Comics

AICN COMICS REVIEWS THE WALKING DEAD! JSA! X-FORCE! AND MORE!!!

Published at: May 5, 2010, 9:56 a.m. CST by ambush bug

#49 4/28/10 #8

Hey folks, Ambush Bug here. Got a short little column for y’all this week. But it’s better than nothin’! Enjoy!

The Pull List (Click title to go directly to the review) THE WALKING DEAD #71 JUSTICE SOCIETY OF AMERICA #38 X-FORCE #26 SUPERMAN: SECRET ORIGIN #5 SPIDER-MAN MARVEL ADVENTURES #1

THE WALKING DEAD #71

Writer: Robert Kirkman Art: Charlie Adlard Publisher: Image Comics Reviewer: Optimous Douche

There are many things I admire about Robert Kirkman. His ongoing support of indie comics in both words (remember his comic con manifesto) and deeds (two series now that have run for the past five years with nary a hiccup in production). His unique ability to drop minor plot seeds that he tends and germinates over time until they take on a life of their own (remember the garbage bags from INVINCIBLE). Most importantly though I admire his ability to rectify his past mistakes; WALKING DEAD #71 is the epitome of this attribute.
I came into WALKING DEAD late in the game. Zombies were never my bag, and I‘m embarrassed to say that I also gave this title the Heisman because the pages were sans color. I know, I’m a bad Optimous. Despite my reservations, it was almost impossible to ignore the cacophony of voices that praised this title. So on the day the tenth volume dropped, I picked up volume one. Two hours later I was back in my car zipping to the comic shop to pick up volumes two through nine. Later that week, I was buying up every single issue that had come out after the collected issues. I was officially a WALKING DEAD zombie.
Now, even though I wasn’t reading WALKING DEAD, I did keep up with the Internet chatter, being the conscious douche that I am. The only truly disparaging remarks I could ever find regarded something about time spent in a prison…too much time apparently. Once I dove into the trades, I couldn’t get what all of the fuss was about. Granted, it was a respite from the action, but it seemed appropriate if Kirkman was going to stay married to this title for the long haul. I then remembered how I was reading the title, and the stark difference of digesting a story in one sitting instead of painfully waiting month after month for it to appear on the comic shop shelves. Looking at “The Prison” in that light, I will say the time our living refugees spent in apocalypse arcadia was probably a little long, but not egregious.
Given this history, you can imagine the explosion of fanboy angst when our weary travelers found a fully functioning community of living human beings on the outskirts of Washington D.C. a few issues ago. Comments like, “Fuck me, more lessons in farming!” or “Oh good, everyone can start whining again” spread like wildfire across message boards and Web sites.
So, what’s changed this time that’s allowed me to stay out of this mire of bitching? This new sanctuary and specifically this issue have brought out a new evil in our central characters that I don’t think they’ll ever return from.
Again, I didn’t have a problem with the time spent in the prison. When dealing with an ongoing book there will always be ebbs and flows. Shit, we still haven’t forgiven the industry as a whole for the massive ebb known as the 90s. What I think Kirkman is doing differently this time, though, is that he’s moving the central characters forward. Things happened in prison, but the central characters barely changed. Rick and his wife were still Rick and his wife. A few folks died, but we didn’t really care about them anyway. No one really grew, they all just merely existed. Now, I will say when Rick’s wife died at the end of the arc, the malaise up until that point made her death all the more powerful and gut wrenching.
But let’s talk about the now. There were two key pages in this story that I believe signify the beginning of the end for this tale. All of the central WALKING DEAD characters crossed the line of sanity long ago; now they are passing the lines of morality as well. Some are going to call this shift out of character, to which I say poppycock. It’s merely the natural evolution of life after the apocalypse.
As omnipotent readers we know this “Stepford” town of creature comforts is hiding something. We’ve seen the conversations between the town’s founders that allude to skullduggery beneath the surface. Our heroes, however, don’t know this, which makes Rick’s character choice at the end of this issue all the more unsettling. Up until this point Rick has always been the bedrock of optimism. Even in the wake of losing a limb, he has always held to the tenets of the society that once was if for no other reason than to be a role model for his son Carl. Now it seems Rick is no longer content to play by the old rules; in the final word balloon Kirkman shifted Rick from protector to conqueror. Perhaps I’m reading too much into things, but I don’t think so. If (when) the shit hits the fan, there is going to be a shift in power, not an abandonment of the town all together.
The rest of this issue explores Carl’s loss of innocence and the fact this kid is going to be a whole bucket of neurosis in the coming years. Yes, Kirkman even elevated a scuffle between two children to palpable danger and dramatic tension. But I guess even in the real world when kids fight over a loaded weapon there should be pause for concern.
I really do believe this is the beginning of the end. Even if the universe is able to persist, Rick has just stepped on to a dark path that I can only see leading to a new ruling class or an abyss of darkness that he will not be able to crawl out of.
Optimous is lonely and needs friends. Even virtual ones will fill the gaping hole, join him on Facebook or he will cry like a newborn kitten.

JUSTICE SOCIETY OF AMERICA #38

Writer: Bill Willingham Art: Jesus Merino Publisher: DC Comics Reviewer: BottleImp

You know the great thing about Nazis? They make the perfect villains. You always want their schemes to fail and for the protagonists to beat them into a bloody pulp. And there’s no way that you can be forced into feeling any pity or sympathy for them… ‘cause they’re Nazis. Seriously, the only villains that might, might have a tiny edge above Nazis are killer robots, and the only reason for that is because the heroes can smash the robots until they’re reduced to Erector set pieces and the audience can revel in this wanton destruction without the twinge of uneasiness about our own bloodlust that comes when we take savage joy in the old ultra-violence of a flesh-and-blood villain getting the shit kicked out of him. So yes, Nazis are pretty much awesome when it comes to villains to hate.
Therefore it comes as no surprise that the current plot of JSA is a Nazi-hating good time. Willingham is adeptly using that old comic book and science fiction standby of the Dystopian Future—twenty years from now, the American Reich has found a way to neutralize super-powered beings and has taken control of the entire world. The heroes who remain are slowly being executed one by one by the Nazi regime under the command of Jeremy Karnes, aka Kid Karnevil, a Willingham creation from his SHADOWPACT series and a featured player in recent issues of JSA. Karnes was introduced as a sadistic, amoral psychopath who liked nothing better than to inflict pain, so this latest incarnation as the American Reich’s new Hitler is the perfect culmination of the character’s previous appearances. Willingham does a good job in this issue of balancing plot exposition—the whys and wherefores of how the Nazis ended up in charge—with the storyline’s momentum. The plot has been a “fill in the blanks” situation that threw the reader directly into the Nazi-ruled future, so having Mr. Terrific relate the history of the past two decades to his interrogator works well to bring the reader up to speed while still advancing the plot. Merino’s artwork remains a good fit with the writing; his work is nothing flashy or groundbreaking, but his drawing skills are tight and his compositions keep the visual flow of the story moving nicely without any confusion.
I do have a couple of quibbles with this comic, mostly about the writing. Though I like Willingham’s plots, sometimes he tends to get a little too wordy, especially when it comes to using narrative captions. Comics are a visual medium, after all, so I’ve always felt that the “show, don’t tell” mantra should be respected. Now in this issue’s case, I can forgive most of the narrative text, since the history leading up to the Nazi regime needs to be told to the reader, but I’ve seen how easily Willingham falls into the trap of over-dependency on those little letter-packed boxes. Just look at the two-issue Dr. Fate/Mordru “filler” story from a few months back and you’ll see what I mean. My other nitpick is that many of the Justice Society’s members are getting the short shrift in terms of facetime. Part of the blame for this can be leveled at Geoff Johns and Alex Ross for loading the team up with waaaay too many members (a new Mr. America, for christsake?), and this sprawling roll call was alleviated in some respects by dividing the Society between the JSA and JSA ALL-STARS titles, but I still get the sense that Willingham has more characters than he knows what to do with. That leads to things like the current storyline, where Mr. Terrific is the only JSA member to be featured and the supporting cast is rounded out by Superman, Batman and Blue Beetle, and the fact that Obsidian is once again used as a plot device rather than as a fully-rounded character, being the inexplicable power source of the machine which robs superhumans of their abilities. These are small, nagging negativities that pop up while I’m reading and don’t do too much to detract from the overall quality, but my opinion is that Willingham needs to address these issues and not fall into the same rut that he did with the aforementioned SHADOWPACT, a series that ended up collapsing under the weight of its own boredom.
For now, though, I’m on board with Willingham and Merino and the rest of the JSA crew, and looking forward to next month’s issue to see if those dirty Nazis finally get the bone-crushing, back-breaking, testicle-stomping beatdown that they so justly deserve.
When released from his Bottle, the Imp takes the form of Stephen Andrade, an artist/illustrator/pirate monkey painter from the Northeast. You can see some of his artwork here. He’s given up comics more times than he can remember. But every time he thinks he's out, they pull him back in.

X-FORCE #26

Writers: Craig Kyle & Chris Yost Artists: Mike Choi & Sonia Oback Publisher: Marvel Comics Reviewer: KletusCasady

HOLY SHIT!!!! That’s what I say almost every issue of this fucking comic and this ish is no different. Whether it’s Wolverine grating people’s faces into cleanly cut lunchable type slices, X-23 going medieval on a group of guards after they’re doused in that trigger scent, the resurrection of a certain apocalyptic figure who showed his wide mouthed self in SHIELD #1 (you have to look close but he’s there), or this issue where {blank} gets {blanked} through the {blank}. I wasn’t really into the Necrotia stuff because I thought it was kind of a knock off “Blackest Night” (even though the ending to that gave me a “meh”) plus I’m not really into Clayton Crain’s art work. Some stuff looks cool but for the most part I can’t fucking see anything; everything’s so dark, not to mention peoples’ heads look kind of disproportionate to their bodies, but I digress. This comic is fun and always has me drooling for that Holy SHIT moment every week.
I know some people don’t like all this X-Men crossover stuff but to me it makes sense. Not to long ago mutants were a force to be reckoned with. There were tons of them and most of them were pretty capable of handling any flesh bag such as ourselves; mutants were feared and somewhat respected because people didn’t want to be filleted by some kid that could turn you into a sardine with a simple gesture. Now, the mutant numbers are scarce and they pretty much have to band together or be systematically picked off by any number of evil forces with an unlimited supply of hater-aid. Basically I don’t believe these crossovers are forced, it’s really just a natural progression of mutants trying stick together to live. One crossover I didn’t really like was the “Messiah War”, mostly because nothing really happened except for the resurrection of said wide mouthed immortal with help from another resident bad ass with metal wings ( I like to be vague). This issue continues the story of Hope returning to the present time and all the hoopla surrounding this. I like this issue because even though this is tied into a larger story Kyle & Yost still manage to make this feel like a regular issue of X-Force while seamlessly tying into larger story. The members of X-Force are their usually badass selves but they get a lot less face time, but that’s to be expected with all these X-teams interacting and working together on different fronts in order to keep Hope safe. Speaking of Hope, please don’t make her Jean Grey…let her stay dead at least for another decade, plus wouldn’t it be weird if Cyclops’s son raised his reincarnated wife from a baby only to have her grow older and remarry her surrogate father’s father thus making her, her own surrogate granddaughter (I think that’s how it would work…shit makes my head hurt). This issue will please X-Force fans but you’d obviously have to be reading the entire story line to get the full effect of {blank} getting {blanked} through the {blank}. I love Choi & Oback’s artwork; its so smooth looking I feel like it should be for video game or something. It’s like Clayton Crain if he gave up the black eye shadow, wallet chain, and big Jencos and adopted a cleaner emo life style draped in the latest tight jeans, v-neck ensemble. What I mean is Choi & Oback’s artwork is very similar to Crain’s but its clearer, cleaner, and because the colors are more diverse, you can actually see what the fuck is going on in a panel. The one thing I do like about Crain is that his gore (sooo much of it in X-Force and I love it!) is rendered pretty well and looks pretty cool in some places…but Choi & Oback always look good all of the time.
Man I like this comic, its really hard to get an audible unplanned verbal reaction from me with a comic (in regular life too as I tend to mumble a lot) but I swear X-FORCE has hit me upside the head with shit I wasn’t expecting in at least 12 or so issues out of the 26 that are currently out. I also am a fan of 2/3 of the X-crossovers that have happened recently and I feel like they have more of an organic feel to them than some crossovers (I looked at you with squinty eyes DC…I love DC but damn if they don’t shove an event down your throat and up your ass simultaneously). The artwork is great when Choi & Oback are on the case but Crain on the case is like Matlock trying to solve a mystery in the dark( I don’t know just roll with it!). I do think that Crain is kind of acquired taste because there’s a guy I work with who loves X-FORCE and Crain’s art as well so what do I know. I think X-FORCE is ending soon (I think its coming back with a new creative team) but if it does end pick up the trades cause this shit is a wild face-slicing, blood splattered, Wizard of Gore type of fun ride, so get on and hold tight…that’s a weak ending…how about grab your clean undies bub and watch for the SNIKT!

SUPERMAN: SECRET ORIGIN #5

Writer: Geoff Johns Artist: Gary Frank Publisher: DC Comics Reviewer: William Now THIS is how you do a comic book. Great story, exposition, action, artwork, teaser as to what’s to happen within the next issue. If the best qualities in a comic book can be placed into one issue, this is the model that should be followed.
I’ve been following this series ever since it first started, being such a huge Superman fan. Knowing that it’s been quite a few times that the Superman origin has been rehashed by DC, it was still surprising to see how refreshing everything still feels. Geoff Johns has been able to take into account all of the previous incarnations of the Superman mythos and incorporate them into a well adjusted mesh here. None of it feels repetitive, but rather is more like a different look at the same side of the coin, so to speak.
This issue deals with Lex Luthor essentially declaring a personal vendetta against Superman. Knowing that the “alien” is slowly (but surely) stealing the spotlight from him, and still very skeptical about his true intentions, Luthor decides to enlist the help of Sergeant John Corben in order to bring the Man of Steel down. Designing a specially built suit of armor for Corben, and combining it with the Kryptonite that Luthor now knows can harm Superman, it’s up to the Man of Steel to stop this attack while simultaneously keeping his image clean from an ever-mistrusting public.
What I’ve loved about this series is how “real” Johns has kept the world around Superman. I liked the idea that when the public is first introduced to a man who can literally fly at supersonic speeds, lift entire buildings, shoot lasers out of his eyes and so on, they seemed frightened of him at first. This is something that I felt was missing from the Donner movies. Despite the number of times that Superman can show he’s here to help, it’s only natural to assume that anyone who can lift mountains with the ease of an afterthought is to be feared. I especially liked Johns’ angle with the US Government, and how in this issue General Lane (Lois’s father) decides to “interrogate” him in order to find out why he’s truly here. No doubt if someone like Superman truly visits Earth one day, after seeing all of his fantastical feats the President of the United States would on the one hand gladly welcome him as an adopted son of this country, while on the other prepare immediate contingency plans should he ever decide to go rogue. Johns has also kept Luthor’s rise to power very real too, keeping the notion alive that Luthor’s empire derives from both a mixture of his business, social and technological savvy. No stupid “mad scientist” mantra involved here. Luthor is a ruthless businessman first, a scientist a close second. How Johns represents him is how I believe Luthor is at his finest.
The artwork by Gary Frank--what can I say except that he remains the BEST Superman artist around? What Jim Lee was to X-Men, what McFarlane was to Spider-Man, Gary Frank is to Superman. His beautiful nod to Christopher Reeve works very well in his portrayal of Superman. I especially like how he draws his Clark Kent, as the reader is literally staring at Christopher Reeve from the Donner movies. Lois Lane has never looked so hot as well. Frank definitely knows how to draw his women, and when he places Lois in some short skirts and shows off her sexy legs, is it any wonder Superman finds her so attractive?
I highly recommend this issue (and in essence this series) for any Superman or comic book fan in general. And it only looks to be better from here as no doubt Bizarro, Batman, Metallo, etc., all still have a part to play in it.

SPIDER-MAN MARVEL ADVENTURES #1

Writer: Paul Tobin Artist: Matteo Lolli Publisher: Marvel Comics Reviewer: Johnny Destructo

I was blissfully unaware that this new #1 was just a continuation of the previous series, and was impressed that it just threw the reader into the story and even introduced a new character who was Peter's love interest: Sophia Sanduval. I dug it that they didn't feel the need to throw everything at the reader all at once! Turns out, I'm dumb. A quick Google search cleared up the fact that this was all coming from the previous MARVEL ADVENTURES SPIDER-MAN series and that the crumbled relationship between Gwen and Peter, Pete's new girlfriend who also knows his identity....all that stuff was just a continuation. Aaand my interest immediately began to plummet. I was excited about a new Spidey continuity that was having its way with the storylines a la the “Spectacular Spider-Man” cartoon (which is fantastical, btw. You should be watching it) and that I was getting in on the ground floor. Then I was bummed to discover that I was getting in on the FIFTH floor.
But I shouldn't let any of that detract from my initial experience of the book, which was really positive. The dynamic cover shows the potential buyer that the story is going to be taking place with a teen Peter Parker doing the nerdy high-schooler bit, and the art inside got the job done (though truth be told, the faces and hair were all a bit too cartoony, while the Spidey action stuff was pretty awesome). The story has Spider-Man tracking down and systematically annoying the Torino crime family, as well as a crooked judge who's been on the take from them for awhile, in exchange for letting made men walk.
The book doesn't talk DOWN to kids, like so many other all ages books I've flipped through. An adult can and should check this title out if they're Spidey fans. It rides the line between the 616 Spidey and the Ultimate Spidey stuff. It's adult enough to be a solid read for adults while not trying too hard to be hip. I'm definitely curious to read more about the relationship between Pete and Sophia; it's nice to have a Peter that's having a relationship with someone OTHER then Betty, Gwen or MJ (my fave bit in USM was when he was dating Kitt;, I love when they let Spidey explore the other females of the Marvel U.)
Adults, don't be scared by the ALL AGES tag on this book. Check it out--if you like Spidey, chances are, you'll dig this!
Though I'm already tired of reading the word "Gwenterviews". Gah.

Editing, compiling, imaging, coding, logos & cat-wrangling by Ambush Bug Proofs, co-edits & common sense provided by Sleazy G


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Readers Talkback

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  • May 5, 2010, 10 a.m. CST

    okidoki

    by theDannerDaliel

  • May 5, 2010, 10:01 a.m. CST

    is that how they are doing the spider-man reboot?

    by theDannerDaliel

    swinging with a backpack on? I hope not....

  • May 5, 2010, 10:16 a.m. CST

    the walking dead

    by barryallen77

    greatest ongoing comic ever. greatest zombie story ever

  • May 5, 2010, 10:19 a.m. CST

    Preacher movie?

    by Xphile69

    Is it every going to happen?

  • May 5, 2010, 10:21 a.m. CST

    I can believe WD Rick and his son have gone "Wild"

    by cookylamoo

    but it's hard to believe that the people in Washington haven't gone the same route. I mean, they must have seen some bad times.

  • May 5, 2010, 10:24 a.m. CST

    Pretty short review list this week.

    by rev_skarekroe

    Is everyone on vacation?

  • May 5, 2010, 10:30 a.m. CST

    Btw, Last Week's FF and Iron Man Were Really Good

    by LaserPants

    Especially the FF. Maybe Marvel isn't completely artistically bankrupt after all.

  • May 5, 2010, 10:33 a.m. CST

    Walking Dead

    by Joenathan

    My problem was never the length of time spent in the prison, its that... sometimes... Kirkman has a tendency to have his characters "speechify" at each other: "You see, Rick blah, blah, blah, blah..." Huge bubbles where these fuckers painstakingly explain themselves to each other. Monologuing. It's the most unrealistic dialogue ever. <br><br>Also, I bet if Kirkman could take back that manifesto, he would. If he could go back and think for a second, he wouldn't have posted it. It was just such an ill conceived internet screed. Especially since most of the big creators he was targeting actually DID have their own personal projects and the ones who didn't, weren't interested. Like a bunch of independantly created superhero books was going to drive Little Johnny Lollipop back into the LCSs across the nation in droves... (rolls eyes). It just came out as sour grapes since ONLY his creator owned stuff has been any good and all of his Marvel stuff (except Destroyer... well, until the end) all failed horribly.

  • May 5, 2010, 10:35 a.m. CST

    Laserpants

    by Joenathan

    agreed. I think the war of the four cities is going to be pretty cool. But I always have a bit of a problem with Tony's (once again) public annoucement of no more weapons and then he turns around and creates the most powerful personal weapon platform in the history of ever.

  • May 5, 2010, 10:44 a.m. CST

    " as McFarlane was to Spider-Man", William?

    by Star Hump

    Come now. McFarlane? How about, what Ditko was to Spider-Man, or John Romita. McFarlane will never be regarded as a great artist, let alone a definitive Spider-Man artist.

  • May 5, 2010, 10:46 a.m. CST

    YOU MUST NOT MISS IT!!! (wholesale jordans )

    by jordancheap

    http://www.jordaner.com WE ACCEPT PYAPAL PAYMENT YOU MUST NOT MISS IT!!! free shipping come best quality guarantee!! (jordan shoes) (wholesale jordans ) ( authentic jordans) (cheap jordans) (Jordan running shoes) best quality guarantee!! Safty & honesty guarantee!! Fast & prompt delivery guarantee!! lower price fast shippment with higher quality

  • May 5, 2010, 10:47 a.m. CST

    I don't know...

    by Joenathan

    I wasn't a fan, but there was definately a McFarlane era of Spider-man that heavily influenced the character for years.

  • May 5, 2010, 10:56 a.m. CST

    NO GOLLY REVIEW!!

    by Series7

    BALLS TO YOU!!! I haven't actually read it yet, so I don't know if its good or not.

  • May 5, 2010, 11 a.m. CST

    YOU MUST NOT MISS IT!!! (wholesale jordans )

    by jordancheap

    http://www.jordaner.com WE ACCEPT PYAPAL PAYMENT YOU MUST NOT MISS IT!!! free shipping come best quality guarantee!! (jordan shoes) (wholesale jordans ) ( authentic jordans) (cheap jordans) (Jordan running shoes) best quality guarantee!! Safty & honesty guarantee!! Fast & prompt delivery guarantee!! lower price fast shippment with higher quality

  • May 5, 2010, 11:15 a.m. CST

    McFarlane

    by WarrenSmooth

    was not only a DEFINITIVE Spider-Man artist... he was the DEFINITIVE artist of his era. McFarlane is a conceited douchebag but he changed comics forever... just like Ditko, Byrne, and Kirby. It kinda sucks but it's true.

  • May 5, 2010, 11:18 a.m. CST

    Ultimate Spider-Man is turning into Power Rangers.

    by SteadyUP

    http://tinyurl.com/2c6oncy

  • May 5, 2010, 12:11 p.m. CST

    Good Points Joen

    by optimous_douche

    I look at Kirkman same way I look at Smith, as readers we need to know what we're getting into.<p> Wordy, hellz yes. But personally I like it (OK not all the time with Smith but Kirkman yes).<P> Someone posted above "who talks like that." I guarantee if Television goes away the art of conversation will make a come back big time.

  • May 5, 2010, 12:21 p.m. CST

    I didn't say I didn't "like it"

    by Joenathan

    Ihave every single issue in the pamphlet. I just roll my eyes every time someone like fucking Dale or whoever has to explain... at great length... why he's upset... again. AND, I probably wouldn't notice as much if he just broke up some of those bubbles with someone else talking. Like a little more back and forth... like a conversation instead of a soliloquy.

  • May 5, 2010, 12:23 p.m. CST

    Easy Now

    by optimous_douche

    Never said you didn't like it.<p> I always add the "I like it" when talking about wordy writers since so many folks don't.<p> I'm still holding to my theory though. I think we would see the return of longer talking and less back and forth if we didn;t have so many entertainment diversions out there.

  • May 5, 2010, 12:36 p.m. CST

    they cancelled Spectacular Spider-Man

    by RealDoubleJ

    that's right, probably the most awesome Spider-man cartoon ever made with actual balls-to-the=wall spidey fights & they canned it. Wolverine & The X-Men? same re-invigorating twists to familiar stories that make you go "this is why i love comics" that's gone too. But fear not! At least we get another series of the wanktastically bad CGI-fest that is Iron Man Armored Adventures (curse you teenage Tony Stark!!)

  • May 5, 2010, 12:36 p.m. CST

    I missed that part

    by Joenathan

    You're saying ONCE Televission goes away? Hmmm... well, I probably wouldn't bank too much on that...<br><br>It's not so much the amount of words as the way they are used. Unrealistic dialogue, I think, is a definite downside of the book.

  • May 5, 2010, 12:49 p.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by rev_skarekroe

    Kirkman did the first couple of Marvel Zombies series, which were pretty damn big successes.<p>Which is not to say I like him very much. I gave up on Walking Dead after I realized Kirkman has all the subtlety of a sledgehammer ("WE ARE THE WALKING DEAD!!").

  • May 5, 2010, 12:56 p.m. CST

    I've never understood the prison hate in WD

    by gooseud

    Honestly, I'm baffled. If I had never read the interwebz and realized people were pissy about it, I might never have thought twice about it myself. Its a story arc. Some are long, some short, some action packed, some quieter. It happens. It all paid off in spades at the end, so WTF is the problem? And for those who say Kirkman isnt subtle, I suppose that is true in spots, but there are plenty of other moments where he downplays things more then you would expect. I dunno, I think that book is genius, but that is just one guy's opinion. Honestly, if they hadn't switched to Adlard and his mediocre artwork, I would say this book would be going down amongst the greats of all time.

  • May 5, 2010, 12:59 p.m. CST

    Rev

    by Joenathan

    You're right, those were successful, but can they be considered quality or are they more like a joke series? They certainly weren't serious... but that's subjective. Either way, yeah, I forgot about those. I didn't forget about the three or four titles that followed though. They failed.

  • May 5, 2010, 1 p.m. CST

    Goose

    by Joenathan

    I agree with you about the Prison. I had no problem with that storyline. Although remember the fight between Rick and the guy that got beheaded? Speechifying... big time.

  • May 5, 2010, 1:15 p.m. CST

    The prison arc.

    by Ambush Bug

    I think OD hit the nail on the head with his thoughts on the proson arc. I read it in monthly format, and I believe that was a time where there were quite a few delays. Add to the fact that there were quite a lot of downtime issues building to the big blow up, and I think the story read longer than it really was. I haven't reread it, but I'll bet in one sitting it is a much more fulfilling read. But I lack the control to wait for trade for WALKING DEAD. I just can't help it.

  • May 5, 2010, 2:07 p.m. CST

    The Tyreese/Rick fight

    by gooseud

    was one of the more shocking WD moments ever, and the first glimpse that Rick might have some potential to get a little wonky. I mean, regardless of the morality of the issue, its safe to say Rick overreacted, and Tyreese really tried his best to be cool about the whole thing. The thing I remember about it was how holier-then-thou douchebaggy Rick was even AFTER the fight, that was around the time of the speculation that Kirkman was going to kill off Rick and make Tyreese the leader of the group.

  • May 5, 2010, 3:11 p.m. CST

    McFarlane

    by fiester

    He was a big deal back in the day: biggest comic book artist in the world and his name sold books. I don't see how you can say he was not influential or representative of that time--even if he is a major douchebag fuckhead no one really cares for.

  • May 5, 2010, 3:58 p.m. CST

    MA Spidey

    by Hedgehog000

    MA Spidey has been consistently interesting since they went to the continuing story arc. I like that he's a kid. I like that I recognize the character but that he's not locked into the same continuity that gets repeated again and again.

  • May 5, 2010, 4:01 p.m. CST

    McFarlane

    by Hedgehog000

    He was certainly influential. He sold off the charts, and I certainly thought a lot of his artwork had an incredible over the top coolness to it. Was he a great artist? I'd vote no as I thought his work was too "posed" and hyper stylized, but that's just my taste.

  • May 5, 2010, 4:05 p.m. CST

    McFarlane Style

    by optimous_douche

    Posing this as a question because while I have a stance it's shaky at best.<p> Is he really a good artist or merely good at one thing?<p> I look at his cover work on HAUNT and truly believe he can only draw like three character types.

  • May 5, 2010, 5:15 p.m. CST

    Please write more reviews

    by Jaka

    The sum of all the books the @$$holes read each week has got to be far greater than the number of reviews they post. Not asking for a review of everything you guys read. But more would definitely be appreciated. It leads to some good conversations most weeks.

  • May 5, 2010, 6:12 p.m. CST

    Walking Dead...plus my mini review of Deadpool

    by Homer Sexual

    I have read all the Walking Dead and now that my sleeve is done and I can't read it free at the tattoo shop, I'm buying the trades. I can't imagine reading single issues, since it takes barely any time to blow through an entire trade. <p> I think Walking Dead is a bit over-rated, but it is definitely a great read. I felt the early issues were very heavy handed, and somewhat sexist. I didn't mind the prison arc, except that I found the Governor to be a retarded character. I know some people like that... and some people like Arseface and Ennis' writing on The Boys. But it's too "shocking" and adolescent for me. <p> I really enjoyed the later issues, especially. It seems like the book may have an actual ending. Some of the newer characters are awesome, and killing some major characters, if not the MAIN character, definitely gives it some edge. And while I hate B&W comics, zombie books (and movies) are much creepier in B&W, color makes them less scary to me. <p> And, what no one asked for... my thoughts on Deadpool, comic of the week last week, IMHO. <p> I never warmed up to Deadpool. Didn't think he was funny, or very original. but a co-worker lent me the storyline when he wants to joing the X-Men, and whaddayaknow, it was funny and fresh. So I kept buying it. I also bought Deadpool Team-Up and Merc With a Mouth. <p> I have dropped Team-Up, and Merc with a Mouth I buy because the art is just awesome. While I love Dr. Betty, the Zombie Deadpool Head is very tired and I may drop that book, too, if this drags on much longer. <p> Hit Monkey was not funny or entertaining to me. Just kind of boring. I began to question if I just jumped on the Deadpool bandwagon because my friends all like to read that book (not that they buy it. I buy it, they read it). <p> So, anyway, after feeling kind of bored with Deadpool, this issue brought me back into the fold. All cylinders were firing this month. Hillbillies make for some amusing foils to Deadpool, and White Lightnin' was a great character. The story moved right along and the dialogue, both internal and external, was witty. My only caveat is that the ending is pretty obvious (and a big favority ending in Jonah Hex as well). But that's just a quibble. <p> If you are one of the few readers who hasn't picked up an issue of Deadpool, this is the one I recommend. It is a self-contained story that requires no familiarity with the book or character, but it is still reflective of the tone of the series and will please new fans and longtime readers, something not that many books can accomplish. Pick it up!

  • May 5, 2010, 6:12 p.m. CST

    Walking Dead...plus my mini review of Deadpool

    by Homer Sexual

    I have read all the Walking Dead and now that my sleeve is done and I can't read it free at the tattoo shop, I'm buying the trades. I can't imagine reading single issues, since it takes barely any time to blow through an entire trade. <p> I think Walking Dead is a bit over-rated, but it is definitely a great read. I felt the early issues were very heavy handed, and somewhat sexist. I didn't mind the prison arc, except that I found the Governor to be a retarded character. I know some people like that... and some people like Arseface and Ennis' writing on The Boys. But it's too "shocking" and adolescent for me. <p> I really enjoyed the later issues, especially. It seems like the book may have an actual ending. Some of the newer characters are awesome, and killing some major characters, if not the MAIN character, definitely gives it some edge. And while I hate B&W comics, zombie books (and movies) are much creepier in B&W, color makes them less scary to me. <p> And, what no one asked for... my thoughts on Deadpool, comic of the week last week, IMHO. <p> I never warmed up to Deadpool. Didn't think he was funny, or very original. but a co-worker lent me the storyline when he wants to joing the X-Men, and whaddayaknow, it was funny and fresh. So I kept buying it. I also bought Deadpool Team-Up and Merc With a Mouth. <p> I have dropped Team-Up, and Merc with a Mouth I buy because the art is just awesome. While I love Dr. Betty, the Zombie Deadpool Head is very tired and I may drop that book, too, if this drags on much longer. <p> Hit Monkey was not funny or entertaining to me. Just kind of boring. I began to question if I just jumped on the Deadpool bandwagon because my friends all like to read that book (not that they buy it. I buy it, they read it). <p> So, anyway, after feeling kind of bored with Deadpool, this issue brought me back into the fold. All cylinders were firing this month. Hillbillies make for some amusing foils to Deadpool, and White Lightnin' was a great character. The story moved right along and the dialogue, both internal and external, was witty. My only caveat is that the ending is pretty obvious (and a big favority ending in Jonah Hex as well). But that's just a quibble. <p> If you are one of the few readers who hasn't picked up an issue of Deadpool, this is the one I recommend. It is a self-contained story that requires no familiarity with the book or character, but it is still reflective of the tone of the series and will please new fans and longtime readers, something not that many books can accomplish. Pick it up!

  • May 5, 2010, 8:26 p.m. CST

    Aint it Walking Dead News

    by WickedJacob

    Not that I mind, but this is like the 3rd WD related article in 24 hours.

  • May 6, 2010, 9:56 a.m. CST

    Also this TB is dead...

    by Homer Sexual

    I mean, it's Thurday and there's barely any posts. Not indicating lots o'excitement. <p> Regarding X-Force, I like the art, but the lettering is so hard to read...sometimes I have to skip word balloons that are black with red lettering because I really just can't read them. <p> New Ultimates 2 came out yesterday, and I thought it was very entertaining, but probably too much gender politics, which seems to be a trait of Loeb stories that prominently feature Barda. Much better than the first issue, though. <p> DV8... I felt the new book was very similar to the old one, for better and for worse. I was hoping Freestyle was dead or something, because when she appeared is when DV8 got worse. Also, Bliss seems pretty one-dimensional at this point: She's Empath in a girl form. The old series made her more complicated over time, and hopefully she'll develop more. So far "good" DV8 and"bad" DV8 are too predictable, with good/bad Wolverine, oops I mean Evo, straddling the line.

  • May 6, 2010, 9:59 a.m. CST

    Of course I meant Zarda..

    by Homer Sexual

    Not Barda, but you can see it's an easy mistake. My bad.

  • May 6, 2010, 10:58 a.m. CST

    Preacher

    by Autodidact

    Man, it's been years since I read any Preacher comics. That's one comic that at one point I had every issue of, and over the years from people borrowing my shit and not giving it back, I now have exactly one preacher comic: the very last issue.

  • May 6, 2010, 11:08 a.m. CST

    Walking Dead... Art... Colour vs B&W

    by Autodidact

    I really liked the style of the first artist on Walking Dead. His stuff was verging on a bit too "energetic" in the line style, but it was carefully drawn and detailed, and he was very meticulous and somewhat traditional in the use of cross-hatching and zipa-tone. This Charlie Adler guy, although not a "bad" artist, appears to take all of ten minutes in drawing some pages. Don't get me wrong, it kinda works for the material. Occasionally he'll take his time and draw something in a more "professional" way. Usually a zombie. I draw, I know how long shit takes and a style that loose can be done with a fucking sharpie for 80% or more of the page. Not that there's anything wrong with it. Just I preferred the first guy whose stuff merited more than a passing glance. <p> Colour can work in a zombie comic. It's just got to be stylistic or done with appropriate attention to lighting. Would take a helluva lot of work, certainly more effort than Charlie Adler puts into his art, which doesn't fucking merit colour.

  • May 6, 2010, 11:12 a.m. CST

    Zombies

    by Autodidact

    At least Walking Dead gets the concept that, for many "fans of zombies", it's more about the end of life as we know it than the zombies themselves. I seriously wouldn't mind seeing a zombie movie with no zombie attacks and nobody dying. I just like the setting of being in a zombie apocalypse. You know shit ain't going back to normal. But the basic infrastructure of modern life is still there. It's fertile ground for storytelling. You don't need to have people getting their brains eaten all the time. At least, I don't.

  • May 6, 2010, 11:22 a.m. CST

    McFarlane Good At One Thing.. He's No Art Adams

    by Autodidact

    McFarlane's got a lot of talent, but his style is fairly one-note. He stood out in the late 80s for his radical stylization amidst all the John Byrne clones drawing for Marvel at the time who mostly tried to Draw Comics The Marvel Way. I always preferred Art Adams, who had discipline to go with his radical stylization, while it seemed McFarlane's style was more about persistence and boldness. <p>For my money, Art Adams is the definitive X-Men artist. Too bad he only ever did a couple annuals, and a long run of covers for Classic X-Men.

  • May 6, 2010, 11:31 a.m. CST

    That Wolverine sorta-crucifixion cover...

    by Jbud

    my fave X-Men cover ever. Even found an official Marvel t-shirt of it at a comics shop back in the day.

  • May 6, 2010, 8:53 p.m. CST

    {blank} getting {blanked} through the {blank}

    by DOGSOUP

    Psylocke getting Pounded through the Titties. Emma Frost getting Plowed through the Gloryhole. Shadowcat...no she's still deadish...Siryn getting Fucked through the Eyesocket...damn I can do this all day...

  • May 6, 2010, 11:01 p.m. CST

    Optimus/McFarlane/Haunt

    by Joenathan

    You're totally right. Between No Spine Spiderman and Snaggle tooth Venom, that's what he does best. I honestly don't know how Kirman can look at that Haunt cover and not be embarassed by it's obviously lack of originality.

  • May 17, 2010, 7:27 p.m. CST

    I love walking dead

    by elBox

    it <p> is <p> awesome

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