but I had issues with it, especially all of the extra exposition. I can see where Harry's coming from, even if I don't agree with all of his points. So Harry didn't like it. People bugged the shit out of him for an "Inception" review, and now that he's given it they're crucifying him for it because he didn't fellate Nolan the way everyone was expecting him to, the way they had thesmelves. How typical of the TB. It's HIS opinion, for Chrissakes. He didn't find the film that imaginative. That's all he's saying with his "dream bigger darling" comment. No need to rip him a new one because he dreams differently from Nolan or because he feels differently about the film from those who liked it. I couldn't give a shit if he liked "Expendables" (which I don't even intend to see); people like what they like and if YOU don't like what he had to say, why was it so important to so damned many of you that he review this movie at all? The subtext I'm getting here is: "Harry is a whore, moron, etc. unless he agrees not only with the fact that I like/dislike this movie, but unless he also likes/dislikes it for exactly the same reasons I do." Wow. Plus, this accusation that the people who didn't like the movie are those who "didn't get it" is just getting really old. It's unduly defensive and quite frankly childish. I bet you someone with a double PhD in psychology and architecture could come along and write a disseration on why he didn't like "Inception" and you tools would still insist that he "didn't get it" for the simple reason that he didn't agree with you. Oh, and Harry DESPISED "Transformers 2." It was pretty clear, so if you're going to take cheap shots at him at least verify which brainless action movies he liked and which ones he didn't.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5:37 a.m. CST

    but could someone with a PHD

    by Seph_J

    come along as write a dissertation on why The Expendables is a better film than Inception? <p> Like to read that.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5:37 a.m. CST

    but could someone with a PHD

    by Seph_J

    come along as write a dissertation on why The Expendables is a better film than Inception? <p> Like to read that.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5:39 a.m. CST

    Goldfingah

    by Seph_J

    You don't need to be a 'Nolan faboy' to like Inception. <p> You just need to be awake.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5:39 a.m. CST

    Another reason why...

    by BennyL

    ... I no longer place any credibility in your reviews, Harry. You go from practically fist fucking yourself with sheer elation over the extremely disappointing Expendables, to falling asleep in what I consider to be one of the top 3 films of 2010. Dude, you need to change your meds.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5:43 a.m. CST

    BETTER TO REMAIN SILENT AND BE THOUGHT A FOOL......

    by ChristianTerroristMilitia

    THEN TO SPEAK OUT AND REMOVE ALL DOUBT. Words to live by Knowles....words to live by.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5:45 a.m. CST

    Seph_J

    by mastes360

    Inception is a better film than The Expendables in the sense of Inception would win more awards and be more criticly acclaimed but i certainly enjoyed The Expendables far more.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5:48 a.m. CST

    Sounds like it should have been a Cronenberg

    by CarmillaVonDoom

    Bet I'm the only person posting in this talkback that hasn't seen the movie yet!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5:54 a.m. CST

    Harry love

    by Joh Doe

    Woah! Surely this is the whole point of Talk Back? I'm sure Harry can take it, you don't need to defend him. Or maybe he doesn't give a shit. I'm surprised by his review, that's all. This just goes to show that people listen to, and care about his opinion and in this case I think his review is quite destructive.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5:58 a.m. CST

    Inception good (maybe great), not Nolan's best...

    by SoupBack

    I have seen it twice, and I did like it better the second time. Having said that, it is definitely not my favorite Nolan film. Memento > The Dark Knight > The Prestige > Following > Batman Begins > Inception > Insomnia

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 5:59 a.m. CST

    What a joke

    by cool_britannia79

    Harry, you're clearly on the payroll for a select few movies at a time mate, Inception fucking owns this summer, it's generating more debate than any other film I care to remember. Kudos for setting AICN up, but it's time to step away, every single thing you post is just damaging this sites credibility now. Admitting you fell asleep during the biggest film of the year, or had to pee during the most anticipated scene in action movie history, is enough rope to hang your fat ass with in my book.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6 a.m. CST

    This is a travesty

    by OptimusCrime

    Well, Inception sucked, but Expendables was an action lubed, spicy sausage mangasm (or whatever stupid shit he said about that movie). Ugh, I know we have all said it before, but I really am finished with the reviews of the Red-Haired Port-o-Potty this time.<P>It is fine to dislike Inception, but not when...oh, what's the point? Pathetic work, Knowles.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6 a.m. CST

    Harry just confirmed what I always knew...

    by syn_flood

    He knows nothing about filmmaking.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6 a.m. CST

    Harry? Did Nolan Trash Your Lights??

    by Harry_Where_Is_Your_Inception_Review

    ROFLCOPTER!!!!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:13 a.m. CST

    HARRY KNOWLES - THE FORREST GUMP OF WEBMASTERS....

    by ChristianTerroristMilitia

    A fucking simpleton who has gotten through life on luck and no real effort apart from rolling over every few hours to have antibiotics administered to his bedsores. "EAT HARRY EAT!!!"..."NOM NOM NOM"!!!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:17 a.m. CST

    Yep. Totally agree with Harold.

    by speed

    I would add the chick from Juno is just awful and should never have been in the flick with the calibre of actors around her. But like Harry said, in the end I just simply didn't care. Matrix and Blade Runner it certainly aint.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:22 a.m. CST

    And another thing

    by speed

    The best sequence was when the Heath Ledger lookalike (Gordon Levitt Jr) was fighting in the hallway. The concept of the movie was awesome, the execution pretty average.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:22 a.m. CST

    Fuck you, Knowles.

    by OptimusCrime

    Ugh, I just wrote a lengthy missive about how much you suck, but I deleted it when I realized that I'd be even more pathetic than you had I posted it. It was not appropriate, but neither was this worthless excuse for film criticism.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:24 a.m. CST

    by centilope

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:25 a.m. CST

    What the fuck, Harry

    by centilope

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:28 a.m. CST

    And you know what...

    by speed

    I reckon Scarlett Johannsson's breast milk probably tastes better than most. Just saying...

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:29 a.m. CST

    Seph_J "A nolan faboy?"

    by Goldfingah

    ...talk about being awake... ...though to be fair I typed "thesmelves" in my original comment (and possibly other typos I haven't discovered yet) so we all screw up every now and then. My point is perfectly intelligent, discerning people can watch "Inception" and not be blown away by it. Hard as it may be to believe, many of them actually pop up here and there on the TBs. Many of you obviously wanted Harry to like this movie, and had he liked it I'm sure he would have obliged you all with another of his hyper-nostalgic, self-indulgent, grammatically challenged love-fests. I mean, I sure as shit didn't have to know that he cried in the fucking men's urinal while he expressed his love for the first "Spider-Man" movie, but he threw it right in there, and he probably would have done something similar had he loved this film. I'm pretty sure you're all glad he spared you that (or at least you should be). But he didn't like it. It's fine to feel disappointed, but the attacks that have been leveled against this guy, while actually tame by TB standards, are pretty annoying considering how many people wanted Harry to weigh in on this film.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:29 a.m. CST

    So Harry hates Inception because...

    by onezeroone

    it didn't do the things way Harry wanted it to? I think he would have preferred if each level in dream was a different genre [Film Noir, Fantasy, Horror, Si-fi] or something. Am sure that would have perfectly fit the dreams of all the corporate types.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:30 a.m. CST

    LOOK, THE POINT ISN'T ABOUT HARRY'S REVIEW.....

    by ChristianTerroristMilitia

    It's that, for some reason, he didn't put out a review for one of the biggest movies of the year. I myself didn't think Inception was all that great, very good, yes, but not the masterpiece that people were claiming. Having said that, there was no reasonable explanation for Knowles not to put out a review of this flick even if his feeble brain couldn't comprehend what was going on. He’s the fucking OWNER of this goddamn site and it looks like he can’t be bothered to review anything unless he’s getting comped (Scott Pilgrim), getting attention from the film crew (The Expendables) or is on bad terms with the Director (Transformers 2). His indifference to Inception feels like there is something more going on. I suspect it’s because the studio didn’t cater to his demands for pwesants, freebies or a free screening. If he saw it and didn’t like it then I can respect that position, but with Knowles I just know something is up because he’s soo corrupt.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:30 a.m. CST

    Cat's among the pigeons now...

    by Lemure_v2

    Why didn't they dream up bigger guns? Harry was definitely not paying attention. And if it's now "hip" to dislike TDK and Inception, then I am going to be totally un-hip!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:33 a.m. CST

    You crazy?

    by centilope

    I'm speechless. Hand over your man or your geek card or both. You can't be serious. Stay off the drugs kids, or this is what'll happen to you.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:33 a.m. CST

    And let us not forget...

    by Lemure_v2

    Harry is only one guy. His opinion is his own. He's not some kind of movie-god who's word is the final one. So, he didn't like (understand) Inception. Millions did.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:36 a.m. CST

    damn it

    by OptimusCrime

    I just smoked a cigarette, and became sad as I did so. We are eviscerating a guy who has created an internet community that we all enjoy, and who has no hope of anything resembling a normal life. He can't get up from his wheelchair, and is physically incapable of satisfying his "wife". He uses sexual commentary all the time, but has he ever actually had intercourse?<P> There is a very good chance that he has not. He is morbidly obese and may not live long. Sorry for the harsh words, Harry. Really. What difference does it make how you feel about a movie? (Jesus, even my apology sounds mean).

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:37 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    "Of course - maybe these are the dreams of executives. In which case, I'll choose the dreams of artists. Every time." <p> HARRY KNOWLES - the one critic on Planet Earth who unreservedly loved the NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET remake corporate cash-in.<p> Hypocrisy in action. Kerrching.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:39 a.m. CST

    OptimusCrime is a nice chap

    by Seph_J

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:41 a.m. CST

    OptimusCrime, NO, HARRY HAS NEVER HAD INTERCOURSE BECAUSE......

    by ChristianTerroristMilitia

    The last person who put their hand under his rolls of fat drew back a bloody stump. This is why he's always telling us about his "girlfriends" and using sexual metaphors for everything.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:43 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    OptimusCrime, yes a nice chap but also a 'foolish earthling hurling himself into the void' - this is aicn dude, celebrating movies we like and ripping apart ones we don't is what goes on here.<p> The flaming is just collateral damage, in truth it's rarely personal.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:44 a.m. CST

    About the dream sequences

    by centilope

    THey where supposed to look real so the subject doesn't know he's getting screwed over. If he thinks it's real he's more willing to give up the information. Creating too trippy, crazy unrealistic shit in the subject's mind switches on the mind's natural defense system. It was explained in the movie.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:46 a.m. CST

    YOU LIKED THE NIGHTMARE REMAKE? FUCK YOU KNOWLES!!!

    by ChristianTerroristMilitia

    I REFUSE to ever watch that piece of shit because Michael Fucking Bay's shithole of a company Produced it and they couldn't even make a good Friday the 13th movie for fuck sakes.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:47 a.m. CST

    centilope

    by Seph_J

    but Harry was asleep in that bit. He fell asleep dreaming of what the wachowski's would have done with the material. And because he found it so tedious the second time he saw it, the film is therefore crap...

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:47 a.m. CST

    100% agree

    by catlettuce4

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:49 a.m. CST

    Harry is right. Inception SUCKED

    by Ringwearer9

    You know, there's more to making a good movie than fiddly little bullshit about dreams-within-dreams, and, as Harry said, what kind of discussion you can have ABOUT the movie at the diner afterwards. Is the movie well made? Does it involve you? do you care about the characters? Inception failed on all those levels, ESPECIALLY the part about getting to know the characters and care about what happens to them. And for those of you claiming that this is intentional, because everyone is just a figment of Cobbe's imagination, so of course they aren't fleshed out characters ... that's not really dream-like ... people in real dreams tend to be quite vivid. Nolan failed to make a truly compelling film. So why is it so popular? 1. Dark Knight spillover ... that was the event movie of a previous year, and people were desperate for SOMETHING this summber 2. The "Emmperor has no clothes" effect ... where people who have seen it but don't like it are afraid to say so for being labeled too dumb to "get it". There wasn't much to get, the film explained it ad nauseum. What the film failed to do was make us care about wht it had explained, or clearly, visually, underline the exact details, or why we should care. On the snow level, did any of you manage to keep track of who was punching who in any scene, faceless snowsuited people punching others? That's a perfect example of what's wrong with this movie ... I could intellectually understand that it was our heroes fighting mental defenses, but the film poorly conveyed which was which, and why I should care. And as the film went on we went into different people's subconsciouses, but whose subconscious it was in didn't particularly matter much. Mal's suicide scene was the only moment of real power in the whole movie. That's not enough to call a movie "genius" on. It takes EFFORT to make a movie involving, easy to follow. When Nolan fanboys yell at people for being too stupid to "get it" they are damning Nolan for being such an inept film-maker that he failed to convey his story effectively.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:53 a.m. CST

    Harry doesnt get it

    by DioxholsterReturns

    he want Matrix Revolution not Matrix no.1.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:53 a.m. CST

    In addition, I PREDICT

    by Ringwearer9

    That this is the last gasp for Nolan as a filmmaker of non-Batman films. People may be curious about this film, and have fun with the "Is it a dream or not" gimmick, but the next time they see Nolan's name on a non-Batman film, their instinct will be to ask "What else is playing?" because, like Harry, they just didn't have much fun at this. And I agree with Harry, as awful as "Shutter Island" was, it was way more memorable and effective than this piece of shit.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 6:56 a.m. CST

    Inception was basically a Star Trek episode

    by WickedJacob

    That's not a slam or a praise. It just is.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:03 a.m. CST

    The Expendables>Inception=Fat Idiot

    by captaincrazy

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:06 a.m. CST

    LOL!

    by SunTzu77

    Harry didn't really like "Inception" but he loved the "Nightmare on Elm Street" remake that was absolutely horrible. Elm Street has a 13% fresh rating for a reason.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:07 a.m. CST

    ChristianTerroristMilitia

    by centilope

    All this talk about Inception, which is still surprisingly positive and civilized is hurting Pilgrim and the Expendables. Almost nobody is talking about those movies. It's all Inception this, Inception that. That can't be good for the box office returns of those movies. Inception is stealing the thunder Harry wanted those movies to have because of his attachment to the filmmakers, his friends. I can understand that, if were in his position I can't say for sure I wouldn't have done the same, even if it meant flushing down my reputation down the toilet and pissing some group of people off. Harry is not doing this get some cock or some presents or anything like that. He's taking one for the team again because he genuinely feels it's the right thing to do. I think we could all cut him some slack.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:09 a.m. CST

    Also, about the ending

    by centilope

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:12 a.m. CST

    "Of course, maybe these are the dreams of exectives"!!!!!!

    by donchild

    This line floors me!! Is Harry suggesting that Inception is another empty summer studio flick? does he prefer the dreams of artists like Sommers and Bay??? Inception is wildly imaginitive in its plotiing, its complexity and ideas, it has one of the best endings in any movie I've ever seen, not becuase it says it was all just a dream but because it gives the audience something to go back and re evaluate on multiple repeat viewings (how many summer pop corn flicks ever manage to do that?). Making the dreams more surreal doesn't necessarily make the film any better, in fact in this particular movie it would have been severely out of place in what is essentially a heist flick that happens to be set within the mind, so to draw comparisons with Dr Paranuss is like complaining about TDK not having enough of the Schumacher day glo or Burtonesque gothic imagery in there. Harry I've always been strangly amused at how you could attribute imaginary qualities to movies like IM2, Van Helsing, Spiderman 3 and so on but yet when a genuinely terrifically written, acted, scored & directed movie such as Inception comes along you seem to do the reverse and instead ascribe imagined negative qualities while disregarding its obvious merits.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:15 a.m. CST

    by centilope

    The totem spins perfectly if it's a dream, it wobbled at the end, you didn't have to see it drop for the end to be real.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:16 a.m. CST

    Inception is this years Avatar.

    by BurnedNotice_Dude

    Both are overrated.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:20 a.m. CST

    YOU KNOW THEY WERE WORKING IN THE SUBCONCIOUS RIGHT?

    by ChristianTerroristMilitia

    Understand that what they were doing was planting an idea within a person’s SUBCONSCIOUS. They couldn’t just walk up to him in the dream and say “hi, yeah, give up your Fathers company”. They had to plant the concept by creating an emotional catharsis so that the idea would take root in Fischers subconscious, thus, making it feel like an organic idea of his own. In the first level, Fischer thinks he’s awake and they try to plant the idea in his mind that his Father truly loved him by having Tom Hardy pretend that he was Tom Berenger. This didn’t work because they learned that A: the relationship between Fscher and his Father was worse then the team thought and B: Fischer’s mind had been trained to defend against extraction/inception.<br> <br>So, this is the reason why they take him in the van and put him under so that they could proceed to level 2 where DiCaprio pretends that Level 1 is real and cons Fischer’s SOBCONSCIOUS into believing that Berenger was betraying Fischer so that he wouldn’t destroy his fathers company. Fischer wanted to know why he would do this which is why he agreed to go into, what he believed to be Berenger’s mind, when the team was really taking him into level three of his own SUBCONSIOUS.<br> <br>It was in level three where the team constructed the snow fortress which housed the information that Fischer thought was in Berenger’s mind when it was all an illusion to provide him with the emotional catharsis (his father telling him that he was disappointed that his son wanted to be like him) needed for the idea, of him not wanting to run his fathers company, to take hold.<br> <br>Level 4, didn’t really apply to Fischer as he was only being held hostage by Mal after the Inception was successfully completed. Once Cobb rescued Saito from limbo, everyone woke up including Fischer who now had the seed in his mind to give up his fathers company.<br> <br>UNDERSTAND NOW YOU FUCKING RETARDS?!?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:21 a.m. CST

    disinfogod got it right about harry

    by DioxholsterReturns

    "Inception at it's core does not telegraph emotions; Dom Cobb is really the only fully fleshed out character in the piece (primarily, I think, because the entire scenario is a construct of his own psyche, but that's best left discussed elsewhere), and his primary motivations are guilt, redemption and, ultimately, reconnection. These are contemplative emotions, and for all the whiz-bang action, it is a largely meditative film, not given to wild and heart-on-sleeve emotive outbursts. It has more in common with Ozu than with Capra, if you get my drift - and may be more pretentious than I give it credit for. Harry referred to it as "boring"; and for an individual wired into emotive diarrhea and cheap sentiment, I can see how he might find it boring on an affective level. The film expert in him recognizes Nolan's skill as a craftsman, but the emotional base can not recognize beyond the surface, and with a narrative that functions on at least five or more surfaces, it may be too much for him to process." <p> my thoughts exactly dude, Nolan work transpasses conventional storytelling and it seems not every is well-equipped to get the alternative means of conveying complicated emotions. Personally i find it refreshing to have that, it seems everything has been done before, no matter what it is we've seen it and bored by it but Nolan has a new take on this. He weaves his stories in a new way that to me feels like seeing movies for the first time again. <p> Harry on the other hand has already proved that hes opinions come from a different place, a place where movies like king kong, expendables and other crap gets him more excited. <p> as for me, im not gonna lie to you, the only martin scorsese movie that i found to be watchable was gangs of new york, i dont get his movies and i dont care for it. Scorseses way of telling stories and his interests are so lame i chose to ignore it completely and same thing applies to other famous filmmakers. Nolan rescued me from all these previous losers, so thats where i come from.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:21 a.m. CST

    ringwearer9

    by spider_neil

    absolutely 100% spot on. too much exposition, next to no character development= characters you didn't give a shit about. as for people having a problem with harry wanting them to 'dream bigger' I'm 100% with harry that is how the fucking movie was MARKETED, i.e. matrix world bending effects so excuse the people that were expecting that. inception is nolan's worse movie because the 'THE' main task of a film maker is to tell a story with complex characters that go on a journey (metaphorical) and are a different person at the end of the movie and that most certainly is not inception. yeah but the people that point this out 'don't get it' rolleyes

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:26 a.m. CST

    DO BE AFRAID TO DREAM BIGGER

    by Chariowalda_Barbarossa

    I disagree with Harry as I often do. In fact I was happy with Nolan showing some self restraint and not making this a completely over-the-top action extravaganza. Or worse, 3D. Without self restraint you might get shitty movies like the Matrix sequels or Avatar. Which, other than Inception, sucked. Inception is a feast for the eye and the mind which it couldn't be if Nolan wanted to fuck our eyeballs all the time. The film comes up with a nicely developed concept of dream sharing and piracy, sticks to it's strong internal logic, develops it further into a multi-level dream coup which you can follow very well at every point of time. It's illustrated with it's own mythology if you want so, the totems, the limbo, the Escher tricks and the ghosts of the past that haunt you. Making this a big ass action flick was absolutely not the point. Kudos to Nolan for not walking into the traps of CGI magic.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:27 a.m. CST

    I confess your review intrigued me, Harry

    by terry1978

    I figured you would have been one of the main ones talking about how the flick was a massive mindfuck, how it literally fucked your brains, etc. I enjoyed it, but it wasn't as Hitchcockian as most people have made it out to be.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:33 a.m. CST

    spider neil

    by jackalcack

    I'm not sure I fully understand this quote of yours'... "how anyone can give a movie a 'pass' with no character development is beyond me. where was JGL backstory? or hardy's? give me a break, how are you supposed to care about a character if you can't see what motivates them" <p> In Alien, apart from Ripley and Ash, what are the other characters' backstories? What about Aliens for that matter? What are Hicks, Hudson and Vasquez's backstories? How's about Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Halloween or The Thing? All genre classics with large casts of characters minus backstories or motivations beyond what they obviously do onscreen. Maybe you didn't care about any of these characters, or movies, either. I don't know.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:34 a.m. CST

    The paragraph about Shutter Island

    by centilope

    Cobb wanted badly to be together with his kids again, his kids need a father, especially that their mother fucking killed herself. He wanted it so badly not just because he loved his kids very much, and he hasn't seen them in quite a while, but also because he feels responsible for them now being without a mother and practically without a father as well. That's a convincing character motivation if you ask me, Leo sold me on it. You must have dosed off when all that was shown on screen. I read a review that said taking a bathroom break during this movie is at your own peril. So if you skipped 30-40 minutes of plot, you can't hold it against the movie, it's your own fault.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:35 a.m. CST

    Surreal dreaming wouldve killed the movie,

    by DioxholsterReturns

    like what donchild said above. man I have respect for Nolan for not succumb to to the need to go all crazy on us in these dreams, that tells me that Nolan isnt just some filmmaker who is getty about lazy storytelling like the others who rely on visual effects as a way to distract audiences from the shitty story. Here Nolan went all out to make the story stand out instead and the reality of these dreams were vital to that story. Harry is such a gloryhole of a nerd that he cant help but want silly crazy dream-worlds rather than complicated intellectual stories. and yeah that ending, is the best fucking ending in a movie that i ever seen in the past 2 decades.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:37 a.m. CST

    Bejesus, Harry...

    by WavingFlagsInSpace

    You really disappointed me, though you "could care less" I imagine (which does not mean what I think you think it means, by the way). 'Inception' was ambitious, original and thought-provoking cinema which you afforded a meagre review due to your misunderstandings.<p>I think that is unforgivable for a man who claims to love the cinema.<p>I can take you going all gooey over films that your 'friends' have made, such as Sly's highly derivative nostalgia fest, but to be so supercilious towards one of the more engaging filmmakers of our time is just crass, and smacks of ignorance.<p>Poor judgment, sir.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:41 a.m. CST

    jackalcack

    by spider_neil

    okay that is a fair comment (supporting cast having no developement) as I obviously love alien and aliens, the big difference been the thrust of the action was ripley not hicks etc therefore you cared if she lived or died, now had cobb been in the thick of the action then I would have cared as he was a developed character. the big problem was the movie focused too much on characters I didn't give a shit about. imagine if aliens without developing hicks focused on hicks for half the movie.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:41 a.m. CST

    WAS MICHAEL CAINE PERFORMING AN INCEPTION ON COBB?

    by ChristianTerroristMilitia

    For all you fuckwads that think the movie was cold, it was very emotional. The team created a fake emotional catharsis for Fischer while Cobb experienced a true one by learning to let go, over the guilt he felt over Mal’s death, which he felt responsible for. This is the reason why I think that Michael Caine was the one performing the actual Inception on Cobb which was alluded to by Mal when she mentioned how Cobb himself must have thought it was strange that he was being chased by nefarious corporations, perhaps representing the feelings of guilt Cobb had in his subconscious. It also explains why Cobb’s children never change appearance. Also, the reason why he can’t see their faces is because of the shame his conscious and subconscious mind feels over his part in his wife’s death. That’s why the ending DOES take place in reality despite Nolan being cute with the top. Cobb was back in reality and his children looked the same because Caine had just performed the Inception. END OF FUCKING STORY!!!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:42 a.m. CST

    You didn't understand it. Most people don't

    by tpbeta

    It takes about a week to figure out the plot. Then it blows your mind. If you can't be bothered, go here http://www.chud.com/articles/articles/24477/1/NEVER-WAKE-UP-THE-MEANING-AND-SECRET-OF-INCEPTION/Page1.html

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:42 a.m. CST

    Ringwearer9

    by jackalcack

    "this is the last gasp for Nolan as a filmmaker of non-Batman films" <p> Do you really believe that? Inception is demolishing the box office, people are going back and watching it more than once. Every single person I know who's seen it has loved it. <p> If you were talking about, for instance, M.Night who's films have been steadily failing crtically and financially more and more each time then I'd agree with you but we're talking about someone who's on the role of his life. You may not like it, but Nolan is here to stay.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:43 a.m. CST

    Although "surreal" is the right word to describe Inception world

    by DioxholsterReturns

    when your dead wife comes out of no where to kill your mission then thats definitly surreal and that scene where he paused and didnt shoot her and he was saying something about that it could be the real mal. Leo's delivery was ace i totally cried throughout that movie. so many cool scenes, its definitly a mindfuck but one with a deep emotional base and an adventure to boot. I dont think anyone can top that. <p> Harry i cant wait to read your Sucker Punch review, maybe then you might realize your mistake.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:43 a.m. CST

    centilope, Harry saw the movie TWICE

    by Ringwearer9

    He didn't take a bathroom break the second time. He saw it a second time because he didn't feel he could review it the first time, having fallen asleep for 30 minutes the first time.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:49 a.m. CST

    HARRY, INCEPTION WAS ABOUT TWINKIES!!! UNDERSTAND NOW???

    by ChristianTerroristMilitia

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:57 a.m. CST

    The thing about Inception is that YOU dont need to understand it

    by DioxholsterReturns

    I thought the plot was easy to follow and and there was enough explanations for the viewer to get whats going on. It wasnt a matter of not getting it but a matter of whether you understand the underlining theme to it. Ive learned alot about people by hearing or reading their explanations about the ending. you can tell whether that person is an optimist or nihilistic. Inception will be a hot topic on the philosophy circuit for sure.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 7:59 a.m. CST

    Jackalcalk, I explained it in my previous post

    by Ringwearer9

    What Nolan made with "Inception" was an ugly, badly told, boring film about an interesting idea. The film's "popularity" rides on the interesting idea alone, not the pleasure the audience got from the way it was told, which was horrible. Nolan's popularity rides on being the director who lucked out in being attached to BATMAN movies. This is what impelled so many to go see this film (and because the film's marketing made it look good). As for people going back to see it twice? That's the "Emperor has no clothes" effect, where people missed plot details because the movie was so inept at conveying them, but were afraid of being labeled dumb for not "getting it" and going back a second time to try and "get it". A GOOD movie, a well-told movie, wouldn't force so many people into doing that. And come the next Nolan non-Batman film, I suspect a lot of people would rather skip the movie than have to deal with all that con-man "you have to see it multiple times to truly get it!" bullshit. They'll just go see some movie that looks enjoyable instead.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    Ringwearer9, INCEPTION "sucked" and was a "piece of shit"???<p> Dude, the people on this board saying it's good but not a masterpiece i'll listen to. But to call INCEPTION a piece of shit is quite frankly... ridiculous.<p> Ringwearer - you lose credibility with that comment. I'll also remember your prediction that this movie is 'career ending' for Nolan. We'll see how that plays out, eh?<p> WavingFlagsInSpace, *you* get it!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:03 a.m. CST

    Inception is going to end Nolans career?

    by Seph_J

    I mean... what? I must have read ringwearer say that... but I also must have blocked it out. <p> I mean... what?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:06 a.m. CST

    Career Ending, Cobra--Kai. CAREER ENDING

    by Ringwearer9

    Just as KING KING 2005 was career ending for Peter Jackson.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:09 a.m. CST

    Someone please tell me...

    by Seph_J

    ....who "dreamed bigger"... Chris Nolan with Inception... <p> or <p> Roland Emmerich with 2012. <p> I just can't work it out...

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:09 a.m. CST

    Harry's review is valid albeit stupid to the max

    by DioxholsterReturns

    Its his opinion and i cant fault him for that, and he does make points that alot of other stupid critics make. They simply cant find anything to criticize the movie on, they simply go criticizing it for not being the movie they thought it was. THE MOVIE IS NOT ABOUT BIG LOUD MONSTROUS DREAMS STUPID! add to that it was shared dreaming, a lovely way of saying they go into the subconscious in a very controlled manner. plus most dreams if not all consist of worlds that are largely similar to the real world but with more creation freedom and opportunity to roam beaches to huge urban landscapes.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:10 a.m. CST

    Yeah but Harry lied in previous excuses

    by D.Vader

    Said it's a movie one needs to see multiple times to understand it's "depth". Now he says he fell asleep the first time. How can anyone trust this guy or anything he says web he contradicts himself and misleads and lies to his audience? His credibility and any attempt at professionalism is gone. <p> I know he'll say he never pretended to have it anyway, but anyone who lies to his audience deserves to be called out on his pathetic behavior, and from now on, there is no reason why ANY of us should ever trust anything he says. <p> I don't care whether he liked In Inception or not (though his explanations for his opinions are often hypocritical and lacking serious thought sometimes), I just care that he remains honest. And whatever vestige of honesty he had is now gone in my book with this debacle.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:11 a.m. CST

    Shutter Island was about mental illness

    by Joely_Boy

    It's not really that similar in comparison to Inception. <P>Besides, none of this will matter when Enter The Void comes out to blow everything away. Gaspar Noe is THE REAL DEAL.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:13 a.m. CST

    Harry wants Cobb to fly over cities with a lightsaber!

    by DioxholsterReturns

    Harry would get a geekgasm!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:16 a.m. CST

    "web" = "when"

    by D.Vader

    Damn auto spelling correct.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:17 a.m. CST

    He slept 30 minutes during

    by DioxholsterReturns

    first he cant control his bladder and now he sleeps through a movie. i watched Inception after midnight Harry, if i was ever sleepy before seeing it I FUCKING WOKE UP ONCE THIS EPIC MOVIE BEGAN!!!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:18 a.m. CST

    inception contains..

    by emeraldboy

    one of the most outstanding sequences ever put on film in modern times. I looked at it and thought How the hell did they do. you see that scene very briefly in the trailer but the whole sequence is incredible. and I as i say its the most outstanding sequence put on film in modern times. but the bond style sequence took me out of the film completely. but I didnt fall asleep. harry should give up writing reviews.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:19 a.m. CST

    D.Vader, what are you going on about ...

    by Ringwearer9

    Harry told the truth about why he didn't review it the first time ... he fell asleep during it. So what if he fibbed a bit about why he needed to see it again before he reviewed it in a few talkback comments? He did need to see it again, for whatever reason, and he came clean when he finally put down an extended review as to why. And many people who did NOT fall asleep during it felt they had to see it twice anyway.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:21 a.m. CST

    everyone should try to remember

    by Seph_J

    that incredible feeling of excitement which they felt about 20 minutes into Inception when it gradually began to become clear just how intelligent and engaging the film was. Hans Zimmer gave it an awesome atmosphere and importance. <p> Think back to being in the cinema when you first began to realise what Nolan was attempting and then tell me he needed to "dream bigger!" <p> Thats fucking annoyed me that has.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:24 a.m. CST

    Ringwearer

    by D.Vader

    Harry never said anything about falling asleep the first time he saw it until now. Previous excuses implied he felt the need to see it twice to understand it's depth. Those were his words (possibly paraphrased as I can't go back and check at the moment). Now systems he fell asleep. It's dishonest.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:25 a.m. CST

    harry didnt like the snow scene even it was the most surreal

    by DioxholsterReturns

    what a fucking hypocrite. do you want surreal or not?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:26 a.m. CST

    Seph_J, Hans Zimmer's score sucked as well.

    by Ringwearer9

    It was boring and repetetive, an endless honking, without emotion, or melody. HONK. HONK. HONK. HONK ... Jesus Christ, it was so heartless and incessant!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:27 a.m. CST

    Scott Pilgrim vs The World opens at #5 at Box office!

    by DioxholsterReturns

    suck it you pieces of shit wipe

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:27 a.m. CST

    INCEPTIONIS GOLD-SHUTTER ISLAND IS SHIT

    by THE TRUE PINBACK

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:28 a.m. CST

    D. Vader, this his official review

    by Ringwearer9

    So what if he didn't give the whole story when being nagged in talkbacks. He told the truth in his review. That's what matters, right? Not some throwaway excuse in a talkback.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:29 a.m. CST

    Ringwearer9

    by jackalcack

    Everything you just said is your own opinion, yet you state it like it's fact. <p> If you truly believe that the reason people who are going to see it again because they didn't understand it and don't want to look 'dumb' then fair enough, but I can't help feeling you are projecting your own thoughts and agenda here. <p> In my experience the ordinary film going public really don't care all that much about movies. They have far more important things in their lives to think about. Movies are entertainment and if they are entertained or affected either emotionally or intellectually (in a positive way) they'll take time out from their busy lives to pay to watch a movie again. I find it very hard that something as negative as feeling self-conscious they didn't understand the film would motivate them to rush out immediately and watch it again. <p> This is, as I already mentioned, just my experience of people. Maybe we hang out in very different circles.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:30 a.m. CST

    Ringwearer

    by Seph_J

    yes and I also think that Mozart was just endless BLARPING. BLARP BLARP! And beethoven... damn that TINKLING. TINKLE TINKLE TINKLE. <p> I bet you would have preferred Zimmers King Arthur/Gladiator/RC scores to have been used instead though right?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:32 a.m. CST

    career ending for Nolan ??

    by Miyamoto_Musashi

    this talkback keeps getting funnier and funnier, are people trolling or creating "characters" to act as an insane person (see Mediah Messiah)<br />Nolan for me was the director of the last decade, hit after hit and he has started off this decade with what for me is the movie of the year (so far).<br />Spoilers below<br />though I think this talkback is a free for all in regards to spoilers<br />Saw it again today, and think I noticed the emotional/character aspects of the movie even more. The scenes involving Mal's death, Cobb reuiniting with his kids and effectively not caring whether its a dream or not and Fischer's confrontation with his father were absolutely incredible<br />Also emphasised for me the brilliance of Ken Watanabe and Tom Hardy. Though have been a huge fan of Watanabe for a while. <br />I don't want a sequel to this movie, certainly dont want a prequel, but would love to spend some more time with Eames and Arthur in some other format

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:32 a.m. CST

    Nightmare On Elmstreet 3 = Nail in Coffin

    by m_prevette

    I've strongly disliked most every Nolan movie , HATED Batman Begins, but liked - not loved - Inception a lot...brainy and ambitious. Trying for more. Harry's review, while not saying he has to love it, shows he has no freaking business reviewing movies. Ever.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:36 a.m. CST

    they should give Nolan tons and tons of money

    by DioxholsterReturns

    to do what he wants, please Studio Execs give him everything the man is a genius!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:46 a.m. CST

    Harry liked Spider-man 3

    by s0beurself

    but didn't dig Inception? Time to stop reading Harry's reviews.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:47 a.m. CST

    You are very fucking wrong Harry...

    by Lacloake

    I'm telling you now Inception will be up there with the likes of Blade Runner as a cult classic in a few years time...

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:50 a.m. CST

    Ringwearer- he told the truth? Huh-wha?

    by D.Vader

    "He told the truth in his review. That's what matters, right? Not some throwaway excuse in a talkback." <p> How do you know after he's lied in previous talkbacks? That's the whole point. You can't say "he told the truth in this review" because you don't really fucking know, do you? You don't know for sure. I don't know for sure. All I know, is I don't trust anything he says now after feeding us excuses for over a month, excuses that now don't agree with each other.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:50 a.m. CST

    Could no be vested in Cobb...

    by rxse7en

    Did he really care to get back to his kids when he and his wife spent so much time in their dreams? I felt he was a soulless, greedy, neglectful parent and though he may have finally redeemed himself his journey there--for me--was shallow and somewhat inhuman.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:54 a.m. CST

    Inception IS a great film.

    by Seph_J

    Harry knows that (unless he really is a fucking soft-headed cretin) <p> He thinks this is the only way he can make his stupidly late review relevant. By making it so completely wrong that everyone feels the need to comment.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:55 a.m. CST

    Inception's ending was just the same as The Matrix

    by Joely_Boy

    Reloaded ending when Neo killed the squids with his mind. Before we saw Revolutions we all thought the same thing: That what we thought was real was not. Nothing new!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:56 a.m. CST

    Harry, Harry, Harry for shame..

    by subfreq

    Where ever your misunderstandings of this film may lie, it's not for anyone else to say you have to like the film of course but you have really let yourself down int hat review by closing it; <br><br> "Of course - maybe these are the dreams of executives. In which case, I'll choose the dreams of artists. Every time." <br><br> That is a cheap shot, badly aimed. <br><br> I don't necessarily venerate Nolan but geez as Octaveaeon points out there is more going on in this film than the banal reading you took from it.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:58 a.m. CST

    Joely_Boy

    by Seph_J

    But Revolutions completely ignored that and it never really came to anything. Which is why Matrix sequals = general failure. <p> Inception made use of everything is set up, and stuck to its own rules.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 8:59 a.m. CST

    And...

    by rxse7en

    I loved the movie.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9 a.m. CST

    Shutter Island "vastly superior"?

    by JShanW

    I told a friend that I was about to watch Shutter Island on Netflix...he said "Ugh...I figured it out in 20 minutes."...after watching it myself, I had to call him back and say "That piece of shit took you 20 minutes to figure out? I had it before they got off the damn boat!"

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:03 a.m. CST

    OH BOY!!!! THIS IS GRRRREAT!!!

    by L.H.Puttgrass

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:04 a.m. CST

    Inception will be seen as a masterpiece

    by DioxholsterReturns

    in the same way 2001 space oddessy or blade runner is seen today

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:04 a.m. CST

    Octaveaeon, are you Slavoj Zizek?

    by Joely_Boy

    Cos you talk as much shit as him! Too long!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:06 a.m. CST

    Thank you, Harry.

    by Holeman

    I can understand and sympathize with all of your points and after seeing it 4 times now, I have many of these same problems. The story structure is weak, the character motivations are slim to nonexistent and the dreams themselves are bland and uninspired. I do have a major issue with you claiming that "Shutter Island" is a better film, because "Shutter Island" is a raging piece of shit and arguably Scorsese's worst film. I would also like to say that I wish you hadn't caved to the cunts who posts here (and seriously, you could lose this talkback and just have message boards and this site would be improved a lot!) and written this review. Who gives a fuck if you don't review this movie? You sure as hell shouldn't.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:08 a.m. CST

    Shutter Island ain't about any twist, you fools

    by Joely_Boy

    It's about the delusions of a paranoid schizophrenic, his bi-polar/manic depressive wife, and the conscience of a man who would rather play crazy than deal with the realities of all that has transpired in his unfortunate life...

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:11 a.m. CST

    OH BOY!!!! THIS IS GRRRREAT!!!

    by L.H.Puttgrass

    Anybody remember Animal House? That scene where Flounder is in the middle of the riot at the end of the film? And he's just beaming as he takes in all the chaos? <p> Remember that? And then he says,"OH BOY!!!! THIS IS GRRRREAT!!!" <p> That's how I feel reading this TB! Thank you, Harry. Thanks for posting your review. THIS IS GREAT!!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:12 a.m. CST

    If you think Shutter Island is just a simple

    by Joely_Boy

    predictable thriller... WRONG! The story is merely the vessel for deeper themes, which ultimately make it VASTLY superior to INEPTion.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:14 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    Holeman, you hated INCEPTION so much you watched it 4 times?!<p> What do you do with movies you love?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:15 a.m. CST

    Yeah Holeman, that does not compute

    by D.Vader

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:16 a.m. CST

    No, Shutter Island is...

    by JShanW

    ...a flaming ball of fail wrapped in a pseudo-noir coating ladled with a thin layer of Scorcese's inability to end a movie at the right place. Sorry, anyone who says different is just plain wrong. There is no wiggle room here.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:18 a.m. CST

    Shutter Island was Trash!

    by SCOTTPLIGRIMFAILEDMISERABLY

    I liked Dream Warriors though, just not sure how it made it into this review!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:19 a.m. CST

    by jackalcack

    "Of course - maybe these are the dreams of executives. In which case, I'll choose the dreams of artists. Every time." <p> This quote strongly implies to me that Harry has some personal agenda towards Nolan here. This review is a month late and very, very short. I suspect if he hadn't been harassed, we'd have never seen a review. <p> In my opinion there is something else going on here. Exactly what we'll never know. My guess is that Nolan has snubbed or offended Harry in some way and his delaying the review and the subsequent publishing of a couple of token paragraphs is Harry's way of sulking, like the giant man-child we all know he is.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:20 a.m. CST

    Cobra--Kai

    by MJs_Cold_Dead_Pale_Corpse

    He shoves them in your mom's pussy

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:22 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    Spider_Neila and Ringwearer, most films don't set up back stories for the supporting characters. That would be boring exposition. What they do is create a compelling enough 'universe' that the viewer can fill in the blanks themselves.<p> In INCEPTION for example, I filled in the blanks to assume that JGL's character was Cobb's most trusted friend and had loyally done Inception's and dream heists with him for several years. Tom Hardy's character also had history with Cobb, they'd done at least one assignment together where they got the job done successfully but Hardy had shown himself to be more of a raconteur and a risk taker than 'yes man' JGL.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:22 a.m. CST

    SCOTTPLIGRIMFAILEDMISERABLY

    by DioxholsterReturns

    hahahaha

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:26 a.m. CST

    So He Didn't Like INCEPTION, But Orgasmed For EXPENDABLES?

    by LaserPants

    Geez, Harry. You've just lost any fleeting, microscopic shred of critical credibility that you may have once had. You're just a sad, imbecilic Manbaby writhing in poopy diapers and cumming to cultural detritus. Maybe Nolan should have written you a bigger check? Clearly Stallone wrote a big one for you.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:26 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    MJs, how would you shove a movie into a pussy? Are you talking about the physical DVD box? Or more of a metaphysical thing? Or are you just a witless little man who lives to type unpleasantness anonymously on the internet?<p> I think the latter.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:27 a.m. CST

    Harry is justifying hes sleeping in the review.

    by DioxholsterReturns

    a great movie right in front of you and you not seeing it. instead you earn for something different.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:30 a.m. CST

    I liked PUMPKINHEAD better than Shutter Island

    by dead youngling

    So is it going to be "cool" now to diss on Inception? That's a club I won't join.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:30 a.m. CST

    anyone who thinks inception is going to be

    by spider_neil

    held in the regard as blade runner 10 years from now is IN-SANE, this movie will be forgotten about in a couple of years (TOPS!)

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:31 a.m. CST

    Oh well, what were we to expect?

    by sam jacksons wig

    I have said my two cents worth and will not repeat myself here, other than to say each to their own, and not everyone will like the same things. <br><br> Personally, I really liked the movie, and not for Nolan and his skills, but for me as its my kind of movie. If someone else had directed it, would it have been better? That is something that can be debated forever.<br><br> Maybe Harry can grow further appreciation when it materialises on Blu Ray. <br><br> Oh, and ScottPilgrimFan, you're a dick.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:32 a.m. CST

    I dont give a fuck

    by Out of your element

    About what some fat idiot said about a generally solid movie.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:33 a.m. CST

    Vacation tomorrow.

    by sam jacksons wig

    Yes!!!!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:34 a.m. CST

    Scott Pilgrim Fan, I Don't Know If You're Paying Attention

    by LaserPants

    But your movie? It was a BOX OFFICE BOB-OMB. Sorry! It looks cool, though. I like the comics. I look forward to watching the movie on dvd sometime in September.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:36 a.m. CST

    spider_neil

    by sam jacksons wig

    Inception and Blade Runner are two different animals. Blade Runner was something completely different when it was first released, and as such it will live on as a true classic.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:36 a.m. CST

    Sheesh...!

    by Lemure_v2

    Anyone who thinks Nolan's career is over needs help.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:38 a.m. CST

    LaserPants

    by sam jacksons wig

    As per my previous post, SPF is a complete dick. I will enjoy watching him eat his own ill timed words as guff like the Expendables tromps all over SPVTW.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:42 a.m. CST

    Well

    by EliteStance

    I guess if after two viewings you don't actually get the basic rules of the piece then you're not in a good place. To be blunt - if you're going to even try and be a bit professional then with a film like this wandering in when falling asleep on your feet is simply doing the whole endeavor a disservice, from the film itself to this site to your own status. Next time skip the first viewing when you know you shouldn't and make sure your first viewing is when you're perfectly ready.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:45 a.m. CST

    SPOT ON REVIEW

    by spikeandjezebel

    I don't always agree with your reviews Harry, especially for tentpole films, but this review is bang on. Well done.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:52 a.m. CST

    Irresponsible review.

    by HarryWannaBe

    Regardless of your final take on this movie, Harry... it seems very irresponsible of you to have gone into the viewing in such a state! It's like you set yourself up to dislike the film. You can hardly compare doing 'BNAT', where you're surrounded by a ton of people doing the same thing and the atmosphere is entirely different to simply not getting enough sleep prior to a regular film viewing in a regular situation like this. 'Inception' is not what put you to sleep, your lack of proper rest prior to seeing the film is the culprit! You've got a job where you're lucky enough to see a shit-ton of movies, the majority of which you get to see for free...but you've also got a responsibility to see said movies in a clear and fresh state of mind! There's no reason you had to see this movie THAT early after not having enough sleep and rest. Trust me, the patrons of this site would have waited for you to see a later screening before you posted a review. Don't get me wrong, I don't mean to imply that had you waited and were "bright-eyed and bushy-tailed" for the movie that your opinion would be any different, it just feels you didn't give the film a fair chance from the get-go!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:52 a.m. CST

    Thank God, Harry

    by Rebeck2

    Nice to know you saw the emperor wasn't wearing any clothes. It's been embarrassing watcthing the geeks go crazy for such a mediocre movie.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:53 a.m. CST

    @Kal Reeve

    by IKilledSuperman

    Agreed. While I like what he did with Bats, Superman would be better served by a team that understands big irreverent action better than he does. I wouldn´t mind Emmerich, Sommers or even Bay having a go at Superman. It needs some fun and big action for a change. As to Inception, I for once agree with Harry. May taste better on second viewing at home, though. But hey, throwing Nightmare 3: Dreamwarriors into the review just bc it´s also about dreams....come on, Harry. Totally different levels of film-making and content.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:54 a.m. CST

    Took the words right out of my mouth

    by tronknotts

    This is exactly how I felt about Inception. Incredibly clever and well crafted, but totally lacking in character. The guy dreams about... hotels? Shadow Moses? That's it? Maybe the sequel will add a little more character to the proceedings.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:58 a.m. CST

    What you don't seem to get

    by sam jacksons wig

    Is that the dreams had to be grounded in reality for the Inception to take place. If there were green clouds and talking beavers then the targets would have thought something was " a little odd..."

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 9:58 a.m. CST

    HARRY PREFERRED HIS OWN DREAMS!

    by DioxholsterReturns

    the mention of dreams in the movie has compelled Harry to sleep!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:04 a.m. CST

    Octaveon, insightful but I think it misses the point somewhat

    by TallanDagwood

    All of us bring to and take out of an movie going experience different things. Some - such as yourself can extract a treatise that fully supports your own perception, while others will simply say they liked it or disliked because it was good/not good. With no further explanation warranted or needed. And that is fine, because movies like most entertainment experiences are primarily enjoyed at the surface level -you either like it or you do not.<p> Certainly entertainments can achieve a visceral level of response, but it is still is a subjective level. <p> A treatise such as your own, while providing potential insight into areas that may have been overlooked, still only serves as supplemental information to someone who has already decided they liked/disliked they same entertainment, based upon their own criteria. <p> Simply telling someone to look deeper- and providing excellent guide marks for doing so, still will rarely alter a someones initial perception. An example: You view a work of art hailed as a masterpiece, but all you see are ugly brushstrokes. Someone who knows the history of the work provides insight into the artists angst while crafting it, his motivations and the thought that went into it. It helps you understand why he did what he did, but the work still looks like ugly brushstrokes to you.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:06 a.m. CST

    "OH BOY!!!! THIS IS GRRRREAT!!!"

    by L.H.Puttgrass

    Hey, Harry. Here's a thing or two I learned about watchin' movies back in '90. I was in the Navy and I had just got off duty. Some of my friends were going to see Dick Tracy and even though I had been up for well over 24 hours I went with them. <p> I should have just gone to bed. <p> I remember the cartoon Rollercoaster Rabbit, some primary colored sets and costumes, and the credits (which is when I woke up). <p> Never. Ever. Go to a movie when you NEED to go to bed! Dark room. Comfy chair. Dude, you're sleepin'! Save your money. Stay home. <p> Lesson learned.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:06 a.m. CST

    sam jacksons wig ---- not to mention as an audience...

    by DioxholsterReturns

    ...we as an audience wouldve not felt the danger the characters faced if it had been set in silly Tim Burton-style worlds. There had to be that consistent element of not being sure whether youre in a dream world or reality hence the totem.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:07 a.m. CST

    Inception can't cure Harry's s sleep deprivation

    by centilope

    Therefore it is crap.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:08 a.m. CST

    Harry wanted Alice in Wonderland and not Inception

    by DioxholsterReturns

    what a joke of a review

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:12 a.m. CST

    Nolans Gift is his ability to

    by donchild

    take previously explored ideas/stories/themes and approach them in a way that hasn't been seen before. Whether or not Inception has similarities with Dreamscape, Matrix or whatever else is irrelevant , every movie shares a connection with a bunch of others, its the originality of the approach that counts. Nolan has proven with each of his movies that he can take material whether it be a novel, comic book, another movie (Insomnia) and rework it in a way that actually expands and often improves on the source.TDK for example took the basic concept of a hero defending the city against a villain bent on destroying that city with a masterplan. A standard plot in a lot of mainstream movies, except Nolan puts an entirely different spin on things by having the villain attempt to destroy the city by corrupting its most morally respected politician a man who has brought a fresh sense of hope to the city through his fearless tackling of Gotham's criminal infrastructure. The hero then thwarts the villain's scheme by taking the fall for the crimes committed by said politician thus keeping the moral spirit of the people intact! Right there! what other director would put that kind of spin on such a run of the mill storyline. Nolan is the man

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:19 a.m. CST

    Every movie has compromises, Nolan chose a less surreal world

    by DioxholsterReturns

    and for a very good reason. by now we all know that visual effects and all that nonsense gets old very fast. And for the last time it makes sense to have that way, not to mention how cool it is to see dreams mimic reality but in a flimsy way. yeah those enemy projections are bad ass. i got my own elite squad baby so dont even try Cobb, secrets stay with me!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:20 a.m. CST

    Best AICN review, ever.

    by awardgiver

    Goddamn I couldn't figure out what the big deal was about that movie. It was for pseudo-intellectuals who think they are smart.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:21 a.m. CST

    donchild--- right on good man

    by DioxholsterReturns

    i also cant believe that Nolan is for real. hes too good to be true.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:26 a.m. CST

    Should have watched it in full first

    by davidwebb

    before committing a single word to the page, Harry. <p> While I won't argue your points regarding character and plot, you're totally wrong in comparing it to IMAGINARIUM, OZ or DREAM WARRIORS. It is it's own beast; Nolan very much intended it to be more subtle than the films you make poor comparisons too. <p> I'm beginning to wonder if your heart is really in this anymore Harry. Maybe you enjoy producing, and participating in events and conventions more. But the sensible thing to do would be leave the site for someone else to worry about, and get own with the stuff you seem to enjoy more. <p> And yeah, the delay in this review seems a little 'off'. So you didn't like it. You didn't like Batman and Robin and look what happened there.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:30 a.m. CST

    Been with teh site since the start, Harry reviews never resonate

    by Stormwatcher

    Mori, Quint, VERN, Masa is probably my fav now, but Harry is a critic masquerading as a fan and adores shlock and his 'friends' case in point 'THE SUM OF ALL FEARS REVIEW' remember that masterpiece? find his review. So many crap movies he champions and then shits on ones that are maybe not masterpieces but made by people he doesn't like so he's super harsh, example Terminator \salvation, not great, but no the bowel movement he makes it out to be. Inception was great, maybe there wasn't enough stuff like Serbian movie for him

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:32 a.m. CST

    Harry, you're pretty spot on this time.

    by HypeEndsHere

    And now, much like Haley's Comet, I'll wait 76 years for that to happen again.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:34 a.m. CST

    Audiences fully embraced Inception

    by DioxholsterReturns

    so Harrys review doesnt matter. mainstream audiences loved it and this time they didnt go see the movie for the 3D or lame enviroments but for the story alone. Nolan did a terrific job and nothing harry or others could do about that.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:41 a.m. CST

    donchild...

    by Red Ned Lynch

    ...sadly, you have put your finger on one of the aspects of Nolan's style as a filmmaker that mark him as not yet ready to join the first rank of directors. <p> In science they call it confirmation bias. It is the psychological process of forming a notion of what you would like the result to be and then building your research to reach that conclusion regardless of whether the research actually indicates. And even though I pretty much love TDK that is certainly what Nolan did with the conclusion of the movie. <p> Answer this question for me. Why couldn't everything Dent did be blamed on the Joker, his minions or some vengeful remnant of any of the mobsters' gangs? What was gained, for the spirit of the city, by Batman taking the blame on himself? Why couldn't have Gordon and Batman created any damned story they wanted? One that would have made Dent a martyr to Gotham's rebirth while placing the Batman ever more securely in the role as the city's extralegal protector? <p> Give me a satisfactory answer to this question and I'll be glad to admit defeat. And when I say glad I really mean glad, because I do love the movie and that final chord strikes me as horribly, amateurishly false every time I watch it. <p> Now it wouldn't have been impossible to craft the movie in such a way that Batman taking the blame would have been the only logical, reasonable outcome. And that would, I agree, have been a fantastic ending. But from any direction I look at it, that is not what Nolan did. And that is a mark of someone who had not yet fully matured as a filmmaker. Now you can read what I wrote above and hopefully understand that I think Nolan could become one of our great directors. And when I say great directors I don't mean a superior director of disposable summer tentpoles. But right now that is what Nolan is, a great go-to guy for making damn tasty chain restaurant steaks. For me that would be Lone Star, but just insert the one you like best. <p> And hey, I'm grateful we have him, even in that capacity. But I look at Nolan's films and see hints that he's a guy who was a better destiny than being a better and more nuanced Raimi or Verbinski (and by the way I'm pretty happy Raimi's out there too, and think if Verbinski learned some discipline I would be pretty happy to have him).

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:41 a.m. CST

    How fucking stupid are some of you?

    by Chemicals

    It's funny how utterly dumb some of the lovers are in here. You think you're all smart and hip that you "got it" while those of us who saw a mediocre film are just too stupid for a film like this, yet your defense of the film shows you had no idea what was going on! I guess if I was stupid I'd be ashamed to admit it as well, but I certainly wouldn't come to a board like this and underline my stupidity by making ridiculous arguments. <p><p>The ski chase sequence WAS NOT FISHER'S DREAM! They just told him it was, they actually entered Tom Hardy's dream in that level. So all your blathering about how Fisher is a rich kid who fashioned himself as James Bond are DEAD FUCKING WRONG! <p><p>Also, if Fisher's subconscious, when they're actually in his dream, is alerted to defend him, then what would it matter if they flipped the street over or did any number of amazing things within the dream? The projections WERE ALREADY TRYING TO KILL THEM!! What, if you start doing wacky things to escape them then they'll REALLY want to kill you? And since the only projections in the ski sequence are already trying to kill them, what's the harm in flipping the mountain over on itself? The movie consistently showed a lack of imagination. Leo says to that Cisco chick that they can build things that could never exist in reality. So of course when we go to his dream world it is just a regular cityscape with some water. Wow, amazing!<p><p>And if Nolan had any inkling of being a great filmmaker, the entire third act would have taken place in Saito's limbo, and explore that aspect of the dream world more. Hell, was Saito's brain even scrambled when he woke up on the jet? <p><p>The movie was boring as hell, and the twist that everything in the film is a dream revealed itself very early on, making the film even more boring. <p><p>Do I really care about some rich dude and his company fighting some other rich dude and his company? Do I care if they break into Fisher's subconscious "vault?" And how lame was that? It's always a safe or a vault in the dream? How lame is it that Nolan could only think of an elevator as a metaphor for going deeper into Cobb's subconscious? <p><p>I like how once the van is falling the next dream level is floaty and zero g, yet weren't they on an airplane before they went into the first dream? Shouldn't that fuck with gravity and movement also? Oh wait, then the movie would have to make sense. You know what, I obviously am too dumb to get it, how dare I ask such basic questions of such a flawless film! Forgive me...

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:44 a.m. CST

    Also, about IDEAS

    by Chemicals

    They say in the movie that a creator of an idea always knows the exact genesis of that idea, and how it came to firm in their mind. BULLSHIT! Anyone who has ever created anything or had what they think is a good idea half the time can't even really explain where the idea came from. They could explain some fragments of where it may have arisen, but a lot of times not even the originator of the idea knows exactly how it came to be in his head. Just another lame ass thing in this mediocrity.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:45 a.m. CST

    Harry is right. And Harry is wrong.

    by cinemixtape.com

    Nolan has probably made the best dream-related film possible. The trouble is, dreams are impossible to get right onscreen. The catch 22 is that while human beings buy into their own dreams while they're having them, no matter how "trippy," the audience for a film (as a collective) has to buy into what's onscreen. That's primarily why it's so grounded - not simply to serve the story. It's been said that nothing is more boring than hearing someone else ramble on about their own dreams. So to acknowledge that "Inception" is as good as it is (while not perfect) is quite an accomplishment in itself. I LOVED the movie on my first viewing but didn't care for it as much the second time because of some of the same gripes that Harry has. However, I don't necessarily blame Nolan directly for all of the shortcomings. It's an incredibly ambitious film, and certainly better than the Dark Knight (don't get me started on the awful ferry scenes) and I respect him for his attempt. As a whole I think it works because of his hard work, and what doesn't quite play is mostly because of how ambitious the concept is.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:45 a.m. CST

    Reloaded was about 4 million times better

    by Joely_Boy

    than Inception! The burly brawl, the massive freeway chase, the Architect... not to mention well framed shot composition where you could see exactly what was going on!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:46 a.m. CST

    Harry, great review.

    by ColonelFatheart

    I did like the movie, but many of your criticisms of the movie are mine, too. And you're right about SHUTTER ISLAND, too. It's far better. DiCaprio should get Oscar consideration for that.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:49 a.m. CST

    Choppah...

    by Red Ned Lynch

    ...at least I didn't say Outback. <p> Besides, I like the cheese fries and the free peanuts.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:50 a.m. CST

    Joely just stop

    by STLost

    you are embarrassing yourself. <P> The few scenes you mention from Reloaded? Worthless. They tried to expand on the concepts from the first Matrix and failed miserably. The Architect? Talk about convoluted.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:51 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    "Give me a satisfactory answer to this question and I'll be glad to admit defeat."<p> Red Ned I don't want you to admit defeat cos you always post interesting stuff, but I think the answer to your question can only be...<p> ...Nolan has the story sketched out for the third BATMAN movie and this is where the chess pieces need to be at the start.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:53 a.m. CST

    The ferry scenes in the Dark Knight were a

    by Joely_Boy

    great nod to the 60's Batman series where at the end of the episode Batman was faced with a dilemma that had two equally perilous choices. Same Bat-time! Same Bat-channel!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:53 a.m. CST

    Red Ned

    by jackalcack

    I guess if they'd blamed the Joker it would have been a lie that could easily have been found out. Also, Batman and Gordan are both men of honour and I doubt that pinning it on another party is something they'd have been willing to do, a step too far. <p> At least with the lie they told, the target (ie Batman) was complicit.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:55 a.m. CST

    The first Matrix is shit as.

    by Joely_Boy

    Reloaded took it to the next level

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 10:57 a.m. CST

    It begins

    by GimpInMyPants

    See how quickly this review is moving down the page? This wouldn't have happened if it had been placed on the left column along with all the other movie reviews.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:02 a.m. CST

    REEEAAALLY starting to lose any interest in Harry's take on film

    by braddavery

    Seriously. It's like he glorifies shitty movies and shits on ones that are well made. What kind of twisted logic is that? You slam Inception but you hail The Expendables??? You are a hack, dude. Sorry. You can find faults with ANY film, but you go OUT OF YOUR WAY to find faults with movies that are generally held in high regard while propping-up turds like The Expendables as if they are God's gift. Shame on you. I know that film is subjective, but subjectively, I think your opinions are awful and you shouldn't be reviewing film. Just stick to watching your garbage and loving it and leave reviewing to people who can be objective and unbiased. WE GET IT,YOU LOVE SHITTY MOVIES AND DISLIKE "WELL RECEIVED" ONES. What's more pretentious, being pretentious or acting like things you perceive to be pretentious are below you. Your reviews suck ass.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:02 a.m. CST

    THE_CHOPPAH

    by Joely_Boy

    What are your top 5 favourite films of all time?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:04 a.m. CST

    Gimp

    by jackalcack

    I wouldn't worry, something tells me it'll stay up near the top of the talkback list for a while...

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:04 a.m. CST

    Harry is all about wish-fullfillment

    by mortsleam

    See his review about Avatar, when he basically says he loves the movie because it's about a guy in a wheelchair who gets to walk, fight and bang a hot blue chick. He loves Expendable because it's about a bunch of old dudes on steroids who can still "get it up." He loves Scott Pilgrim because it's about a guy who actually gets to star in his own, completely self-obsessed, self-involved video game. <p>He disliked Matrix Reloaded because it didn't have vampires and werewolves (Tho the stated intention of the Matrix was to fool humans into believing they were living a normal life.) He disliked Inception because because the dreamworld was mundane and the objective was corporate espionage (tho the point of the dreamworlds were to lull the target into thinking he wasn't even dreaming, and in the end the point of the movie was to get Cobb to relinquish his guilt).<p>I'm not, by the way, saying anything about the subjective worth of any of these movies right now. I'm talking about Harry's reasons for liking them. All he's looking for is escape. When he gets it, he likes a movie. When he doesn't, he feels disappointed. He doesn't think about the rules of the movie, or the plot really, only the level to which he's allowed to escape into fantasy.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:04 a.m. CST

    "OH BOY!!!! THIS IS GRRRREAT!!!"

    by L.H.Puttgrass

    WOW!! Some of these guys should get a room! Or a ring! <p> Anyways, here's another thing or two I learned about watchin' movies. This time back in '86. I had finished bootcamp in Orlando and was waiting for my school. I had a bad day and just wanted to get off the base. So I found myself heading to the moviehouse. I ended up seeing Cronenberg's The Fly. Between the sparse and apathetic audience and my foul mood, I just couldn't get my head into the movie. It seemed wildly erratic and over the top. Just crazy. And I HATED it! <p> The rest of the week I kept thinking about it though. I couldn't shake the idea that I missed something. Something important. So I went back and seen it again. <p> Revelation! I don't know what movie I was watchin' before, but this was amazing! Same theater. Same 70mm print(cool). Different audience. Different mood. <p> Lesson: Don't see a movie when your mind is preoccupied with something else: bad mood, worries, death, taxes, etc. It will screw up your movie enjoyment. And a bad audience can only help push you further out of wack. It's like a perfect storm.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:04 a.m. CST

    Cobra-Kai...

    by Red Ned Lynch

    ...you know, I consider you one of the really big guns in these little talkbacks. The kind of poster who actually sometimes moves opinion by what you post. So...thank you.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:06 a.m. CST

    Gimp makes a bloody good point though

    by jackalcack

    I don't think I've ever seen a Harry review to not appear in the left hand 'Harry's reviews' column. <p> Again a reflection of not only the disregard he has of the film but his unwillingness to even review it.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:07 a.m. CST

    Harry, I know we are old Friends, but

    by JettL1993

    I don't think I have ever disagreed with you more. OF course we could have made the dreams over the top, but when we set out to make this picture we wanted to at least ground the dream world in some sort of reality. It's own reality of course but still a reality, being able to sprout wings and have dinner with jesus would make for a cool dreasm but it wasn't part of our vision<P>I hope that you will warm up to our film in the future and I still consider you a great friend...I just think you didn't "get" inception because you didn't allow yourself to get it

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:07 a.m. CST

    lol @ Chemicals

    by DioxholsterReturns

    dude you are way off its not even funny. watch the movie again

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:09 a.m. CST

    Jackalack...

    by Red Ned Lynch

    ...you know, I like your explanation. I don't consider it a fix for the structural problem, but you can bet the next time I watch TDK (which given how often I've watched it since it became cable convenient is likely to be sometime within the next couple of weeks) I will be doing so with your explanation in mind (not the easily discovered part, which I don't buy, but the character driven part, which I rather like).

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:10 a.m. CST

    by Cobra--Kai

    Red Ned, post a 'hello' in Live In Chicago?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:11 a.m. CST

    Inception pretends to be deep

    by smudgewhat

    But it's mega weak. Leo is decent in role, but not intelligent enough to make me believe it. The characters never wrestle with the moral implications of their actions. Missed a big opportunity there. I thought it sucked hard.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:13 a.m. CST

    JettL1993

    by jackalcack

    How's the screenplay coming along about the fake character you created which you're still masquerading as?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:14 a.m. CST

    tronknotts

    by Darth_Von_Stroheim

    An "Inception" sequel? Unlikely. Apart from the Batman movies, Nolan is not known for sequels. SCOTTPILGRIMFAN, you are the saddest, lamest one-note troll I've ever seen on a forum, EVER! You are more annoying than AsimovLives and his infamous "Jar Jar Abrams" rants!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:16 a.m. CST

    How does a movie "pretend to be deep"?

    by Thunderbolt Ross

    What the fuck.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:17 a.m. CST

    Chemicals - apparently he thinks you're weightless...

    by irishraidersfan

    ...on an airplane! <p> Seriously, dude, WTF? If you've ever been in a car accident, you get thrown around. Ever been on a plane? NOT the same thing. <p> As for Harry? Never thought I'd say this, but it is pretty obvious he didn't get the movie. I'm not saying it's not boring in parts, or that I emotionally connected with, well, any of the cast, but his point about "You mustn't be afraid to dream a little bigger, darling." - he obviously missed the entire 'make it seem real (at least their spin on real) or they'll know' current that RAN THROUGH THE ENTIRE MOVIE.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:17 a.m. CST

    Kid Idioteque000 about dreams being grounded

    by DioxholsterReturns

    you said : "The catch 22 is that while human beings buy into their own dreams while they're having them, no matter how "trippy," the audience for a film (as a collective) has to buy into what's onscreen. That's primarily why it's so grounded - not Kid Idiotesquesimply to serve the story. It's been said that nothing is more boring than hearing someone else ramble on about their own dreams." <p> i agree watching dreamlike sequences on screen are usually lame and wrecks of a director just trying hard to dazzle the audience. Tim Burton is an example of that. Nolan's subtle way of presenting dream worlds was indeed an accomplishment

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:17 a.m. CST

    Kid Idioteque000 about dreams being grounded

    by DioxholsterReturns

    you said : "The catch 22 is that while human beings buy into their own dreams while they're having them, no matter how "trippy," the audience for a film (as a collective) has to buy into what's onscreen. That's primarily why it's so grounded - not Kid Idiotesquesimply to serve the story. It's been said that nothing is more boring than hearing someone else ramble on about their own dreams." <p> i agree watching dreamlike sequences on screen are usually lame and wrecks of a director just trying hard to dazzle the audience. Tim Burton is an example of that. Nolan's subtle way of presenting dream worlds was indeed an accomplishment

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:17 a.m. CST

    mortsleam

    by Thunderbolt Ross

    I think you're absolutely right but don't you feel a bit dirty having given that much thought to the whole thing?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:17 a.m. CST

    "OH BOY!!!! THIS IS GRRRREAT!!!"

    by L.H.Puttgrass

    Hey,THE_CHOPPAH! GET BACK TO DA CHOPPAH!! NOOOOWOWWWW!!!!!!!! <p> Ahh, Bloom County. All the good cartoons are gone now... Calvin & Hobbs, The Far Side... <p> THE_CHOPPAH is trying to bring me down. <p> BUT HE CAN'T!!! <P> CUZ I LUV DIS TB!!!! <P> "OH BOY!!!! THIS IS GRRRREAT!!!"

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:19 a.m. CST

    smudgewhat

    by sam jacksons wig

    You can't invade dreams. Di Caprios characters actions are well scouted from the get go....and there are voices of reason throughout the movie. Wrong on all points. But hey- join the "I hate Inception" movie movement. I will sit quiety and love it for a sheer slice of entertainment.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:20 a.m. CST

    INCEPTION Wasn't "Pretending" To Be Anything But A...

    by LaserPants

    complex, clever, interesting, intelligent, noir-ish action movie with an engaging quasi-sci-fi premise. Which it was. It was also a film which the VAST majority of critics and viewers loved. Don't blame the film for your inability to keep up with it.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:21 a.m. CST

    double posting is considered cool from where i come from

    by DioxholsterReturns

    double me awesome bitches

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:22 a.m. CST

    Red Ned

    by jackalcack

    Glad I could be of service. I know what you mean about the ending, it was an incredibly odd way to go in terms of the city's well being, what with Batman being as much a hero as Harvey Dent. I guess the difference was that Harvey had a much more intimate dialogue with Gotham, whereas Batman was always a mysterious and dark character. At the end of the day, it was damage limitation and Batman took the hit because he was willing to. I really think this deception is as far as those two characters would be willing to go. <p> I also agree on your assessment of Cobra Kai. Him and BringingSexyBack are two talkbackers who can always be relied upon for amusement and insight.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:22 a.m. CST

    "burly brawl"

    by Thunderbolt Ross

    Has any scene ever not lived up to the hype like this one? Yes even including the car chase in Reloaded where "THEY BUILT A HIGHWAY JUST FOR THE MOVIE!!!!" ... Actually I don't know of any other movie that had hyped scenes like that. <p>Reloaded is like BSG ... Just taking a simple, effective concept too seriously and needlessly complicating it because Cornel West thought it was academically stimulating (Reloaded, not BSG hahaha).<p> Booooooo

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:23 a.m. CST

    DioxholsterReturns

    by sam jacksons wig

    Worldwide: $499,754,000. Budget $160m. I would say that its done a wee bit well, eh? Fuck the nay-sayers. And fuck ScottPilgrimFan. I fucking hate that trolling bastard!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:25 a.m. CST

    LaserPants

    by Thunderbolt Ross

    "noir-ish action movie with an engaging quasi-sci-fi premise" ... Totally agree and I think people for whatever reason think or want it to be something else. They refuse to experience the movie on its own terms. Naturally, the most beautiful horse in the world doesn't make for a very effective tiger.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:27 a.m. CST

    "OH BOY!!!! THIS IS GRRRREAT!!!"

    by L.H.Puttgrass

    THE_CHOPPAH's favorite TV show? <p> wait for it... <p> <p> wait... <p> Chopped.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:28 a.m. CST

    The Prestige is Nolan's Best Movie

    by Autodidact

    I love it so much.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:29 a.m. CST

    I don't see what's not to like about Inception.

    by sam jacksons wig

    Well acted. Well thought out. Well shot. So, it's a fucking dream. So what? People can actually do what is in SPVTW and the Expendables?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:29 a.m. CST

    In an alternate reality

    by Dawhiteguy

    Harry waited two weeks to post The Expendables review. What would it be worth to get your hands on that!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:30 a.m. CST

    Autodidact

    by sam jacksons wig

    The prestige is a great movie. i could even stomach David Bowie in it, and that's saying something.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:31 a.m. CST

    However, Nolans best is.....

    by sam jacksons wig

    Memento. And there it is....

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:32 a.m. CST

    What?

    by catlettuce4

    Harry can't have an opinion now? The movie didn't work for him, so the fuck what? He isn't "wrong" you know. He had a different opinion, that's totally valid. Doesn't mean the movie isn't well made, it means it didn't push his buttons.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:32 a.m. CST

    This is all fine and good, but

    by HypeEndsHere

    Does anyone know what the fuck Ken Watanbe is saying? Seriously. Hire American if something's going to hinge on that character's dialogue.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:37 a.m. CST

    HypeEndsHere

    by sam jacksons wig

    Maybe they needed a chink....why the fuck does it need to be an American?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:40 a.m. CST

    Ha, no I had no problem keeping up with it

    by smudgewhat

    What's to keep up with? 1 hour of a an falling off a bridge. 10,000 skiing assassins shooting 1,000,000 bullets that hit no one (except incomprehensible Ken W). I actually wish I cared enough to go back and count how many bullets were fired in that movie. More bullets does not = me caring. If I want deep I'll put on my "2001" DVD.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:40 a.m. CST

    Its Total Recall sans Mars

    by YoyodynePropulsionSystems

    I liked it, but the ending took me back to the reactor, Quaid.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:41 a.m. CST

    And box office mojo says...

    by sam jacksons wig

    Scott Pilgrim scored a modest estimated $4.5 million on around 3,000 screens at 2,818 locations, which was close to the opening day of Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist. However, it paled compared to Kick-Ass's $7.7 million launch. <br><br> Cunt off, SPF. Twat!!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:42 a.m. CST

    Van, not an

    by smudgewhat

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:42 a.m. CST

    HypeEndsHere

    by ColonelFatheart

    I had the same problem. I know Watanabe is a great actor, but to have him speak garbled English was a problem in the film and a disservice to him.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:42 a.m. CST

    INCEPTION:

    by PRESIDENT BALTAR

    Before dishing up a negative review of Inception, I have a confession to make: except for Memento, I have never been a fan of Chris Nolan’s films. In general, they strike me as cold, trudging exercises in technical show-offery. As my grandmother once said to me after a seal show at Sea World: “I was amazed, but not amused.” With that out of the way, let me say that Inception really just isn’t that great of a film. It has two main weaknesses: narrative sloppiness and weak characterization. As far as I’m concerned, the latter is the more egregious of the two, but the former is less endemic to modern big-budget filmmaking, and really strikes as the heart of what people like about Inception, so I’m going to spend most of my time discussing the sloppiness (Warning: spoilers ahead.) Any film has its own internal logic. In The Matrix, humans are necessary as power sources for the AIs. In Blade Runner, androids are identified by a Turing-type test. Do either of these make sense? No. But we accept them for the duration of the film – we suspend disbelief – because that makes it fun. When a film starts contradicting and playing fast-and-loose with its internal logic, however, it is punishing you for suspending disbelief. And this is what Inception does at every turn. For example, take the “limbo” dream-state, in which you are trapped if you happen to “die” in a dream while under sedation. Apparently you get out of limbo by…dying again? How does that make sense? And how does this make limbo a threatening prospect? “Oh no, I have to kill myself TWICE!”…? Then there is the “kick” that is used to wake someone up from a deeper dream level. In the example at the beginning of the movie, a kick at the upper dream level is sufficient to pull DiCaprio (or “Dom Cobb” as he is known in the movie, which is odd because he doesn’t look Burmese at all) out of the lower dream level. But in the film’s climax sequence, it seems as if a simultaneous kick at the lower dream level is also required for the kick trick to work. Even putting aside the fact that the time-dilation between dream levels would make simultaneous kicks INCREDIBLY hard to arrange, this seems like a pointless change of the rules. And then there is the issue of “dream powers”. If I can pull a grenade launcher out of nowhere in a dream (as a guy does in one scene), why can’t I fly? Or strike my dream-enemies down with a well-placed meteor? And if Cobb and his wife can age a lifetime in dream-limbo and then restore themselves to full youth right before they lay their heads on the train tracks, why does Saito let himself get old when he’s stuck in limbo? Etc. The list goes on, but I’m already running out of righteous indignation. The fact is, these holes in the film’s logic are not negatives for the film either commercially or critically, because what people enjoy about a film like this is the chance to argue about it afterward. Inception is a hit because it allows people to spend hours debating whether or not DiCaprio is REALLY dreaming at the film’s end, or what this or that little visual cue meant about what was REALLY happening. Of course, these debates never end, because the film is so sloppy, so careless with its own rules and logic, that any detail or anomaly could potentially be a deliberate cue, or it could simply be a piece of lazy writing. Nolan can’t lose. So if people are happy with the film’s incoherence, why am I unhappy? Because I suspect that this “feature” was accidental. Sloppiness is on display throughout the entire film (as when the pronunciation of Ken Watanabe’s character changes from “SAY-toe” to “SIGH-toe”), leading me to believe that many of the little discrepancies that so delight fans and critics are just dirt on the lens. And while people might call Nolan a genius for setting up a story structure that makes an asset out of sloppiness, I have to say that this just bores the hell out of me. Come on, now…everybody hates the “And I woke up, and it was all a dream” ending, don’t they? So why do people like a movie that sets itself up from Minute One so that the ONLY possible ending is a big fat question mark as to whether or not it was all a dream? Inception’s ending is the most telegraphed punch in film history. If this qualifies as a “mindfuck,” then I guess I like sex to be spontaneous. But even if the film were as tight and clever as, say, Twelve Monkeys (or, say, as Memento), I still would have had to stifle the urge to walk out halfway through. To explain why, let me write a sentence I’ve written many times before, and will sadly write many times again: I just didn’t care what happened to the characters. I’m not sure if weak characterization is more common in recent big-budget films, or if only films that have strong human stories are able to become classics after the novelty of their special effects becomes dated. Either way, I think I’m less tolerant of weak characters than much of both the film-watching public and the film-critiquing elites. Even if a film is a good intellectual exercise (which Inception is not), it’s generally not enough to hold my interest for 2.5 hours; after all, I get plenty of intellectual exercise in my PhD program. What I need is to care about the characters. And in Inception, as in all of Chris Nolan’s films except Memento, I did not care. The movie is filled with the stock characters that have become a sort of standardized shorthand for the theater-going public – the business mogul, the technical specialist, the serious assistant. As for the protagonist, the film resorts to what is rapidly becoming my most hated filmic cliche: the “perfect wife and kids” characterization. (Let me take a second to elaborate on this particular peeve of mine. Film critics will rant and rave against “pet the dog” characterization, where a protagonist is shown to be sympathetic by doing some random act of kindness. Well, these days, action movies try to make you like the guy in front of the camera by showing those glowy slow-mo sequences with him and his looks-ten-years-younger-than-s he’s-supposed-to-be wife and his pair of smiling towheaded children. You know the movies I’m talking about. Inception is one of them.) Add to this the fact that Leo DiCaprio will never ever be a good actor, and that Marion Cotilllard did a weak job as well, and even the quality acting skills of Joseph Gordon-Levittt and Ken Watanabe couldn’t make me care whether or not all of these people were thrown into eternal dream-limbo or not. In Memento, I shared an emotional connection with the protagonist through his fear; I sympathized with the hideous, nightmare terror of daily memory loss. I understood Leonard Shelby’s rage, his desperation, his fear, and so I wanted him to win. In Inception, all I could think was that if I woke up and found I had Dom Cobb’s ideal life, I would probably go back to dream limbo where I could dream myself up a grenade launcher. Sloppiness and weak characterization were enough to sink the film from my point of view, but there were little things too. There was precisely one moment of levity in the film: the scene where Joseph Gordon-Levitt tricks Ellen Page into kissing him. That was it. You’d think humor and warmth wouldn’t be a “little thing,” but in the Age of Nolan they’re more of an unexpected bonus when they do occur. And why didn’t we get to see more of the dream-producing technology? Apparently in the script, the technology is called PASIVE (Portable Automated Somnacin IntraVEnous). Good thing someone somewhere bothered to write down that train-wreck of an acronym; I’d probably have gone with WHOOPDESHIT (Weak Hole-filled Overly Obvious Plot DEvice SHIT). All in all in all, Inception is best summed up by the unintentionally hilarious line DiCaprio tosses off to explain why his and his wife’s idea of dream-heaven was an infinite forest of rectangular office towers: “We love buildings of this type.” Chris Nolan decided he loved films of this type, and set out to make one without worrying overmuch about details like logical coherence, characterization, and humor. And the public ate it up. Um…I’m looking for a devastatingly witty ending line here…think I’ll just go with: WHOOPDESHIT.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:43 a.m. CST

    smudgewhat

    by sam jacksons wig

    1,350,521 bullets, squarely aimed at Harry Knowles fat ginger arse.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:45 a.m. CST

    dailysportspages, don't forget about Jacob's Ladder

    by ufoclub1977

    A "dream" movie with a guy just wanting to get back to his normal life and in the end reuniting with his kid and leaving the "HELL".

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:45 a.m. CST

    PRESIDENT BALTAR

    by sam jacksons wig

    Man, learn to paragraph- no-one is going to read that slash...

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:46 a.m. CST

    "OH BOY!!!! THIS IS GRRRREAT!!!"

    by L.H.Puttgrass

    Thunderbolt Ross- Well said.<p> I like that horse/tiger bit. <p> Preconceived notions about a film can really fuck up your movie enjoyment. Which is why the ad campaigns for movies can screw a movie over if they don't represent the movie correctly and make people think its about something its not.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:46 a.m. CST

    HypeEndsHere

    by kolchak

    I've seen it three times and his lines tripped me up every. single. time.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:50 a.m. CST

    Also, how is this not in the "Top Stories" column?

    by kolchak

    Oh, right. This has nothing to do with Scott Pilgrim or Sly Stallone.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:51 a.m. CST

    Should we all disclose the state of mind...

    by The Dum Guy

    We were(wolved) in, at the time we saw Inception? Just so we put a frame of reference on our mindsets (refering to Puttgrass's post above).<br><br>Me: I caught a near full, late nite, Friday (opening day) screening. I'd had shit for sleep the night before, had a massive hangover from staying up too late getting smashed with friends (some who I hadn't seen in years).<br><br> All because, I had to wake up at 7 in the morning to attend a friend's funeral, then drive four hours back to my house.<br><br>Maybe, feeling like shit and having to deal with shit, made me like Inception more so.<br><br>But, I don't think so, 'cause I went and saw it again the next day and like it even more so.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:53 a.m. CST

    PresidentBaltar: Entertaining review.

    by ColonelFatheart

    But please use paragraph breaks next time.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:54 a.m. CST

    INCEPTION just never really gave pwesents to Harry

    by SierraTangoFoxtrotUniform

    Which is why he hates it. Had Nolan come to this site to do a Q&A (even though I thought it was awesome that Sly did that) he would have received the same accolades and positive reviews as Harry's buddy with his Expendables movie.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:54 a.m. CST

    Red Ned Lynch

    by TallanDagwood

    I agree completely with what you wrote regarding Nolans present limitations as a Director. <p> As talented as he is, I believe his key failing as a writer /Director is his over reliance on theme and his single mindedness to enforce and reinforce that theme over and over again - regardless the illogic it produces. <p>TDK was about Dark/Light or Dark Knight vs White Knight and come heck or high water Nolan was going to show that what the city (and audience) may have perceived on the surface was not really the truth -but it would be necessary to protect that ignorance because Gothamites are a weak minded sort who can not face the truth and thus create for themselves absolutes of black and white with no room for grey -when in reality it is Nolan who is seeing those absolutes. <p>Batman is called the dark knight not the charcoal grey knight.<p> I enjoyed TDK, but the constant requirement for taking a leap into the illogic, diminishes my overall enjoyment. <p>I see TDK as an attempt to make a more mature comic book movie, but when confronted with the double whammy of conforming to Nolans thematic insistence and the inherent contradictions in a comic book hero existing in the real world, Nolan fell back on staid comic book conventions - and writing, as a way to escape having to deal with real world solutions.<p> Inception, was enjoyable, although I did check my watch at times. However, I think it's biggest flaw was that we never connected with the characters beyond the superficial. Movies such as Inception, fill a void created by mindless entertainments - but I think it's popularity is magnified more by an absence of like minded fare as opposed to the overall greatness of its presentation.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:55 a.m. CST

    Yeah, something doesn't smell right...

    by Billyeveryteen

    Broken promises, lies, and a meager, snarky, very late review.<p>Kinda sad, really...

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:56 a.m. CST

    Red Ned

    by donchild

    To answer your questions (though I see Jackalcack has already beaten me to the punch with his similar explanation)the whole theme of heroism and what defines being a hero is very much the backbone of what TDK is all about for me anyway. If Batman & Gordon had of decided on the spot to pin Dent's crimes on The Joker or any of the criminal goons still on the streets then this would completely undermine the movie's driving message about heroism and what defines being a hero which can be simply summed up in one simple phrase 'self sacrifice'.It also resonates with the earlier scene in which Dent pretends to be Batman in order to take the rap for Batmans own crime (operating as a vigilante) for the same reason which is to stop The Joker. Any other story that didn't involve blaming a third party would take a bit of time to think up and as the cops were closing in fast, time was not what Batman & Gordon had. Thats not to say I thought TDK was spot on flawless, the explanation of who those five people were that Dent killed still lingers and will need addressing in the third film. Here's my theory on who they were , Wurtz, Maroni, Maroni's driver, bodyguard & the cop who goes to fetch Dent from his hospital room and takes a bullet from the Joker (nobody knows that The Joker was there). Also that ending creates one of the best set ups for a sequel ever, Batman being hunted by Gordon himself!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:56 a.m. CST

    "OH BOY!!!! THIS IS GRRRREAT!!!"

    by L.H.Puttgrass

    PRESIDENT BALTAR? <p> Again? <p> And no paragraphs? <p> Again? <p> Dude, like this: < p > But without the space between < and p. And without the space between p and >. <p> If you type it that way, it disappears and replaced with a paragraph spacing. <p> Like these.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 11:57 a.m. CST

    How does a movie pretend to be serious? I KNOW!

    by ufoclub1977

    Score it with big cellos and horns going full blast in a thunderous bass register, just blast em when you want to say, "This is important! This is grand! This is epic!" Do it frequently to make your film more serious and more emotional.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:02 p.m. CST

    Some action scenes in Inception suffered

    by ufoclub1977

    from the quickcut, shaky cam technique I first noticed in The Rock. I mean after The Road Warrior back in 1982 with it's solid action choreography... you can't make me feel a thrill by fast cutting bad choreography with fast cuts and shaking the image. Inception did this in the part with the cars and the shootout in the city. Everyone who is making a move right now. Don't do this anymore. Can you imagine how stupid the mine sequence with the demon towards the end of the first Lord of the Rings Movie would have been with fast cuts and shaky cam?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:04 p.m. CST

    And with this, a bazillion hipster geeks in the interwebs

    by PTSDPete

    Will jump on the bandwagon and simultaneously echo Harry's views here. Or hate on Harry.</p> Or something. </p>

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:07 p.m. CST

    it was well done...better than shutter

    by FleshMachine

    which gave away the ending way too soon...i though inception had too but it went a bit farther which i liked.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:07 p.m. CST

    Predictable.

    by PTSDPete

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:08 p.m. CST

    great films stick with you long after the lights come on...

    by FleshMachine

    most do not.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:10 p.m. CST

    Why does "not great" equal "hate?"

    by Bot-Bot

    So many talkbackers here have expressed liking but not loving the film, only to be chastised instantly and put into the "hate" category by the die-hard fans. Relax, it's just a movie! Inception is in my opinion the first full-length exposition film. There are precious few moments where what is going on is not described or explained by a character, which I suppose is necessary for this complex tale. Oddly enough, I didn't mind that aspect of it once I accepted that the film was going to use this technique throughout. What I did mind was a lack of connection with the main characters. Leonardo DiCaprio has not cracked a smile once in his last few films, playing essentially the same morose and tortured soul. He's competent, hits all the right beats, but I didn't feel for him. A famous actor once said that if you play out all your emotions too strongly, the audience is off the hook for feeling. That's how i felt about him. I loved Ellen Page, but she had less screen time than I would have wished for such a good performance. It's hard when you have to keep up with multiple characters in any film, but it makes it a marathon, if, like myself, I could not relate to a protagonist. For that, I was disappointed in the film. Technically well done, and certainly a labour of love for Nolan, but the guy has to warm up and get out of his labyrinth once in awhile. Please notice I didn't say I hated it. It was worth seeing.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:10 p.m. CST

    PRESIDENT BALTAR FOR PRESIDENT

    by bufordtannen

    OF THE WORLD! You said almost everything I was about to say, and now can't be bothered to say, except the following:- <p> Inception is the Matrix... It is the world that's been pulled over your eyes to blind you from the truth. What truth? Inception is dumb and not just sloppy - if you watched it again you'd realise you've been fooled by a pretentious filmmaker.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:12 p.m. CST

    Damn it! Where are my paragraphs?

    by Bot-Bot

    I put in the paragraph breaks in the last post - why does this stupid interface not accept them?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:13 p.m. CST

    I wish we could see a rundown of TBers favorite movies

    by mortsleam

    Like a little sidebar of stats next to your username with your top five movies, or a link to a page with ten to twenty reviews, just to give a sense of who you're talking to. It's sad that Facebook has better technology than this site. With all the Expendables money Harry's raking in, you'd think he could afford an upgrade.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:13 p.m. CST

    people should stop bringing up the box office for inception

    by spider_neil

    'inception was loved because it made a fortune' TF2 made a fortune as well, and whilst I not comparing the two you can't use box office as to a worth worth. TF2 - hit blade runner - flop

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:13 p.m. CST

    LORDOFLIGHT have you seen

    by bufordtannen

    "Waking life" - Linklater, "Mullholland Drive" - Lynch? <p> Both films capture the 'feel' of dreams. Well.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:15 p.m. CST

    donchild

    by TallanDagwood

    If I may presume to answer, I believe Nolan driving home the theme of the movie as you put it 'self sacrifice' is what calls into question his talents and a writer/director of the first rank. That is exactly what I was referring to in my post to Red Ned Lynch - the fact that Nolan would sacrifice good and logical storytelling for the sake of reinforcing his thematic narrative. <p> Batman did not need to accept the blame for the murders. Neither did Dent have to be blamed if it was the goal to cover-up (and how heroic is that?) his crimes. Joker could have easily been blamed, or it could have been left unresolved. <p>Eventually good detective work - assuming such exists in Gotham, would show that Batman could not have committed the murders. <p> Now of course, Batman could manufacture evidence to point to himself -but that would be even sillier than taking the fall needlessly. However that would definitely show a deep psychological scarring that demands a masochistic and self destructive bent, which would make ofr one helluva Batman movie - but I doubt Nolan was going for that.<p> As for Gordon pursuing Batman in the third movie whose theme will undoubtedly be that of redemption, how hard will Gordon really try, and even if he went all out - he still could not touch Batman -the man he relies on to solve the most difficult cases because he in incapable of doing so.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:24 p.m. CST

    Jackalcack does not exist in this dojo

    by Cobra--Kai

    Haha! Thanks dude.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:28 p.m. CST

    It's a Sunday...

    by WavingFlagsInSpace

    Gotta hand it to you, Harry. Posting your tepid review of a film some love, most like and few rabidly hate by one of the single most innovative filmmakers working today in mainstream cinema is one hell of a way to generate site traffic on what appears to be a very, very slow news day.<p>Lest we forget, this has now become a business for you, rather than a passion, because there sure was an absence of passion in the 'review' you wrote above...thank god for the talkbackers who fill this site with geniune feeling rather than your obvious ennui...

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:28 p.m. CST

    Baffling

    by Manatee

    I'm baffled that people still want artsy movies filled with self-indulgent wankery from Nolan. Then they are baffled when, instead of producing said wankery, he produces a tightly wound and thoroughly entertaining piece of Hollywood eye candy. You must repeat after me: Christopher Nolan is NOT P.T. Anderson. If you want sprawling character studies filled with dense complexity, you have P.T. Anderson. If you want entertaining, yet intelligent blockbusters, you have Christopher Nolan. We all love Memento; it was exquisite independent film-making of the highest order. But Nolan has moved to a larger canvas--don't resent him for it. The genius is still there, but in a more lavish and accessible form. Nolan understands the movie making process like no other director working today -- his technical expertise, from SFX to cross-cutting to pacing, is unrivaled (and probably why he draws comparisons to other technical masters, like Stanley Kubrick). But what Nolan gives you that other technical masters do not is the thematic oomph. Nolan is a true WRITER/DIRECTOR. He works in perfect balance with BOTH of those sensibilities. So instead of the writer giving us unfettered imagination in the dreamscapes of Inception, the director must keep things in check to ensure the journey remains somewhat accessible. Instead of the director focusing on overwhelming visual accomplishment, the writer insists every scene be in service to the narrative flow. Nolan, more than any other writer/director working today, perfectly balances these two disciplines. And he does so on a HUGE scale. Folks really need to stop criticizing the film they WANTED to see from Nolan and appreciate what the guy is actually producing. Just because people like something and it makes money, doesn't mean it isn't good. Sorry about the rant (and the ugly giant block--how do you put the frickin' spaces in?!?), but the litany of reviews complaining about the simplistic dreamscapes of Inception have finally pushed me over the edge.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:29 p.m. CST

    Shutter Island? Seriously?

    by Huckshine_Saints

    That movie played out in the first 5 minutes. The rest was just filler.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:31 p.m. CST

    Harry - I felt like that..UNTIL

    by misnomer

    I realised the whole movie mirrors our own dreaming. (i.e internal logic of dreams make sense when you're asleep but when you wake up that 'dream logic'is revealed to be nonsensical.) I was too busy thinking "how can this technology fit in a suitcase? it doesn't even attach to the guys head...why didn't nolan sell the believability of the technology more?" Then I realised a) nolan is a genius, he could've sold it more if he wanted to, so why didn't he? Then see above. That's my two cents AWESOME.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:32 p.m. CST

    ^^^and

    by misnomer

    forgot, that's why the ending is so perfect. Our own dreams don't have endings, they can only be interpreted.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:33 p.m. CST

    The Ski dream was Hardy's

    by charlesbronsonLIVES

    Eames was the third layer. Not Cillian Murphy's character. And as for the lack of research in the dream? if you'd paid attention Harry, you would have realized that it wasn't in the Architect's ability to create a girlfriend or anyone else. The people in the dream are filled in by the dreamer. Seriously man, i get being underwhelmed, but atleast pay attention.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:37 p.m. CST

    by more_like_LOSERname

    Mostly serious question: When people say that X person didn't like Inception because he or she "didn't get it", what exactly are you thinking that person didn't understand? Like what specific thing(s) are you guessing was totally lost on the folks who weren't crazy about this particular movie? Because 95% of Inception was characters explaining shit as it was happening on the screen. That was pretty much the whole movie. So for someone claiming Harry disliked it because he didn't understand something, what are you imagining he missed?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:37 p.m. CST

    also, the reason it was grounded

    by charlesbronsonLIVES

    was because the dreamer needed to believe this was real so that his subconscious didn't rip everyone apart once it felt it was being infiltrated. did you not pay attention at all? i understand that visually this film could have been a lot crazier with blue dragons and gravity defying sex scenes or whatever else you think is cool these days, but seriously Harry, go back and revisit this in a year or so and you'll see that you missed a whole lot of what made this film really work. i'm not in the camp of saying this is the best movie ever, i'm just saying that its a shame to compare this to all of your favorite films and then pick it apart without ever paying attention in the first place. but you dont read these after the first few so i'm sure i'm talking to no one.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:38 p.m. CST

    Not getting Inception

    by more_like_LOSERname

    Mostly serious question: When people say that X person didn't like Inception because he or she "didn't get it", what exactly are you thinking that person didn't understand? Like what specific thing(s) are you guessing was totally lost on the folks who weren't crazy about this particular movie? Because 95% of Inception was characters explaining shit as it was happening on the screen. That was pretty much the whole movie. So for someone claiming Harry disliked it because he didn't understand something, what are you imagining he missed?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:39 p.m. CST

    Harry

    by Colin62

    You've lost all credibility for all time. Never reading anything you write ever again.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:39 p.m. CST

    To be fair, Scott Pilgrim has a TERRIBLE ad campaign

    by D.Vader

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:39 p.m. CST

    To be fair, Scott Pilgrim has a TERRIBLE ad campaign

    by D.Vader

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:41 p.m. CST

    didn't "get" it at first

    by misnomer

    ..too busy keeping up with the narrative!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:42 p.m. CST

    To be fair, Scott Pilgrim has a TERRIBLE ad campaign

    by D.Vader

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:42 p.m. CST

    consider not reviewing anymore to calm TBers down

    by charlesbronsonLIVES

    seriously harry. you can't win with these people anymore. Especially giving half-thought out reviews to fan faves. you are really close to a lot of talented filmmakers and you always love their work (and don't say because you ragged on Predators that excuses you, Rodriguez didn't direct that film). Stallone and Wright both made fun movies, and yet you went batshit over them. I'm sure you'll do the same when Machete drops in a couple of weeks. How about you just leave the reviews to Capone and Quint and you run the site elsewhere. I used to love coming here to read yours and moriarity's reviews (ive been reading since 97 when i was in high school) but he lost his mind a while back and you seem to have lost to the lust for this. go make Famous Monsters great and keep up the work here, but don't feel the need to appease anyone with your "critiques" of movies anymore because all it does is remind everyone that you can't be part of it and successfully critique it. then again, what the fuck do i know? nothing.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:43 p.m. CST

    Damnit

    by D.Vader

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:46 p.m. CST

    Disliked INCEPTION but liked WOLFMAN

    by Logan_1973

    Credibility shot.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:47 p.m. CST

    Harry's totem is the double sided dildo from requiem for a dream

    by Johnny_Tuco

    You are a puppet to your own psyche. I mean serious, you sit out of watching Inception(too busy?!! Fuck you! You could of skipped reviewing Predators or Expendables(oh fuck don't get me started on that review!!! Btw have you removed Sly's cock from your mouth! Shit I'm soo mad I put a parenthesis within a parenthesis, how's that for Inception mofukka!!)for a whole month. I call bullshit sir!! First of all not every dream movie is goin to have bugnuts shit goin on. Just because you dream of Yoko's head on a unicorn while eating the worlds biggest jizz filled chocolate donut in the middle of a romulan/Vulcan war doesn't mean there aren't people who dream more grounded, you pompous jerk. WTF happened to you, in one year you gave a glowing review to Elm Street and now your "underwhelmed" by Nolan's masterpiece! Again WTF!! Cillian Murphy's character dreams this way in part because he is a business man and also because he's under the impression that he's in Tom Berenger's dream, so he's just projecting fear and daring danger. He's obviously scared at what he is doing. Cobb and the others know it's a sneaking mission so that's how they go about it, inception is a delicate process and if one of them started to "dream bigger,darling" , like of black shiny trench coats or fuggin zeus' lightning bolts than the mission would be compromised! WTF!!! What film were you watching?!!!!! Next time jus stay home and watch your precious Platinum Dunes' Freddy movie , and here's hoping fuggin Freddy Rorschach invades your nightmares and makes you watch Inception in limbo(that means forever, you ass!!!!!)

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:47 p.m. CST

    Horrible Review

    by Nealbee11

    Terrible. Inception was a breath of fresh air in this world of shitty, over used, over done ideas and remakes. I think people have forgotten what cinema is really all about, and Nolan hit it right on the head with Inception.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:50 p.m. CST

    Fantastic

    by Spunkmonkey

    Been wanting to watch this but been travelling and doing work etc. Been reading this site for 6+ yrs and only just started commenting but generally when Harry doesn't like it ... I do </p> <p> But equally no point having the hate for Harry. This is all a matter of taste. Some people like tiger print sofas. My tastes are more similar to McWeeneys whose loss to the site was huge imho </p> <p> Harry seems to like (with exceptions) superficial films. I'll watch them but I wont think about them afterwards </p>

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:52 p.m. CST

    Come on!

    by Batguy

    Can we let everyone have their opinions? No one is going to agree 100%. that being said, I fell under Inception's spell. I agree with the above poster who says it would be interesting to see what everyone else's tastes in movies are like. Here's my blog, if you like: believeamancanfly.wordpress.com ringwearer, as a trained composer I can say that the point of a film score isn't always to give you a hummable theme. It's to enhance the screen images, sound effects, or dramatic tension, among other things. It's not all John Williams-type stuff.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:53 p.m. CST

    Tallandagwood

    by donchild

    I see where you are coming from on the sacrificing of Logical storytelling for the sake of thematic conclusion point. However I still feel that for Batman & Gordon to come up with any other sort of explanation would seem really at odds with both their own moral codes (despite the fact that they are telling a lie about Batman)and wouldn't give the film that final cathertic kick that it gets as Batman rides off into the night even more of a hero than had he simply saved the city and reaped the respect of the people of Gotham. In the eyes of the audience (used to seein the standard hero saves the day ending) he leaves an indelible imprint of being a true hero. Had he and Gordon thought up some other story or blamed The Joker the movie would have lacked that strong conclusion and seemed contrived. With the next film the door has been opened for multiple possibilities, the fact that Gordon is chasing a man he knows to be innocent creates an interesting scenario in itself, I would love to see the hunt on Batman be carried out through an investigation into discovering his real identity, Gordon interrogating Bruce Wayne perhaps?

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:53 p.m. CST

    INVALID reasons to dismiss Harry's review

    by maxwell's hammer

    I actually disagree with Harry's overall assessment, but some of you are just being unreasonable. The following are invalid reasons to dismiss his review:<BR> <BR> 1) He slept through the movie therefore he didn't understand it: you dumbasses. He makes a rather lenghty explanation of how his first viewing was under less than ideal circumstances, so we waited until he'd had a chance to see it properly before reviewing it.<BR> <BR> 2) he waited too long to review it: you dumbasses. see explanation for #1. and those of you accusing him of lying about why he waited...I think its obvious even after a second viewing that Harry admits there's a lot going on in this film that is admirable that needed to sink in a bit. he just walked away with a different opinion than you did.<BR> <BR> 3) He didn't understand the rules of dream land: Yes, he did. The rules of dream invasion state that you shouldn't create weird surreal shit so as not to draw attention to the fact that its a dream. Okay. But once trains are barreling down the avenue and you're being chased into warehouses, off highway overpasses, and down blizzard infested ski-slopes, I think its safe to say that you don't have to worry about drawing attention to yourself anymore. Hardy's character explicitly says that to defend yourself properly, you should dream bigger, then pulls a rocket launcher out of thin air. he establishes that this is possible and even helpful to the situation. So why the fuck doesn't anyone else do this at any other point? Asking that question doesn't mean we didn't get the rules. it means we noticed a plot hole that isn't addressed!<BR> <BR> 4) Harry is fat.<BR> <BR> 5) You wish Harry would die some spectacular violent death.<BR> <BR> 6) Harry is insincere: if you honestly think that, you've obviously never read any of his reviews. Harry is sincere to the point of absurdity, which is why his reviews are much of the time unreliable. Quint and Massawyrm are the go-to guys if you want to here textually based pro's and con's. Harry is who you go to if you want raw unmitigated emotional vomit.<BR> <BR> In the end, its his opinion, and it disagrees with yours, and I'm not sure why some of you have to be so violently and obnoxiously vitriolic in responding to him.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:53 p.m. CST

    Inception is...

    by WavingFlagsInSpace

    ...on one level, a very brilliant metaphor for the filmmaking progress.<p>It can also be viewed as an examination of existential questions concerning the self.<p>It can also be viewed as a cracking action thriller.<p>It can also be viewed as all of the above.<p>Somehow, Harry, you managed to miss all of these. Go read the article posted on CHUD by Devin Faraci, titled 'Never Wake Up' (which you seemed to take literally, Harry) and read what a real film afficionado writes...

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:56 p.m. CST

    I am confused...

    by MonkeyManReturns

    I thought art was subjective...I thought we were allowed to express opinions...Harry didnt' think Inception was that great...so what...how does that affect your lives. I didn't think it was that great either. And the fact that many of you are praising it worries me because it futher shows how dumb you people are. You find intelligent, ideas that fairly simple to understand. Soon you will be praising how intelligent Alvin and the Chipmunks 3 is....because as a society, we have all dumbed down.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:57 p.m. CST

    Well said, Harry

    by Mazzer

    I sat through Inception hoping that I'd enjoy it more as the movie went on: it's SURELY going to be more visually imaginative when they get to the NEXT dream level. But no. Apart from a couple of set pieces, it didn't really impress either visually, conceptually, or through the characters. Some reviewers even compared it to Kubrick, but 2001 it ain't!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 12:59 p.m. CST

    Saw it this weekend. Overrated.

    by fiester

    Incredibly overrated. Man, I thought that friggin' van would never hit the water. Fragmenting the stories that much was not a really smart artistic choice. Also, and it's been said before but it's true, Nolan really sucks at shooting action scenes. The whole section set at the snow fortress was painful and tedious viewing. Some interesting Borgesian ideas at play, but ultimately just a string of missed opportunities with no really fine performances from any of the cast.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1 p.m. CST

    A small counterpoint to Harry's review

    by richievanderlow

    If you don’t like it or it doesn’t work for you, then that’s cool.. but for me it worked by not being too fantastical , because of an assumption I made before I ever saw it. I had seen enough promo material to not spoil this movie, but I also knew that Nolan chose to ground the dream world in reality for no other reason than what he tells Ariadne early in the movie. When you dream, you usually aren’t aware that you’re dreaming. You think it’s real, even when something seems strange. He wanted the audience to not distinguish a dream reality from actual reality in the film. That artistic choice is central to the story, and I felt he didn’t cop out by going overboard with effects for the sake of doing effects. He acted with an appropriate amount of restraint, I thought. So should he have done some more imaginative stuff? I suppose so, but it could have backfired as well.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:01 p.m. CST

    MonkeyManReturns

    by WavingFlagsInSpace

    Following your logic (ignoring opinions) would lead to the death of these talkbacks, and a major source of income for Harry's site.<p>Go wash out your keyboard with soap, because the big guy loves it when we rip his naivety to shreds...dollar signs probably light up his eyes.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:01 p.m. CST

    by duckbutter

    The one and only "realistic" dream sequence I've ever seen in a movie was in Rosemary's Baby. There's really not much to "get" about Inception. All of you claiming to "get" it more than others should go watch "Inland Empire" and then we can talk about your superior understanding of cinema.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:02 p.m. CST

    THIS Infographic sums up Harry's review.

    by Whimsical Guy

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/33248914@N00/4894206279/ A negative review is fine and good, but when it comes a month after the world at large is pushing it past $250 domestically and creating online communities...well...kinda silly.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:02 p.m. CST

    Cobra Kai

    by jackalcack

    Don't mention it squire, just keep on doing what you're doing!

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:11 p.m. CST

    by Batguy

    Don't get me wrong. I love discussing movies. The inane immaturity and attacks that occur here have ony gotten worse. It's pathetic. Go ahead...flame me. I welcome it. For those of you having civilized arguments, thank you for bringing something worthwhile to this forum.

  • Aug. 15, 2010, 1:13 p.m. CST

    duckbutter

    by WavingFlagsInSpace

    Or how about 'Primer'?<p>Or 'Synecdoche, New York'?<p>I'm sitting through 'Synecdoche...' for a third time to get a full handle on that challenge. Just added 'Inland Empire' to my 'lovefilm' list, thanks for the tip. </