Comics

AICN COMICS: ULTIMATE AVENGERS! QUEEN SONJA! PETER & MAX! & MORE!

Published at: Nov. 4, 2009, 9:52 a.m. CST

#25 10/28/09 #8

The Pull List (Click title to go directly to the review) Contest Winner Review: HEADS ON AND WE SHOOT: THE MAKING OF WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE ULTIMATE COMICS AVENGERS #3 QUEEN SONJA #1 JENNIFER LOVE HEWITT’S MUSIC BOX #1 X-FACTOR #50 PETER & MAX Novel Indie Jones presents… CHEAP SHOTS!

CONTEST WINNER REVIEW!

HEADS ON AND WE SHOOT: THE MAKING OF WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE

Editor: McSweeney’s Editorial Publisher: Harper Collins Guest Reviewer/Contest Winner: Richard R. Curran-Kelley

“The night Max wore his wolf suit and made mischief of one kind and another….” Whenever I think of WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE that first of 10 sentences instantly springs to mind. This is a book that I read countless times to my three sons as they grew and I can still recite most of it by heart (including the lines that my boys came up with for the pages with no dialogue). So I looked forward to the movie with delight and not a little fear, first watching the trailers as they appeared on line and then finally seeing the movie on the day it opened. I was extremely pleased by an adaptation that transformed a remarkable children’s book into a movie that was the book and at the same time was so much more.
Imagine, then, my delight in receiving HEADS ON AND WE SHOOT: THE MAKING OF WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE. The book presents in fascinating detail the movie’s journey through preproduction, production, and post-production (each its own bound section of the book) in a an engaging and entertaining fashion.
I found the preproduction section to be especially engrossing. Jonze and Eggars detail how they developed the script and more importantly how they worked with Maurice Sendak to get his blessing for what they planned . Sendak provides his own insights about the process and reveals that, though he had disagreements with Jonze about some of the changes (the decision to have Max depart from an actual beach rather than having the forest grow in his room), he was satisfied that the film was true to the book while being its own story.
As a new member of the cast and crew is introduced, we are provided with a picture, a quote, a bio, pictures of the tolls of the trade and finally photos of the severed hands that used the tools. I found these 2 page spreads engaging and enjoyed seeing what the various people chose to represent their work on this film whether it be Spike Jonze’s couch, Sendak’s old style LP or Katherine Keener’s paw print to represent her dogs. The severed hands were a nice touch that reminds you that this film is about wild things who at any moment could “eat you up.”
One of the most fascinating things that emerges through all three sections is how much of a wild thing Jonze is thorough out the filming. It seems that every member of the cast and crew has a story of how Jonze would wrestle, throw things, or otherwise engage in whatever behavior he felt was necessary to get the shots and performance that he wanted.
The book is of course richly illustrated with photographs detailing the process of developing the wild thing suits (animatronic heads were too heavy for the suit actors, they decided on CGI for the wild things’ faces), set design and filming some of the most difficult scenes. The photos are augmented with marginal notes in the same script used in the movie credits that gives the book the feel of a much loved book that you make notes in whenever you re-read it.
As someone who always stays and watches the credits, it was especially rewarding to see a yearbook style spread of the entire crew posing with items that pertained to their role in the helping feel the movie. I enjoyed finally getting to see the faces of the talented people who make the magic possible but rarely get the credit they deserve.
I thoroughly enjoyed reading the book and especially liked the reminiscences that were framed as conversations from various members of the cast, crew and production staff. It was a fascinating look into the world behind the camera that helped me appreciate the movie even more and made me want to be a part of making something that obviously inspired those involved. This book has already earned a place of honor on my coffee table after I get it back from my 16-year-old son who is devouring this latest foray into where the wild things are with the same gusto he displayed when we would read the original book together back when he still wanted me to read him bedtime stories.

ULTIMATE COMICS AVENGERS #3

Writer: Mark Millar Artist: Carlos Pacheco Publisher: Ultimate Marvel Reviewer: steverodgers

Mark Millar and Bryan Hitch’s first two installments of ULTIMATES—especially the first volume—were comic books done right, mostly courtesy of Hitch drawing out of his mind with cinematic, balls-to-the-wall super-hero action, massive throw downs and quippy comments. Sure, some of the heroes acted like dicks (I’m talking to you, Pym), but it was Ultimate-y, so it didn’t really matter, and I’m always happy when Cap is kicking the crap out of some no-good Nazi aliens. Presumably, I was pretty geeked up for Millar and Pacheco’s ULTIMATE COMICS AVENGERS, but I was apprehensive about the lack of Hitch. After the first three issues I can say it hasn’t hit the same heights as ULTIMATES 1 and 2, but it’s a pretty damn good read and totally batshit insane.
I didn’t read the Loeb/Mad ULTIMATES, so even though I might be missing some context, (like why Hawkeye dresses like he’s in a boy band now) it hasn’t seemed to stop my enjoyment. Turns out Captain America had a kid with his galpal Gail in some downtime during the Big One, and after he was presumed dead those dickhead bureaucrats down at State decided to force Gail to give up the kid and raise him in a lab to become a super soldier. On paper this sounds like a bang-up idea, but the boy just ain’t right, he loses his mind at 18, kills everyone in his facility, carves his face up to look like the Red Skull (kids…) and becomes a killer for hire. Cap finds out, yells something like “Ultimate no more!” and heads off to find him.
Carol Danvers, the new and apparently lazy head of S.H.I.E.L.D has too much on her plate right now (not a multi-tasker) and decides that only one man can find Cap, so she brings back Nick Fury (now with both arms) who puts together a group of psychos, including Stark’s straightedge but insane older brother Gregory (who dresses like Tom Wolfe ); War Machine (who we see destroying a village of civilians); the Red Wasp (who slaughters some dim assassins); and, best of all, Nerd Hulk (who we see with his brain sliced open getting a personality transfer). Hawkeye says in a quiet understatement, “I don’t like it… we need a guy we can control on a mission like this.” There is no one on this mission that is controllable, of course; it’s a cadre of super-powered lunatics.
Essentially you have all the elements that make up an ULTIMATES comic, only with less subtlety and build up; ULTIMATE COMICS AVENGERS cuts to the chase and gets right to the punching. Pancheco’s is art is excellent, and though it doesn’t have the epic-movie feel and realistic grit that Hitch brought to the table, it reads exactly like what it is—a comic book. ULTIMATE COMICS AVENGERS might be ULTIMATES-light, but it still has Cap keeping America safe by punching everyone he can find squarely in the face, and that will get my $3.99 every time. Hey, what can I say, I like comic books.

QUEEN SONJA #1

Writer: Joshua Ortega Art: Mel Rubi Publisher: Dynamite Entertainment Reviewer: Mr. Pasty

Red Sonja is back and this time she’s been promoted to Queen. How did this lovely redhead find her way to the throne? Well, it certainly wasn’t by the popular vote. Sonja hacked and slashed her way into royalty and not only has she returned, so has artist Mel Rubi. Aside from his work on X-MEN, PREDATOR and DR. STRANGE, Rubi also had a brief run with RED SONJA in 2005 and proves in QUEEN SONJA that he probably should have never left.
I won’t pretend that I’m not buying this book for some good old fashioned T&A, because I am. But like the RED SONJA series, this book is more than just a pretty face. While the writing is serviceable and the pacing is standard fare, this book tells its true story through images that are delectably grotesque. And ain’t that what comics are all about? Forget all that trendy subtext and introspect. Sometimes I want just a few lines to keep me in the loop and then BAM: giant swords and giant tits. Now, if you can manage to take your eyes off Sonja’s radical body for a few pages you’ll find an amazing number of details that on the surface may seem like throwaway filler, but in actuality are plot devices that deepen the mystery. I also like that QUEEN SONJA is not told in chronological order but instead works backwards to reveal clues without blowing its wad.
Having said that, it’s not unfair to suggest this book will give you literary blue balls. It may abandon some trends, but it unfortunately embraces a few others. Variant covers were cute for a while, but now it’s just annoying. Pick a great cover and run with it instead of watering down the impact of the best choice with a few that shouldn’t have made the cut. It’s like this alternate-ending phenomenon in movies. You’re not Edward Packard. Pick a fucking ending and go with it. Speaking of endings, QUEEN SONJA’S comes way too fast. I know, I know, I’m praising a book that’s light on dialogue and heavy on paint and then slamming it for being too short and not having enough material to hit the page count. In that case I must direct you to Pasty Principle #47: I’m paying for the book despite my ability to download the free torrent, therefore I have a right to criticize it as I see fit.
I was worried about the new direction of the series. I had faith in the handling of the SONJA character, but Dynamite Entertainment has a track record of fucking up so many other books like the dreadful MAN WITH NO NAME series and the laugh-out-loud train wreck that is ATHENA. I’ll smash them when they’re wrong and praise them when they’re right -- and this book is done right. Pop culture has embraced the Fonzie-inspired phrase “jump the sharks” and that was a concern of mine when I saw Sonja sluttily draped over the throne but rest assured, Sonja hasn’t jumped the sharks. Sonja is the shark.
Final Word: It’s too short and has too many covers, but I still bought the damn thing anyway. The fact that its shortcomings didn’t stop a cheapskate like me from buying it is a testament to the ongoing quality of the SONJA series. Give it a look.
Web heads who can’t get enough of Mr. Pasty’s word vomit are encouraged to watch him operate as Nostradumbass over at here. MMAmania.com. Love, hate and Mafia Wars requests should be directed here.

JENNIFER LOVE HEWITT’S MUSIC BOX #1

Created by: Jennifer Love Hewitt Written by: Scott Lobdell Artwork by: Michael Gaydos Published by: IDW Publishing Reviewed by: BottleImp

If you had ever told me that one day I would plunk down four bucks for a comic book that was emblazoned with the name “Jennifer Love Hewitt,” I would have punched you in the back of the head. Then I would have run, because you’re much bigger than I am. Actually, the only thing that made me pick this issue up from the stands and glance through it WAS the fact that it bore the name of this actress who seemed about as far removed from the world of comics as is possible. This intriguing mystery, combined with the overall good impression that I got from Gaydos’ art, led to me parting with said money and bringing the comic home.
Here’s the comic in a nutshell: Detective Oliver Kulpalski finds a music box in his precinct’s evidence room. The box is bagged, but bears no written information about where it came from or to which case the box is connected. Detective Kulpalski swipes the box from evidence and brings it home. He opens it, and the music brings him visions of future calamities. He is then able to prevent these calamities from occurring. Then the music box begins to drive the detective insane. It all ends in tragedy, and the music box is once again filed away in the evidence room. The End.
If my summation of MUSIC BOX reads as bland or colorless, that’s only because the story really has no life to it. I get the concept, the music box drives people to insanity, blah blah blah…it’s nothing that hasn’t already been done before. Tolkien’s One Ring, Lovecraft’s “Necronomicon” (and its precursor in Chambers’ “The King in Yellow”)… literature and film are full of the “cursed object” plots. So MUSIC BOX right away loses points for originality. Additional points must be taken away due to Lobdell’s “tell, not show” style of writing. For example, here’s the text from page 15, where the detective shoots someone in the park: “The music box has given him everything he’s ever wanted—to make a difference. And all it has asked for in exchange…is his sanity.” Maybe the blame needs to be equally parceled out to Gaydos here, because the artwork that accompanies this passage shows the detective and a body floating in the fountain, but the details are so vague that one can’t tell if the victim was in fact a criminal or just an innocent bystander. It looks like it’s wearing some sort of bulky belt, but is that supposed to be an important detail? I sure as hell don’t know. I generally like Michael Gaydos’ work, but here the art and the words are just not meshing together well.
Ultimately, MUSIC BOX reads as a sort of a TWILIGHT ZONE pastiche—which may work fine for a one-shot story, but is this really going to be an ongoing series? Though a part of me is interested to see if this series will be able to develop into anything other than a “possession of the month” title, a much larger part of me doesn’t care enough to invest any more money into it.
And now, if I may briefly rant…
What the hell is going on with celebrities “creating” or “producing” comic books? How much are they actually contributing to the process, given that every time I’ve seen a title with the name of some television actor or musician plastered across the cover I open the comic to see that said celebrity is uncredited as contributing to writing, artwork or even the editing of the comic book that he or she “created”? The cynical side of me (which comprises about 93%) thinks that these celebrities are using the comic book medium as a way to develop their own projects, garner some buzz, then turn them into movie or television deals. And it is my opinion that comic book companies are publishing this stuff not because they believe in the product, but because they believe that the name recognition will boost sales. I hope I’m not right, because that would mean that publishers are no longer concerned with making compelling stories, but see their industry as solely a money machine, looking for the next big deal rather than concentrating on putting out material that exists purely as its own entity, with no thought given to multi-million dollar film adaptation.
In short, I’m betting that MUSIC BOX “creator” Jennifer Love Hewitt is hoping for a vehicle out of all this. After all, GHOST WHISPERER can’t last forever, and there’s only so much that plastic surgery can do.
End rant.
When released from his Bottle, the Imp takes the form of Stephen Andrade, an artist/illustrator/pirate monkey painter from the Northeast. You can see some of his artwork athere. He’s given up comics more times than he can remember. But every time he thinks he's out, they pull him back in.

X-FACTOR #50

Writer: Peter David Artist: DeLandro Publisher: Marvel Comics Reviewer: Optimous Douche

I’ve been married to X-FACTOR since the early 90s for one simple reason: this is the one mainstream title that not only seems content to live on the fringes of the Marvel universe, but thrives as a result of this solitary continuity confinement. Sure, there have been the few editorially mandated forays into crossover events (see SECRET INVASION), but thankfully those times have been few and far between. This unfettered story oasis has left David the freedom to tell stories about mutant adults who not only try to save the world but, just like all of us normal adults, save themselves from the world. Basically, you don’t need to be a fan of mutants to be a fan of X-FACTOR. For anyone that has shunned this title because you need heroes in spandex instead of blue jeans, it’s time to put your prejudices aside and pick up this latest story-run exploring X-FACTOR’s “Days of Future Past” the minute it comes out in trade. Seriously, if you’ve never read X-FACTOR before, don’t buy this issue, you will be very very confused.
However, for those that are familiar with the concepts of fetal absorption and inter-dimensional gay love, issue 50 offers closure to the epically long and equally enjoyable Summers Rebellion. With more reveals than Vanessa Hudgens’ camera phone, David once again uses his trademark wit coupled with the element of surprise to answer questions not only specific to X-FACTOR, but also the conundrum wrapped in a riddle that started years ago in HOUSE OF M: just who the hell is Layla Miller?
Actually, when you take a step back from the page, the Summers Rebellion wasn’t even the real story here. It was a fun diversion, but there’s a reason I kept calling it “Days of X-FACTOR’s Future Past.” Marvel, and more specifically mutant fans, have traversed the dystopian future many times before. The real story behind X-FACTOR has always been the relationship between Multiple Man and the once little girl, now full on hottie, that “knows stuff” Layla Miller.
This isn’t to take away from the Summers Rebellion; the invention of Ruby Summers, daughter of Scott Summers and Emma Frost, was a great addition to the stable of future mutant babies. Likewise the twists and turns of 80 years past tomorrow were enjoyable as well. Want to know what happened to that Madrox dupe Forge hurtled into the time stream over a year ago? You got it: turns out just like Vyger from “Star Trek”, what was once simple can evolve to great heights given enough space and time. Were you wondering where Falcone’s hard-on against mutants stemmed from? Issue fifty gives you insight into a little boy that had everything taken from him by mutants and wants retribution. Also, I give David credit for one line in particular that breaks the fourth wall invoking a “brand new day” once all of the mutants are gone.
However, it all goes back to Layla for me, who in the final pages of the main story finally reveals what her true power is, and I’ll tell you now, she is way more than just a girl that “knows stuff.” I would say more, but true fans of X-FACTOR will want to read it for themselves.
This is the first issue in a long time where I felt the extra dollar price bump was justified and DC would be wise to take note. When I asked Dan Didio at Wizard World to justify how a book was deemed worthy of the $2.99 versus $3.99 price tag, I was assured that “the higher price books have more content.” As we all have learned, this extra content is usually a preview of an upcoming book, generally having nothing to do with the story or title you’re holding in your hands. Also, this extra story is shoehorned into every single book DC puts out that month. This is not extra content; it’s called an advertisement, just like those horrid “stay off drugs” PSAs. With X-FACTOR 50, not only is the main story longer than the standard, but you get a back-up story specific to this book that resets the team back to a state of “normality.”
Great story – great dialogue – and great art. Happy 50th guys, it has been a true pleasure.
When Optimous Douche isn’t reading comics and misspelling the names of 80’s icons, he “transforms” into a corporate communications guru. "What if the whole world had superpowers? Find out in the pages of Optimous’ original book AVERAGE JOE. Read the first full issue on Optimous’ New Blog and see original sketches by fellow @$$hole Bottleimp. If you are a publisher or can help these guys get AVERAGE JOE up, up, and on the shelves in any way, drop Optimous a line."

PETER & MAX Novel

By Bill Willingham Illustations by Steve Leialoha Publisher: DC Vertigo Guest Reviewer: Richard R. Curran-Kelley

I have been a fan of FABLES since I picked up the first issue one Wednesday 7 years ago and was confronted with the mystery of who killed Rose Red, so naturally when I heard that Bill Willingham had written a FABLES novel I was excited and intrigued. I became even more intrigued when I found out that the novel took place in continuity, but focused on two Fables who, so far, had not played a part in the series.
The book starts off with a quick run down of who the Fables are, where they came from and even why they call themselves Fables. It is the perfect primer for any newcomer and so concisely explains the basics that we readers have been gleaning since 2002 that it could be a perfect intro for any of the graphic novels.
The center of the story is the 2 Piper brothers, Peter and Max. Peter Piper is much more than the simple pickled pepper eater of rhyme and this is mainly his story as the book starts with him in modern times realizing that his final confrontation with Max, the Pied Piper of Hamelin, is now upon us. The modern portions of the book allow us to see Peter interact with some of the Fables we are accustomed to seeing such as Rose Red, Bigby (the two share a history and have not necessarily let bygones be bygones), Beast and Frau Totenkinder who has a history with Max.
As Peter makes his way toward his final meeting with Max, Willingham fills in the backstory of both characters from their time as members of a traveling minstrel family through their first encounter with the Adversary’s invading armies which leads to their estrangement and sets them on the path to their first confrontation. Peter’s story is entwined with that of Bo Peep, while Max follows a path that will not permit any reconciliation with his brother.
The tale is as engaging as any we have seen in the regular series or graphic novels, and Peter, like Jack before him, is any Peter from fairy tale or rhyme. Bear in mind that the stories we get here in the mundie world are but pale reflections of the real events in the Homelands and you find yourself realizing that despite his peaceful nature, Peter is a badass. Max is no less dangerous, but he did not resonate quite so true as Peter. Max is indeed a challenging villain, but his reasons for turning out the way he did seem so destined that he does not have quite the depth that one would hope for.
The illustrations by Steve Leialoha enhance the story as his work is easily recognizable from his work on the series. His illustrations instantly transport the reader into the familiar Fables world and help set the mood for the story. The real highlight of his work is the epilogue which tells in comic format an untold tale of the final war against the empire. The story is only 8 pages long, but I hope to see it colored and collected in a future trade collection.
I found the book to be entertaining to the point that I would love to see Peter show up in the monthly. Willingham has made him a character that would be a great addition to the regular cast and has fortunately written this novel so that it, unlike almost all of the other comic book novels out, fits solidly into the world he brings to us every 30 days. Read this book and let the music take you to the homelands and beyond.

Ambush Bugback again with a boatload of fun indie books you may want to check out when the taste of the mainstream gets a bit stale. Check em out! Up first we’ve got an indie from Mr. pasty, then I ring in with a pair of cool indie books.

INDEGO BLUE: OLD MEMORIES, YOUNG HOPES #1 St. James

I hope the powerhouse publishers are paying attention to what’s happening over at St. James. The gang that brought us the brilliantly developed EX OCCULTUS is back with INDEGO BLUE, an astonishing tale about gene splicing gone awry and the terrified higher-ups that have been charged with eradicating the half-breed menace it’s responsible for creating. St. James continues to lay the blueprint for comic book success in the way it delivers familiar themes in a fresh and intriguing light with artwork that isn’t overly obsessed with itself. This isn’t about how many pin-ups you can fit inside a book; it’s about telling a story in a way that respects the narrative. Why is this so hard for the big guys to understand? Maybe it’s ego, maybe it’s control, or maybe they lost their way somewhere along the line and forgot how to have fun. Like the movie DISTRICT 9, INDEGO BLUE presents a society populated by both humans and non-humans. It’s pretty cut and dry. But what happens when you end up with something that’s a little bit of both? Are they victims? Are they villains? INDEGO BLUE doesn’t say for sure (yet), but I for one am really looking forward to finding out. –Mr. Pasty

PORTABLE GRINDHOUSE: THE LOST ART OF THE VHS BOX Fantagraphics Books

If you’re a child of the late seventies/early eighties as I am, PORTABLE GRINDHOUSE is a must have. I used to beg my mom every week to take me to the TV store/video store amalgam just so I could ogle at all of the amazing video boxes. Of course, I leaned toward the horror section. At first, I wasn’t allowed to see them, but after massive amounts of begging and pleading, my mom gave in. One by one, I tried to rent them all, no matter how cheesy the cover. And as I got through the entire section it was time for me to start over again and see them all again. Flipping through this book which collects the front and back covers of some extremely obscure films from that era sent out a wave of nostalgia that nearly knocked me on my @$$. The thing is, I’ve rented a lot of these movies and haven’t seen these covers in years. SLITHIS! ORCA THE KILLER WHALE! COLOR ME BLOOD RED! SLASHDANCE! ONE ARMED EXECUTIONER! ILSA: SHE WOLF OF THE SS! STUNT ROCK! STUNT ROCK!!!! I saw fucking STUNT ROCK! I can’t believe STUNT ROCK is in this book! I guarantee if you remember the birth of the video store, before Blockbuster Video edged all of the mom and pop shops out of business, you will love this book as much as I did. Thanks, Jacques Boyreau, for compiling this amazing collection of nostalgic blasts from the past! I’d love to see more in future volumes of this book! - Ambush Bug

CAPTAIN ACTION: THE ORIGINAL SUPER-HERO ACTION FIGURE HC TwoMorrows

Though the figure first appeared before my time, I heard bits and pieces about Captain Action through the years. But it wasn’t until checking out this thorough retrospective on the long and varied life of the property that I realized how big the figure used to be. Action was a sort of every-hero toy, equipped with costumes that transformed your one figure into many, from Batman to Tonto to Nick Fury to the Phantom. Apparently existing before people sued for copyright infringement, Captain Action was a comic company crossover figure. The books gives copious amounts of pictures showing every incarnation of the good Captain along with his sidekick, Action Boy, and his gals, the Super Queens (this was the olden days, folks. Something tells me the Super Queens would be an entirely different action figure these days). I loved looking at all of the different variations of the figure. It was especially fun to check out all of the different accessories that came with the toys. And how can you not love Action’s arch-nemesis Dr. Evil and his wicked retro energy medallion! The book also charts Captain Action’s adventures in comic books too. The guy was drawn by some of the greats like Gil Kane, Wally Wood, and Jim Shooter. This is a great book that shed some light on a toy line I wasn’t familiar with, but from all of the cool toys shown in this book, I wish I was. Michael Eury has done a marvelous job of squeezing every bit of info you’d ever want to read about Captain Action into one amazing book. - Ambush Bug
Ambush Bug is Mark L. Miller, reviewer and co-editor of AICN Comics for over eight years and one of the original @$$holes. Check out his comic book shorts from Cream City Comics’ MUSCLES & FIGHTS VOL.3 and MUSCLES & FRIGHTS VOL.1 on his ComicSpace page. Bug was interviewed here and here at Cream City Comics and here and here about his latest comic from Bluewater Comics, VINCENT PRICE PRESENTS: THE TINGLER #1-2. Look for more comics from Bug in 2010 from Bluewater, including VINCENT PRICE PRESENTS WITCHFINDER GENERAL, ROGER CORMAN PRESENTS DEATHSPORT, and the just announced vampire miniseries NANNY & HANK..

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY #19 Marvel Comics

You know what’s great about using B-List characters? Pretty much anything can (and in this issue, does) happen. Abnett and Lanning are cementing their position as Marvel’s top writers with every consecutive month, and this month’s resolution of the GOTG timeline crisis does not disappoint. Action, drama, pathos, a great cameo by Kang the Conqueror, and all drawn with great energy and sense of dynamism by Wesley Craig, who’s becoming one of my favorite “cartoony” (i.e. not rendering every single fold, wrinkle or hair) artists. This issue is a great one for aspiring comic artists to check out, just to see how you can make a flat page covered with static images as lively as any motion picture. And it’s got a telepathic Russian dog—bonus! – Imp

JUSTICE SOCIETY OF AMERICA #32 DC Comics

This title is still humming along nicely courtesy of Sturges’ and Willingham’s multilayered mystery, the friction amongst the JSA members, and the unrelenting assault upon the team by a slew of DC’s third-tier villains. Once again, I’m just happy that JSA has moved away from the happy-lovey-hugfest that tainted the end of Geoff Johns’ run and come back to the fold of superhero action. Jesus Merino also pushes this title to a new standard with his detailed yet never overly-busy art. My only beef is that the new Dr. Fate got dropped into this title without as much as a word of who he was, and I had to resort to Wikipedia to read up on the new Kent Nelson. Sometimes I pine for the good old days of heavy plot and character exposition… - Imp

PUNISHER: THE LIST #1 Marvel Comics

Can’t end the week without mentioning the single biggest holy shit moment of the week; namely ****SPOILER****The dismembering of Frank Castle by Wolvie Junior. Now, I know this reeks of stunt storytelling where sure you have a status quo shaking event happen only to have the character return to the status quo before you have to flip your mattress. But I can’t help but admire the sheer kick-@$$ery Remender adds to this issue. From start to finish, Frank goes down fighting. ****END SPOILER**** This is one issue where I didn’t know what to expect and once I read it, I couldn’t believe it. It takes a lot to surprise this Bug, but this issue did it to me. Even with JRJR’s clunky art and awkward panels, this issue was one of my favorite issues from Marvel this year. - Ambush Bug

Editing, compiling, imaging, coding, logos & cat-wrangling by Ambush Bug Proofs, co-edits & common sense provided by Sleazy G


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Readers Talkback

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  • Nov. 4, 2009, 9:57 a.m. CST

    well what can I say?

    by The_Crimson_King

    except you know what

  • Looking forward to Man Thing - Brown

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 9:59 a.m. CST

    Yeah, but did you read that last Hulk?

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    That's what I want to know.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:01 a.m. CST

    I have always been interested in Hewitt's box.

    by ballyhoo

    I could make some great music with it.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:01 a.m. CST

    No Ambush Bug: Year None #7 review?

    by rev_skarekroe

    Come on, man. How can you name yourself after a character and NOT review the final issue of his series?

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:06 a.m. CST

    Ultimate Comics Avengers

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Yeah, Pacheco's art is excellent and makes it worth checking out. <p> I didn't know that Hitch drew any "quippy comments" in the first two series though. <p> He must draw quippy comments in the same way that Loeb writes costumes! <p> Those are some multi-talented guys, for sure.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:06 a.m. CST

    Peter David may be phoning it in....

    by cookylamoo

    but I'm still picking up the receiver.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:07 a.m. CST

    Steve, Optimus

    by Joenathan

    Great reviews. One of these days, I swear, I will get around to trying out X-Factor. I will. <br><br>Also... Did Bug just say that he liked a Dark Reign title? Did I read that wrong?

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:13 a.m. CST

    And I bought none of those titles

    by Series7

    Though that VHS box cover art sounds really cool. Someone needs to send several hundred copies of it to who ever is in charge of Blu Ray Cover Art.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:20 a.m. CST

    Ambush Bug

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    You're seriously going to say that about John Romita Jr.? It seems to run completely contrary to the truth of the matter.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:27 a.m. CST

    Please God let Jeff Loeb retire please.

    by 3 Bag Enema

    Please.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:27 a.m. CST

    They all phone it in.

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Telecommunications is how creators make comics nowadays. They don't all live together in a big office. Crossgen tried that and it didn't work.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:28 a.m. CST

    Joen - X-Factor

    by optimous_douche

    You really should give it the old trade looksee...<p> I also wasn't kidding about the early 90's stuff. If you can get past the horrid Stroman art (which wasn't quite as horrid back then -- it was actually refreshing given the image alternative) you'll find some great stories.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:28 a.m. CST

    Peter David

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    I'm screening all my calls at this point, and he gets the answering machine.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:28 a.m. CST

    Justice Society: We Shall agree to disagree

    by Psynapse

    Sorry Imp but this new run is falling flatter than Pamela Andersen's tits in a dart contest for me. After this arc, I'm out.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:29 a.m. CST

    I agree about JRJR

    by Laserhead

    Really don't see the appeal. His faces are identical, his panels clumsy, and MORE IMPORTANTLY, it looks like it takes him about half an hour to draw an entire comic-- sketchy and rushed, half-finished, clunkiness.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:37 a.m. CST

    Nobody's made a joke about getting into Hewitt's box?

    by newc0253

    then let me be the first!

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:37 a.m. CST

    Laserhead

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    I bet that all of the top artists working in comics, as well as all of your personal favorites, would disagree with you. <p> But hey, it's subjective opinion stuff, and actually knowing about illustration doesn't really enter into it. More power to you. <p> Peace!

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:38 a.m. CST

    Punisher

    by BlueHawaiiSurfer

    Yeah I agree 100%. I didn't really see that coming at all. Not a bad read. Frank did go down fighting the entire way.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:38 a.m. CST

    oh wait, someone already did?

    by newc0253

    ah well, even sloppy seconds with Hewitt would be worth it.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:39 a.m. CST

    Punisher

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    My favorite part was "...It's a good lie." What a great line.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:40 a.m. CST

    Psynapse

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Yeah, JSA stinks now. It's too bad, since it used to be so great.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:42 a.m. CST

    3 Bag Enema

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Wow, three "pleases." <p> Maybe your imaginary being of choice will grant your wish. Or maybe Jeph Loeb will continue to be one of the biggest writers in the entire industry, continuing to give you something to whine about and hate on without reason. Time will tell. <p> It's good to be passionate about stuff! Keep it up.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:42 a.m. CST

    JRJR

    by Laserhead

    Actually, I know a bit about illustration and graphic design, elements of composition, arrangement of forms, etc. That is what helps me to see JRJR's 'illustrations' as hurried, sketchy, repetitive, and clumsily arranged. I can't think of any artist who includes LESS detail that JRJR.<p>I'd also be willing to bet you don't know what any industry pro really thinks, outside of public commentary and interviews. You don't talk shit about other professionals in your field, especially if they're nice guys (which JRJR seems to be).

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:45 a.m. CST

    JR JR

    by Coma Baby

    I like his art but I agree about the faces looking the same. One thing that really annoys me about his art is that it lacks life/motion. It's beautiful and interesting, and does a great job illustrating the story ideas, but his panels look like they were made for stained glass windows in a comic church. Everything looks frozen. His run on Daredevil was fantastic and I loved his interpretation of Mephisto. Laserhead, I have to disagree with you - all those lines look like they'd take forever to draw.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:48 a.m. CST

    Red She-Hulk

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    When Red Hulk told Red She-Hulk the fable about the elephant and the 3 blind men, she says that "Someone I loved told it to me" and that "He's dead to me now." <p> Seems like evidence is pointing to Glenn Talbot as Red Hulk and Betty as Red She-Hulk. They were married at one point, then divorced, and then Talbot died. Makes sense.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:48 a.m. CST

    RE: Lines-- They don't

    by Laserhead

    Draw a bunch of lines running perpendicular to a single line giving the implication of shape-- it doesn't take long at all. His line shading isn't meticulously arranged (like, say, Brian Bolland's) and if you look at his pencils, the lines are often just scribbles which he relies on the inker to make uniform.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:53 a.m. CST

    Laserhead

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    I too know more than a bit about "illustration and graphic design, elements of composition, arrangement of forms, etc." and that's what helps me to see how excellent JRJR is, and how he possesses mad skillz. <p> You would also lose the bet about me not actually knowing what "any industry pro really thinks."

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:55 a.m. CST

    Um, RE: DC $3.99....

    by MPJedi2

    Every DC book that I've seen at the $3.99 price is either a "Special Event" (which have always been more expensive) or has a back-up feature. Unlike, say, Marvel, where $3.99 seems to just be for anything that's selling well, with no extra content. Optimus Douche can think about that for a moment before he starts bitching about DC.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 10:59 a.m. CST

    Who honestly thinks that

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    you could grow up with John Romita as your father and not know how to illustrate a comic book? <p> Anyone? Who else wants to cop to believing that? <p> Opinions on Kubert's kids? Or does that whole family suck too?

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:01 a.m. CST

    I don't like JRJr either

    by rev_skarekroe

    His stuff looks like sketchily adapted illustrations of Duplo people.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:02 a.m. CST

    Yo We_Pray! RE: Crossgen

    by Psynapse

    Crossgen failed because Alessi is a total tool. He is a longtime customer of my LCS and I've been unfortunate enough to have to listen to his fanboy verbal wankfests a few too many times over the last 20 years.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:05 a.m. CST

    Nope. I won that bet.

    by Laserhead

    I totally won it.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:09 a.m. CST

    Nobody said he did "not know how to illustrate"

    by Laserhead

    My comments basically revolve around how rushed and incomplete and repetitive his stuff looks. He knows how to draw, but he seems to be all about speed and produces clunky, sketchy work that often looks half-finished and lack detail, movement and dimension. I'm looking at the "Election Day" trade of Spider-Man right now. Panels that are nothing but close-up shots of sketchy faces without expression or dimension. Backgrounds often non-existent. Injury turns a face into a scribble. Scribble-style. That's what this is.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:09 a.m. CST

    Psynapse

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Ha! Even though that may be true, I'm sure that the writers and artists don't enjoy being forced to work on-site together. It seems like creative people generally like freedom, and probably do their best work when they feel less constrained. I'm just speculating. I don't really know anything about Crossgen.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:18 a.m. CST

    Laserhead

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    So we can agree then that JRJR really knows how to illustrate and that you just don't appreciate his style. Fair enough. <p> It seemed like you were saying he didn't know how to illustrate with comments like "Actually, I know a bit about illustration and graphic design, elements of composition, arrangement of forms, etc. That is what helps me to see JRJR's 'illustrations' as hurried, sketchy, repetitive, and clumsily arranged." <p> It's not too often that someone who *does* know how to illustrate creates something that is "clumsily arranged." I would say that, generally speaking, when something is "clumsily arranged" it's because they *don't* know how to illustrate. It seemed like you were criticizing his "elements of composition." But I'm sure that's not what you meant to say, and that you're just having a hard time expressing yourself. <p> Also, if you can't think of an artist who includes less detail than JRJR, then you aren't thinking hard enough, or you simply don't know enough about comic artists to come up with any of the myriad examples that exist. <p> As far as winning that bet, just tell yourself whatever makes you feel better. It's what you're going to do anyway, regardless of any facts. <p> Peace!

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:23 a.m. CST

    We_Pray...

    by Psynapse

    Oh dude, just find any interview with Mark Waid on Crossgen. Alessi would literally scream at the top of his lungs for ANY (including imagined ones)deviation from his instruction on story or art. He bitched for YEARS at the LCS about how EVERYTHING on the stands was crap and not what people (read: He) wanted. to read.When Crossgen launched (I live in Tampa Bay) we(by we, I mean the wednesday gang at the LCS) were hoping for it's success but seriously doubted it would last based solely on what an arrogant (and REALLY rude) cockmaster he was.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:27 a.m. CST

    Hmm...very few reviews this week.

    by Homer Sexual

    I still have like 5 more comics from last week to read, and have none of the comics reviewed. <p> Ultimate Marvel Avengers or whatever they're called...sounds interesting. Looked boring the first issue. I shall wait for the trade. <p> JSA--dropped at the end of the last run. Found it to be a bit much, but as I've said before, I don't find Willingham's writing interesting, so never checked this one out. <p> Hulk, of course, was totally enjoyable. Don't know how to say something like Red She-Hulk isn't dumb..but I dig it. <p> I read New Avengers, but can't quite remember it. Detective/Batwoman was still high quality, but not quite as good as last story arc. The childhood backstory usually doesn't work for me, but this one was good. Last night I read something that had the main character going on a date with Peter Parker on the last page...knew there was trouble when May Parker appeared..but can't recall who the heroine was. Gotham city Sirens..the writing this issue was very good, but the art is still just not working for me.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:29 a.m. CST

    JR JR

    by Homer Sexual

    My two cents is that his style works better on some books than others. For example, his Starbrand worked. His X-Men were pretty sketchy. I don't think he's bad...but sometimes it does look very rushed or tossed off. <p> OTOH, his work on Daredevil was simply awesome, a perfect match with the writer and tone. Nocenti and he were a great, underrated creative team.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:31 a.m. CST

    Psynapse

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Yeah, I've heard that stuff from Waid before. It certainly couldn't have helped his business succeed.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:38 a.m. CST

    Can you name an artist who includes less detail?

    by Laserhead

    How about sharing these myriad examples? Bruce Timm or someone with that cartoony a style doesn't count.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:41 a.m. CST

    Homer Sexual

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    You're exhibiting non-binary thinking with this "his style works better on some books than others" stuff. That's not going to go over well here. Didn't anyone tell you that you have to either completely love or completely hate something based on the opinion of the hive mind? <p> As far as Red She-Hulk being "dumb," I can't say how the color red is any "dumber" than the color green. I think that you're right in digging the best Hulk comic in a damn long time. <p> I mean, if you can buy everything else that happens in comic books, how is adding the color red to something going to make a comic book any more ridiculous? <p> "Sure, I can totally buy that a guy got bitten by an irradiated spider and can then climb walls, and it just makes sense that when a gamma bomb explodes on someone they turn into a giant green monster... But this giant red monster? It's dumb and unbelievable. Not realistic at all!" <p> "M.O.D.O.K., on the other hand, that shit could totally happen."

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:44 a.m. CST

    Laserhead

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Why doesn't Bruce Timm (or anyone else with a style that you dub to be "cartoony") count? <p> You want to be able to say "Give me an example of someone who includes less detail, but people who include less detail don't count." <p> Not that I agree that Bruce Timm includes less detail, mind you.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:47 a.m. CST

    So DC can charge an extra dollar for some crappy...

    by superhero

    Captain Atom story that no one gives a shit about and is so badly illustrated and written that it makes the art of Action Comics look like Alex Ross art by comparison? Are you kidding me??? And no event is so "special" that it requires me to pay an extra dollar for a comic. I just asked my comic guy to drop Action Comics and Adventure comics when I went in to the shop to pick up four months of comics. Fuck four dollar comics. Fuck glossy paper. Fuck overdone computer coloring. Fuck overpaid Hollywood talent. And Fuck you comic book industry for pricing me out of a hobby I loved and defended for years and years and years until I finally saw how deluded it was to throw my money away on overpriced comic books! And four bucks is too much to pay for a Jennifer Love Hewitt comic book! Fuck, man...thirty cents is too much to pay for that nonsense! Yeeesh!! Fuck you comic book industry!!! Fuck you very much!!!!

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:50 a.m. CST

    Crossgen

    by Joenathan

    I loved it when that crapfest failed.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:52 a.m. CST

    Ultimatum

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Oh yeah, and I read Ultimatun a couple of days ago. <p> It was far from Loeb's best stuff (and I'm not that into Finch), but I can't really understand what the Ultimate fans are so upset about. It had lots of really visceral, violent gore. It "shockingly" killed lots of characters. It was completely different from the regular Marvel U. <p> What's an "Ultimate" fan not to like?

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:54 a.m. CST

    Oh, give me a break.

    by Laserhead

    Is that the best you can do? You say there's a 'myriad' of other artists out there who include less detail than JRJR, and you can't name any. A cartoony style precludes a certain lack of detail with rendering-- that's why it resembles a cartoon. Do you know what detail is? You don't exactly seem to. A detail is an individual feature of something represented. So go on, name all these artists who include less detail than JRJR. Please. Access the myriad names in your professional database.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 11:56 a.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by Mr.FTW

    But you know you loved Defiant and Valiant

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 12:17 p.m. CST

    Laserhead

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    You're getting a little bit too riled up. Simmer down. <p> My question was legit, and yes, I understand what "detail" is. <p> Is that the best that you can do? Sorry that I can't give you a break. <p> My point was that if a "cartoony" style lacks detail, and all "cartoony" styles are excluded when listing the myriad examples of people who include less detail than JRJR, then aren't you basically saying "Give me an example of someone who includes less detail, but people who include less detail don't count"? Are you prentending to not understand that for the sake of arguing? <p> Does this come from you segregating out what you consider to be "cartoony" styles in your mind as being somehow less than what you would consider to be a "real" or "legitimate" style of art? Does this mean that you more highly value any kind of "detail" than you would more "stylized," or "representational" art? <p> This next one's going to blow your mind then: <p> It's all representational, really! Artifice. Facade. Not real, no matter how many lines are included. <p> But I guess that sort of philosophical conversation will be a lost cause, and is really neither here nor there in our little exchange. <p> Here's an example for you: <p> Frank Miller <p> Peace!

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 12:42 p.m. CST

    MPJEDI

    by optimous_douche

    Not a lot to think about here.<p> Almost EVERY DC book these days is a special event or ties to a special event. The few books that aren't special events, they cram in horrid back-up stories (that are the same damn story across all titles that week) and charge you out the ass for basically reading a preview. It's like the movie theater having different price points for movies with and without previews.<p> I won't say Marvel isn't guilty of the same shennanigans. Honestly I wouldn't know. I've always been a mainly a mutie lover when it comes to Marvel and the X-books have stayed pretty balanced.<p> Regardless, I was specifically talking about X-FACTOR 50. Good and relevant extra content. If MArvel needs to take the same cue for their other books so be it. Next time I will call out both houses.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 12:49 p.m. CST

    I got one for "non-cartoony less detailed"

    by ebonic_plague

    Josh Middleton, that guy who was doing NYX at it's start.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 12:51 p.m. CST

    "horrid back-up stories"

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    I think that Metal Men is pretty good, and I really like the art a lot in The Question.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 12:51 p.m. CST

    "horrid back-up stories"

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    I think that Metal Men is pretty good, and I really like the art a lot in The Question.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 12:52 p.m. CST

    oops

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    double post

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 12:56 p.m. CST

    Marvel's shennanigans:

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    The Ellis X-Men comic "Ghost Boxes." <p> That was the pinnacle of shennanigans. How about 12 pages of comic and then 11 pages of script for the comic. At least the DC backups actually *are* comics.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 12:59 p.m. CST

    Hey I Don't Play favorites

    by optimous_douche

    My review of X-Men Ghost boxes: http://www.aintitcool.com/node/39478#2

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1 p.m. CST

    Whoa, whoa, mad skillz, watch that heart rate

    by Laserhead

    I don't want that bum ticker you acquired from a lifetime of sedentary living to give out, what with you ranting about the Kubert family, and trying to equivocate your way out of an assertion you can't back up (Artifice! Representation! Let's bring the topic to such a point of abstraction as to become meaningless!)<p>Frank Miller? What does he draw? Anything? Nothing? Right. Nothing. I can't think of any working comic artist who uses less detail than JRJR, who draws in an essentially realist style, and whose scribbling is but a few steps above doodles.<p>Keep praying for mad skillz, kid. You won't acquire any that way, but prayer has the same relationship to reality as your assertions, i.e., zip.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:03 p.m. CST

    Non-cartoony less detailed?

    by Psynapse

    Adrian Alphona!

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:06 p.m. CST

    Back Up Stories and X-Factor

    by Homer Sexual

    I forgot...I did read X-Factor 50. Unlike Optimus Douche, the whole Time Travelers Wife romance between Madrox and Layla is very unappealing to me. The whole time travel thing, even without the creepy romance, is unappealing to me. I actually think X-Factor is over-rated, but there is just enough good stuff in it to keep me coming back, but it's continually on the edge of my "drop" list. I find it rather pretentious and full of itself...but it does have its moments. <p> I love the Question. But I don't think her back-up works. As mentioned, its just a tease. Also, don't care for her new short hair. The Ravager back-up is a lot better, seems to pack more into the pages. I actually like Ravager more than Teen Titans, while Batwoman is definitely done better than the Question. <p> PS: Just Look at Red She-Hulk. She is hilarious! And what sort of cockamamie origin will she have. Please, its ridiculous (but I love it).

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:07 p.m. CST

    Actually, Frank Miller was a good example.

    by Homer Sexual

    He really has like no detail at all in his art. Not that I really care...a lot of good art is not very detailed, while some very detailed art isn't so popular (Simone Bianchi! I gave my own example!)

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:08 p.m. CST

    "Even with JRJR’s clunky art and awkward panels...

    by nofate

    JRJR is a friend of mine, and you sir are no JRJR. 'Nuff said.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:15 p.m. CST

    Adrian Alphona kicks ass!

    by loodabagel

    Regardless of details, he draws what's important.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:16 p.m. CST

    One thing about Hulk....

    by Psynapse

    For some reason I LOVE Churchill's new art style.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:20 p.m. CST

    Detail is overrated...

    by superhero

    Just ask Wil Eisner...

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:21 p.m. CST

    Not saying Eisner's art is not detailed...

    by superhero

    He's just gone on record as saying it's not as important as storytelling ability...

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:23 p.m. CST

    If you have enough good moments

    by optimous_douche

    you have a book....

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:23 p.m. CST

    JRJR...

    by loodabagel

    I really like his Spider-Man. Not crazy about his various X-Men stuff, or those early-nineties comics with the vertical double-page spreads. He can be good or bad, for example, the first six issues of Black Panther he drew are fucking hideous. Some of the boxiest, sketchiest stuff I've ever seen from the guy.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:24 p.m. CST

    Don't think detail is a necessity, or any kind of yardstick

    by Laserhead

    There are artists in whose attention to detail the reader can revel, and artists whose work gains effect through its simplicity. I only made the point with JRJR because, in his style, the lack of detail seems to be an indication of drawing EXTREMELY FAST. His is not a style which gains its effects through a lack of detail; it's just sloppy and rushed.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:25 p.m. CST

    How does the old saying go?

    by ebonic_plague

    For the first half of your artistic career, you learn what lines to include, and for the second half, you learn what to leave out.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:29 p.m. CST

    Goose is back

    by gooseud

    1. I would argue that "I Know What You Did Last Summer" Love Hewitt is amongst the hottest chicks I've had the pleasure of seeing. Granted, she went a bit downhill after that, but during that era, wowsers. Having said that, I nearly fell out of my chair seeing the A$$holes reviewing a friggin Jennifer Love Hewitt comic. 2. I'm with Homer on X-Factor. I actually havent been back to it since Stroman appeared a year or so ago. Dont get me wrong, I love me some Peter David, but I simply cant bring myself to care about yet another dystopian future. I dont care how clever it is, or awesome, or whatever, and I'm not saying it isnt. I'll probably check out the trade, but I just feel like it lost its mojo for me when they forced that X-book crossover on Peter David a few years back. If anyone in the industry has learned anything, its to not force a crossover on David, he doesnt react well. 3. Having said that, I scored a near-complete run of Peter David's Hulk from that late 80's-90's and have been re-reading it. Pure genius. You could put that run out today in 2009 and it would be a monster hit. The bachelor party issue is amongst the best single issues of any comic I've ever read. 4. If you arent reading Irredeemable, or read it and dropped it, you oughta give it another try. Issue 7, crappy art aside, was a quantum leap forward on the cool scale.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:29 p.m. CST

    And if you're JRJR, you learn 'Page rate! Page rate!'

    by Laserhead

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:30 p.m. CST

    couple other things

    by gooseud

    I found Planetary #27 a bit of a letdown, and I'm thinking of getting the Secret Six trades. Sexcret Six kicks ass, right? I love the mini during Infinite Crisis or whatever that was.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:32 p.m. CST

    Also.........

    by gooseud

    I guess the kid is gone, eh? I havent seen a Liam review for 6 weeks or so now, I actually feel kinda vaguely guilty if the negativity or whatever drove him off.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:38 p.m. CST

    Secret Six kicks tremendous ass

    by Laserhead

    I feel pretty solid recommending that first trade of seven issues. They were great. (Still is great, I guess, I haven't been to a store in a while).

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:39 p.m. CST

    Ian Churchill's new style...

    by loodabagel

    <p>I haven't seen much, but I flipped through an issue of Hulk and liked the art. Most other artists have gone the sketchy route these days. Frank Miller, John Romita JR, Leniel Yu, the guy who draws Mighty Avengers, etc. Even my personal favorite, Frannk Quitely has been looking a little looser over on Batman and Robin. It's like "Okay, now that I'm an established pro, I don't have to put as much effort into my art anymore. I'll just let the inker and colorist do all the work." I appreciate what Churchill's doing. He's going against the flow. Plus, his old stuff was a little too Ethan Van Scriver for me.</P> <p>Ethan Van Scriver is an artist I don't care for at all. I feel like his characters are always going to rape me. His pencils have that nice Brian Bolland controlled line, but he's drawing Jim Lee figures with veiney arms and massive crotches. The end result creeps me out.</P>

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:50 p.m. CST

    X-Factor

    by optimous_douche

    If you bailed during Stroman or the Crossover debacle, I applaud your strength.<p> No matter how much that time period pissed me off, I looked lovingly at the book and whispered "I just can't quit you."<p> But this is definitely the most "mature" mutant title on the shelf. Might even make that claim without the word mutant thrown in (at least as far as main streams are concerned).<p> The Summer's rebellion brought the book back to its roots though. Consider coming back.<p> I'm now off to check out Jennifer Love Hewitt's singing vagina. That's what the music box is about right?

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:57 p.m. CST

    Two thumbs up for Peter and Max!!!

    by jimbojones123

    Bill is such a fun wordsmith. I am ready to tackle another of his novels anytime.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 1:59 p.m. CST

    Quitely is his own inker

    by Laserhead

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 2:05 p.m. CST

    Secret Six

    by Psynapse

    Continues to kick ALL KINDS of ass, IMHO.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 2:06 p.m. CST

    The Kid

    by Joenathan

    Maybe he discovered girls?

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 2:16 p.m. CST

    Aha!

    by loodabagel

    So if Quitely is doing his own inks these days, does that mean he'll disappear for a bit and then come back with a bizarre new style, ala Salvador Larroca? I prefer the new Larroca, but the only improvement Quitely needs is getting stuff out on time.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 2:20 p.m. CST

    The artist from Ellis's first Astonishing run

    by Joenathan

    is doing covers for Seige. Still strangely attractive but muddy.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 2:24 p.m. CST

    Simone Bianchi

    by Psynapse

    is who you be thinkin' of.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 2:28 p.m. CST

    I'm with you Joen

    by optimous_douche

    I like and loathe Bianchi's stuff all at the same time.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 2:35 p.m. CST

    Laserhead

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Heart rate? I assure you that I'm perfectly calm. You don't appear to be though. Don't worry, there's nothing that you can say that would raise my heart rate, so hit me with your best shot. I certainly hope I haven't seen your best shot yet, because that would be pathetic. <p> I'm not sure that you actually know what it means to equivocate. It means to avoid committing to what you say. I've never really had that problem. You seem to though. <p> For instance when you say: <p> "I can't think of any artist who includes LESS detail that JRJR." <p> ...and then you come back later and say that Frank Miller doens't count because he doesn't draw a monthly comic, THAT would be the perfect example of equivocation. <p> Or another good example would be insulting someone's illustrative abilities and then coming back and saying "Nobody said that so-and-so couldn't illustrate." <p> Or the best example would be when you equivocate *within the statement itself.* Such as "Name any artist with less detail that doesn't use a cartoony style that uses less detail." That really was your moment of equivocal glory, right there. <p> You know, it would be a lot easier if you would just admit that you misspoke. But apparently you're one of those "fight to the death while simultaneously being totally wrong" guys. Keep grasping at straws. <p> I mean, am I an old, sedentary guy with a bum ticker, or am I a kid? You can't even keep your own insults straight. Not surprising, given the lack of "detail" in your thinking. In fact, I can't think of a single talkbacker with less detail in their thinking than you. <p> So, is your head pure laser with absolutely no grey matter inside? That would make sense. <p> I don't think that you're *pretending* to be dense anymore.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 2:48 p.m. CST

    "Ian Churchill's new style"

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Yeah, it's great for sure. He only drew in that 90's Image-y, Jim Lee style to get work. The stuff he's doing in Hulk is more like what he did before he was forced to change to fit the public's demands. <p> It's as if the comic reading public at large isn't always right and doesn't always know what constitutes good artwork. Or as if they don't even know what they themselves want, and only desire to spew mindless hateration at people who create imaginative entertainment for adolescents. <p> Like "Ultimate" fans, or people who don't think JRJR is great... but no, that could never be true.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 2:54 p.m. CST

    Easy, easy...

    by Laserhead

    I never said you were old, Mr. Skillz, just that you had a bum ticker and lived a sedentary life. I suppose the implication would be that you're an inactive kid. I don't understand what it is I'm supposed to have been wrong about, but it seems to me that you've equivocated by not naming a myriad of artists who use less detail than JRJR. Frank Miller is what you came up with. If I equivocated it was in not refining my initial statement to something like, "You know, this might be slight hyperbole, but I can't think of a single mainstream super-hero artist that works regularly and is considered top tier, whose work looks as slap-dash and undetailed as JRJR's.' In that, yes, I'm guilty. Had I said that, I then wouldn't have left the statement open for comparison with any artist who'd ever lived, in any medium. Well done. My point stands.<p> And really, Mr. Easy, you're the only one who's ever taken any of this personally. Your very first post was insulting, which indicates you're the type of guy to personally insult someone who does not like an artist he likes. Which makes you a douche.<p>Keep praying, but it won't make things any better.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:04 p.m. CST

    Simone Bianchi

    by Joenathan

    When I saw his work on the Seige cover preview, I was like: "shit. I'm going to have to buy it now and hate it and then admit part of it was awesome."

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:11 p.m. CST

    Final word on JR JR

    by tronknotts

    What he's doing is working. The guy's work is very popular, and has been popular for a long time. If a food critic comes into McDonalds and says "These french fries are not up to the gourmet standard!" do you think anyone but him is listening? Do you think McDonald's, or their customers, are going to change because some "food expert" thinks they should? In short, opinions are like assholes; everybody's got one.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:22 p.m. CST

    Reason for lack of "JLH's Box" joke

    by AsimovDiedOfAIDS

    Too easy.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:22 p.m. CST

    Yeah Churchhill dropping the IMAGE style is good

    by George Newman

    He was clinging to that for more than 15 years and or me it just grew more and more grating

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:28 p.m. CST

    JRJR

    by Autodidact

    JRJR's faces all look similar but that is true of many great artists. Frank Quitely for instance. All his people have the same face. Bart Sears had the same problem before he disappeared. <p> JRJR's rendering style is clearly fast and loose. Being an illustrator myself, and having read a metric fuck-ton of comics, it's clear that speed is his main priority. I don't hate his stuff, but aside from the complete lack of detail, I tend to find his panel compositions boring. He is good at the sequential side of comics art though, which besides his father is imo the main reason he has been an industry mainstay for 20 years. <p>I think his style works best for daredevil, punisher, and other earthy titles. I personally can't think of any other "non-cartoony" high profile artist who includes less detail, aside from possibly Tim Sale if you don't count him as cartoony. <p> This is cool, I've had a strong opinion about JRJR for almost 20 years now and never have I taken part in a discussion about it.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:43 p.m. CST

    Really?

    by loodabagel

    Shit, Autodidact, I think we argue about this guy four or five times a year.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:45 p.m. CST

    Steve DIllon...

    by loodabagel

    I don't know if he's less detailed, but he's up there. It'd help if I had some stuff to compare right now.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:46 p.m. CST

    You know who we don't argue about, though?

    by Joenathan

    Loeb... because pretty much everybody agrees: P to the motherfucking U, yo.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:47 p.m. CST

    Laserhead

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Oh, OK, I'm a kid with a bum ticker. Got it. My misunderstanding. Quite to the contrary, I'm middle aged, belong to a gym, and enjoy taking long walks and hikes with my beautiful wife. I wouldn't expect you to understand. Much like you don't understand that in an anonymous internet forum, you don't really know who you're talking to, and to make statements like "You don't know what any industry professional thinks" makes you look stupid and unbelievably arrogant. Not that I think you have a problem with any of that. <p> Your equivocal point stands? Great. I'm not sure that means much. My points all stand as well, they just mean a lot more than yours because I don't equivocate or backpedal the way that you do. <p> What's the point in writing a long list of the many artists that use less detail than JRJR, when you're obviously just going to come back and tell me that none of them count because of some new, equivocal notion that you've pulled out of your butt? I totally served you with Frank Miller, and you couldn't handle it. If I actually gave you a list you might take an AK-47 to work at the post office, and I don't want that on my conscience. <p> Insults? Something obviously got you wound up. I guess that I'll have to live the rest of my life with an AICN talkbacker who's a terrible judge of comic art and an awful, equivocal debater thinking that I'm a douche. Oh well. <p> Keep lasering your head and... uh... yeah, I haven't been on the elementary school playground in a long time, so I'm just not as good at those as you are. <p> I'll have to take my solace in the fact that making fun of my screen name is really all that you bring to the table in this discussion. <p> My favorite part is how you tell me to "calm down" every time now (despite my assurances that I'm perfectly calm) after I did it to you, since you were so obviously the spazzy one in this equation. It's as if you think that simply by saying it, it becomes true. Much like your views on JRJR. <p> Try calling me some more names, because that will make you look like you know shit from Shinola when it comes to art, and it won't make you appear to be a hypocrite at all. <p> Peace!

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:51 p.m. CST

    "pretty much everybody agrees"

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Really, Joenathan? I thought it was because you had no actual arguments. <p> Yeah, I'm pretty sure that was it.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:53 p.m. CST

    Jae Lee too.

    by loodabagel

    Guy's made a career out of covering stuff with shadow. I do like his art though. Why am I doing all the work here?

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:54 p.m. CST

    Dude, you're the person who calls people names

    by Laserhead

    You're the guy who can't say, "I disagree. I like his art." You have to say shit like, "Anyone who doesn't like JRJR's art is a moron, and anyone who didn't like Ultimatum is a whiny Ultimate fan who hates on Loeb. But- sigh -I guess it's a free country and everyone's entitled to their opinion." That you try to cover your insults by pretending to some kind of perspective, or saying Peace, is really kind of sick. You begin by being insulting and proceed to act like you're above such behavior. That's fucked up. I look at this exchange, and you're the guy blowing up and casting aspersions on anyone who doesn't agree with you. Speaking of things being true just by saying it. Yeesh. Pray on.<p>Peace!

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:55 p.m. CST

    I think...

    by loodabagel

    <p>It's because We_pray's the only guy who seems to give a shit about Hulk, Joenathan loves to diss Loeb and everybody else is just indifferent to his work.</P> <p>Yeah, pretty sure that was it.</P>

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:56 p.m. CST

    The Dark Tower minis

    by gooseud

    File that under "Feel like I should like them..........yet don't care". Probably because King ruined me on that series and him as a writer by phoning in the last 3 books of that series.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:56 p.m. CST

    tronknotts

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    I think that in a food analogy, JRJR would rank above McDonald's. If we're using fast food, I would at least make the guy Fatburger or something. Let's be fair. McDonald's would be, like, Mark Bagley, somebody who's really, really bottom of the barrel. <p> I guess that would make Rob Liefeld the 39 cent hamburger stand where you get food poisoning.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:58 p.m. CST

    Did anyoine read that Zombie Vampire fighting thing?

    by gooseud

    The new ones, with the zombie/vampire fighting agency? Was it good?

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:59 p.m. CST

    I thought JR JR was pretty good on Eternals

    by gooseud

    Thats about the extent to which I care one way or the other. His Celestials looked fantastic. That's all I got on that one.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:59 p.m. CST

    Laserhead

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Yeah, I didn't say or do those things. I most certainly haven't been "blowing up." <p> You're delusional. <p> But I guess that's your right. I hope that you can get over it someday. <p> Peace!

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 3:59 p.m. CST

    Hey, that's a nice bio, Mr. Skillz

    by Laserhead

    A beautiful wife you say. Wow. I totally believe you. Do you call her a moron when she has a different opinion than you? In my experience, women don't like that much. I too have a beautiful wife, a cushy academic job, and three published books that made enough money to buy my house and set up my kids' educations. So, there you go. You've got your life. I've got mine. And I'm twice the man you are, because when someone expresses an opinion and explains their reasoning, I don't need to try insulting them. I only insult people who insult me. See the difference? Of course you don't. Ask your beautiful wife to explain it to you.<p>Peace!

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 4:01 p.m. CST

    Ok,

    by Joenathan

    ok, ok, everyone, BUT We_Pray, but... come on.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 4:01 p.m. CST

    loodabagel

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    I think that Homer and one or two others have said that they like Hulk as well. <p> ...and you, you're so indifferent that you had to comment on it, just like last time.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 4:03 p.m. CST

    Lood!

    by Joenathan

    Quiet down.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 4:04 p.m. CST

    Here you go, sigh--

    by Laserhead

    "But hey, it's subjective opinion stuff, and actually knowing about illustration doesn't really enter into it." See, that's your very first response. You don't defend Romita's work, you just imply, Anyone who doesn't like JRJR doesn't know anything about illustration. Do you see how that's insulting?<p>See, you're insulting. I'm right about that.<p>To track yourself blowing up, observe how long your posts quickly become, and how they chiefly contain insults, not, say, some explication on why JRJR is good. See? No? Ask your beautiful wife to give it a read through, and see what she thinks.<p>Peace!

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 4:04 p.m. CST

    Goose

    by Joenathan

    I took me several issues to admit that I didn't like the Gunslinger minis and that the "ending" of the book was just a hollow cheat.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 4:06 p.m. CST

    Ultimatum

    by Laserhead

    No matter what you think of the Ultimate universe- fan, critic, or totally indifferent -Ultimatum is a terrible story. Terribly conceived and executed.<p>But hey, it's subjective opinion stuff, and actually knowing about storytelling doesn't really enter into it. More power to you.<p> Peace!

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 4:08 p.m. CST

    I just like to keep things moving.

    by loodabagel

    You know that. Not that it's necessary at the moment. We_pray and Laserhead's "debate" is great entertainment in itself. Now that Laser's mentioned being a better person, I think We_pray should mention his charity work.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 4:10 p.m. CST

    This is not my beautiful house...

    by tronknotts

    THIS IS NOT MY BEAUTIFUL WIFE! Also, agreed about the Liefeld being a 39 cent burger.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 4:13 p.m. CST

    Laserhead

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    "I only insult people who insult me." <p> Ditto... and often I don't even do it then. <p> Now, maybe you could point out the post where I called you a "moron" for not liking JRJR? <p> Of course you can't. Because I didn't. <p> Again: you're delusional. <p> Deep breaths, we don't need another school massacre on our hands. Have your wife give you a back rub or something, but for jeebus sake don't have another kid.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 4:14 p.m. CST

    Laserhead

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Also: <p> Peace! <p> (You seem to need it)

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 4:21 p.m. CST

    Laser and Skillz

    by Mr.FTW

    Chill out guys, you've both spent more time aruguing about nothing than anything else this week and for what?

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 4:25 p.m. CST

    For our amusement!

    by loodabagel

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 4:35 p.m. CST

    Layla's Powers Were Explained?

    by kungfuhustler84

    I figured that was happening when I read it, but I still have no clue what the hell she is doing. Does someone who understood what was happening wanna explain it? Just the Layla part, please.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 4:37 p.m. CST

    Pray For

    by Laserhead

    See the post titled "Here you go, sigh--" for documentation on how you're insulting out of the gate. See? Instead of offering a rebuttal on the merits of JRJR's work, you simply say that to hold such an opinion means that one doesn't know anything about illustration. Insulting. There you go. Look how calm I am.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 4:44 p.m. CST

    You know what no one has brought up yet?

    by Joenathan

    Hitler.<br><br><br><br>I'm just saying...

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 4:51 p.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by Mr.FTW

    What about cats that look like hitler catsthatlooklikehittle.com

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 5 p.m. CST

    Laserhead

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    "But hey, it's subjective opinion stuff, and actually knowing about illustration doesn't really enter into it." <p> OK, sure. I apologize for that then. I believe that everyone will notice that I never called you a "moron" for your disagreement though. <p> What I don't see is how someone could spaz out so hardcore over what I said. <p> ...and you're using my post length as evidence of "blowing up?" I'm not so sure about that. I would use your actual "blowing up" as evidence of "blowing up" though. <p> Such as "blowing up" simply because of some *implied* or *perceived* insult, and then proceeding to issue a slew of *actual* insults to prove that you're "the better man" or whatever. Good luck with that. <p> Hey, at least you're not a total hypocrite or anything. I'm saying that with complete calm and serenity, by the way. <p> I'm guessing that you won't be having your wife read any of your posts, eh? You could ask her who she thought was the spaz in our exchange. <p> I would totally like to have a legitimate discussion on the merits of JRJR. As soon as you find someone capable of participating, let me know. It certainly isn't you.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 5:15 p.m. CST

    Ultimatum

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Meh. Hardly worth arguing over an "Ultimate" comic, isn't it? I really only wanted to read it to see that the fuss was about, which I still don't get. <p> My only point was that if it is terrible (which seems a little strong, but sure, whatever), it's simply because Loeb was following the guidelines laid out for him by his "Ultimate" predecessors, and that I didn't find it any more or less terrible than anything "Ultimate" that has come before or since. In fact, it seemed to fit the "Ultimate" model quite well, and had all the usual "Ultimate" stuff in it. <p> ...and, you know, that its detractors can't seem to summon up what actually makes it terrible. They just seem to know that it is without any reasoning. <p> The usual.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 5:18 p.m. CST

    Ultimatum

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    I really only wanted to read it to see WHAT the fuss was about. Sorry about the typo.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 5:28 p.m. CST

    Joe (or anyone else): The Dark Tower

    by gooseud

    If you ever really want to be amused and have an hour to kill, go read the Amazon reader reviews for The Dark Tower Book 7. Usually Amazon reviews are pretty civil, with at most a few 1 star "This book sucks" ones thrown in. Thus, people are usually unprepared for the complete Red Lantern style rage that are in those reviews. Generally, the gist is "WHAT THE FUCKING FUCK IS THIS MOTHER FUCKING GODDAMN HORSESHIT?!?!?! THIS BOOK SUCKS THE SWEAT OFF A DEAD MANS TAINT!! WHAT A CHEAT!! RAHHHHHHH!!!!(rage rage anger anger)" (Blood begins to spew uncontrollably from the reviewer's mouth as a red ring comes shooting through the sky to their house). All kidding aside, King has basically said he got hit by that van and immediately lost the urge to finish the series (or anything else for that matter, the van instantly knocked the creative spark right from him, true story, and hes never gotten it back to this day) but people kept bugging him to finish the series, so, in a complete prickish act, out of pure spite and assholish-ness to his long time loyal readers, he said "Ok you want an ending? I'll give you an ending!!" and proceeded to intentionally write the 3 worst books in the history of the English language. Not only did it suck, but it was a cheat on purpose.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 5:29 p.m. CST

    Ultimates are no better or worse

    by gooseud

    then anything else. Some good, some bad, depending on the creative team and the inspiration.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 5:38 p.m. CST

    gooseud

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    I didn't mean to say that "Ultimate" comics were either "better" or "worse" than anything else, just that they have their own paradigm, and Ultimatum followed it to the letter. <p> Like when I told Sleazy that complaining that "Ultimate" comics were immature and relied on shock value was like complaining that your orange juice tastes like oranges. Well, of course it does, it's made from oranges.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 5:56 p.m. CST

    Steve Dillon's women look like his men but in wigs.

    by SleazyG.

    Draws a jaw getting shot off like nobody's bidness, tho.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 6 p.m. CST

    The problem with ULTIMATUM was that my orange juice...

    by SleazyG.

    ...tasted like fucking horseshit.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 6:02 p.m. CST

    And the reason my juice tasted shitty...

    by SleazyG.

    ...is that it was "written" by a hack who did things so stupid, immature and pointless they may Mark Millar look like the mature, thoughtful one.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 6:15 p.m. CST

    Sleazy

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    I was wondering where you went the other week. You never responded to my last post to you. <p> I think that you're missing the point of my well-crafted analogy though. Which was that "immature" and "shock value" are two of the things that the "Ultimate" line is all about. <p> We already know that you didn't like Ultimatum (and that you don't like Loeb). But your reasons for not liking it/him seem to be par for the course with "Ultimate" comics, so maybe you just shouldn't be reading them. <p> Check out some of Loeb's other great comics like The Long Halloween or Spider-Man: Blue, because he can write great non-Ultimate stuff. Your problems seem to be with characteristics that are innate to the "Ultimate" universe, and all that Loeb was doing was following along with what made the comics popular to begin with. <p> Peace!

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 6:27 p.m. CST

    Sorry, but I disagree entirely with your premise.

    by SleazyG.

    It's not a well-crafted analogy, because the Ultimate U was not designed to be either immature or shock-based. It was designed to give the creators freedom to do something different outside of 616 continuity. Please see the initial Millar/Bendis and Ellis runs on ULT. FF, for example, for a very clear example of how they were able to do new, fresh takes with different ideas that were neither shocking nor childish. I think the fans of ULT. SPIDEY will back me up on this as well, and the ULT. TEAM-UP book that also helped launch the line was neither shocking nor immature.<p> So you'd be right...if there were any factual basis for your statement, which there isn't.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 6:46 p.m. CST

    Sleazy

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Yeah, that Ultimate Team-Up book was pretty good. <p> But I think that you're denying reality if you want to claim that "Ultimate" comics are neither shock-based or immature in general. <p> Weren't you the one going off on Mark Millar for being both of those things? Didn't he write the first two arcs of Ultimates? <p> I agree that they're designed to do something different, outside of 616 continuity. <p> Such as making the Avengers a bunch of assholes, making Captain America a bigot, or showing lots of violence. It's just that, to me, those things seem kind of immature and shock-based, and focus on the pseudo-realistic, grim and grittiness that's so popular with the very young. <p> Not to mention making Reed Richards a little kid. Cuz it's "Ultimate" that way! 12 year olds can't identify with regular Reed like they did in the 60's! <p> ...and it's not an arbitrary change at all. Done completely for reasons of artistic integrity, and not part of the youthification and infantilization of our culture. <p> Ah, whatever. <p> Don't really know as much about Ultimate Spider-Man though, since I could never get past the god awful Bagley art. Is there a worse artist out there? I mean, if we're judging solely on getting a book out on time, he might win. But actual quality? Sheesh, what a stinker! Plus I don't want to read a whole issue of Peter Parker: High School Student. I'm more into Spider-Man. <p> To each their own, I always say. <p> Peace!

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 7:15 p.m. CST

    Peter and Max

    by Gelatinousman

    Good to see a book review here. I really like this novel too and I would like to read more. It was great to read about the good fables from the times when they were vilains. I felt like I was reading the comic book most of the time. Great read for Fables fans and fantasy fans alike.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 7:46 p.m. CST

    Ultimate U is NOT like Loeb wrote it

    by Adelai Niska

    Nobody else wrote The Thing as a murderer, for one. Even before Ultimatum, Loeb was turning Ultimates 3 into a mess of random cameos and villains instead of actually developing a single character. Say anything about plot points in Ultiamtes 1 and 2, but every character had a soul. Loeb doesn't do souls, he does colours.

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 8:29 p.m. CST

    Damnit, Sleazy...

    by loodabagel

    <p>I was going to defend the Ultimate Universe after dinner, but then you went and made all the good points for me. Thanks, I guess.</P> <P>I fail to see what's so bad about Mark Bagley's art. It's not the greatest around, but he's usually got good storytelling composition. He does Bendis non-conversations a lot better than most. Most artists will just do the zoom-in on a character's face over a page or two. Bagley manages to mix things up more often. You can tell the characters apart, you know what they're emoting, the action is always decipherable. He's a good artist. Also, I think I'm too young to worry about the Youthification conspiracy. But listen, if it gets out of control, feel free to tell me. I'll put in a word with our leader.</P>

  • Nov. 4, 2009, 9:01 p.m. CST

    Kung-Fu Layla

    by optimous_douche

    She brings back people from the dead, but they are soulless. Kind of like Pet Cemetary.<p> Only reason she knows stuff (and not very well) is because when her future self was pulled through the Vortex she arrives in a time before we see Layla in House of M. While there future Layla uses a future device to implant memories into young Layla.<p> My take anyway.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 12:08 a.m. CST

    "Ultimate U is NOT like Loeb wrote it"

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Not in letter, but definitely in spirit. <p> "Nobody else wrote The Thing as a murderer, for one." <p> Loeb changed things (pun intended), but that's because that's part of the "Ultimate" universe paradigm. Change for the sake of change, sometimes arbitrary, and usually associated with shock value. Check. Loeb nailed that one by making The Thing a murderer. Because that's what makes him "Ultimate." Regular old 616 Thing doesn't murder, but that's because he's old fashioned and not "Ultimate." <p> "Even before Ultimatum, Loeb was turning Ultimates 3 into a mess of random cameos and villains instead of actually developing a single character." <p> Developing a single character? I don't think that's necessary for an "Ultimate" comic either. <p> The whole point of Ultimates was that it was the same, but different. The writers amd artists wouldn't have to create anything of their own, they could simply drag some established icons through the mud. The character development was done in the 60's by the creators, and the writers and artists could simply come in and make changes that would make the characters "cool" and "hip" so that they would resonate with the younger crowd. To deny that the purpose of "Ultimate" comics is to appeal to younger readers is to deny reality. The line was designed to attract younger readers with a new Marvel universe where they didn't have to feel as if they needed to know any continuity that had come before. The funny part is that now those same kids have grown attached to their own little status quo, because "Ultimate" comics have been around for a while now, and the kids are getting upset when changes are made to it. That's what we call ironicalness. <p> "Say anything about plot points in Ultiamtes 1 and 2, but every character had a soul." <p> Yes, and his name was Jack Kirby, but that's neither here nor there. <p> The golden age of comics is eight, I guess. I'm glad that you like Ultimates so much. More power to you. <p> "Loeb doesn't do souls, he does colours." <p> Seems like the younger folks who may know less about comics are having trouble with some of the basics. <p> Loeb does the *scripts* (Or writes the quips, steverodgers). <p> The colorist does the colors (Are you paying attention, Adelai?). <p> The illustrator does the costumes (I'm looking in your direction, loodabagel). <p> I hope that helps. Peace!

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 12:20 a.m. CST

    "the evidence"

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Yeah, how could a piece of shit like this: <p> http://tinyurl.com/yl532qq <p> Ever hope to compete with the awesome grandeur of this: <p> http://tinyurl.com/ylspgur <p> Check and mate! <p> Peace!

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 1:09 a.m. CST

    Being cool is where Loeb went wrong though...

    by loodabagel

    <p>There's nothing cool about his Ultimate work. It's like he looked at the books and said "These Ultimates aren't ultimate enough! Violence and lighting bolts!" No matter how much you try to think that the comics are only about being hip and edgy, (Hip, absolutely. Edgy, not-so-much) they do exist as comics about characters in their own right and Loeb's characterizations were just terrible. The Ultimate line isn't about change for the sake of change, it's about change for the sake of being cool and telling interesting stories. Stories generally have to be well concieved to be interesting. The creators have to care about what they're writing to be cool. Is it possible that Ultimate Thing would murder people? I supopse so, but the 57 or so prior issues of his comic seem to dictate otherwise. For drastic changes like that, characters generally need a little more motivation and depth than Loeb provided.</P> <p>I also fail to see what's so bad about the Bagley page you presented. Would you mind explaining? The two pieces presented have absolutely nothing in common, I'm almost surprised that you thought it was a valid argument. Here's some more JRJR for comparison.</P> <p>http://tinyurl.com/yzbnucl</P> <P>When ROmita's good, he's great, but when he's bad, he's awful. Mark Bagley is consistently capable. I consider myself a fan of neither of their work, nor would I consider myself "check and mated" considering I wasn't even arguing with you about Romita Jr.</P>

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 4:17 a.m. CST

    we_pray_for_mad_skillz re: "the evidence"

    by Regicidal_Maniac

    Oh come on we_pray_for_mad_skillz, now that JRJR piece is not THAT bad, and besides it's an unfair comparison to show it against the subtlety of character and storytelling on display in that page of Bagley's. For a real comparison you should use a page from JRJR's run on Incredible Hulk with Bruce Jones, especially the silent issue, it was great. Granted sometimes JRJR's faces look like everyone's been taking HGH and gone twelve rounds in the ring and THAT particular piece IS very messy and horribly composed but I'd never say that his work was a piece of shit. (BTW, I'm completely aware that you were trying to make the opposite point, but you failed to do so.)

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 7:51 a.m. CST

    Sleazy is right, mad_skillz is wrong.

    by rev_skarekroe

    And mad_skillz may have read all the Ultimate comics, but I don't think he payed much attention (Ult. Reed Richards is about 20 years old for example, not 12). Just like Loeb may have written for the Ultimate U., but he clearly didn't understand it.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 7:59 a.m. CST

    I've always like Mark Bagley's art

    by Psynapse

    And am not afraid to say so.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 8:16 a.m. CST

    huh?

    by Gatsbys West Egg Omlet

    why do so many people care about this column today?

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 8:17 a.m. CST

    also, X-Factor

    by Gatsbys West Egg Omlet

    is the best X title out there and has been for years and years.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 8:19 a.m. CST

    also also, if anyone is still here...

    by Gatsbys West Egg Omlet

    why does Wolfsbane have to leave X-Factor to be in X-Force, but Wolvie can be in like 13 comics every week?

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 8:31 a.m. CST

    Because Marvel hates the Irish....

    by Psynapse

    I mean, who doesn't?

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 8:32 a.m. CST

    JRJR

    by steverodgers

    It's kind of interesting to read all these JRJR comments, I have always liked him, and sort of thought that for the most part everyone else thought he was great as well.... apparently not. What artist you like is obviously pretty much personal taste. However in comics lot of it is about being able to tell a story in an interesting and sequential way, and be able to help the writer get his story across. I think JRJR excels at that, but if panel after panel of cross-hatching and square heads are not for you, then well, it's simply not for you. One thing I always thought was pretty hilarious about JRJR are his gangs are always these multi-racial groups, with like earrings, crowbars, jean jackets and so forth, like the gangs in a Jackie Chan movie, remember Rumble in the Bronx? If I ever saw a gang link that coming my way I would be like, "Wow is America a great country or what?!" Then I would piss my pants and run.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 8:33 a.m. CST

    Wait, she's scottish..

    by Psynapse

    Same diff on the hate scale.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 8:50 a.m. CST

    Joen

    by steverodgers

    Joen glad you liked the review. "Ultimate no more!" came right from all your Hawkeye BBQ jokes. One of these days I want someone to get sick of the TB's and say, "Talkbacker no more!" (breaks laptop over knee)

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 8:54 a.m. CST

    X-Force

    by steverodgers

    Anyone reading this? I really like Yost, so I am tempted to dive into the trades, but I haven't really heard anything about it good or bad.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 9:07 a.m. CST

    X-Force

    by Gatsbys West Egg Omlet

    is cool cuz, like X-factor, you get to look into the less known and less used folks in the X universe. granted its led my Wolvie, the most used, but its nice to see Warpath and Domino getting some good screentime.<p>and the ballsy nature of the team, the whole Scott forming it in secret and yay we can finally kill people thing, is pretty rad.<p>most of the time the art is beautiful. Clayton Crain's stuff is pretty pretty.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 9:08 a.m. CST

    steverodgers, good call about the gangs

    by rev_skarekroe

    Multi-ethnic gangs have been a staple of entertainment for decades, despite the fact that they don't really exist that way. Movies and comics also like to show punk rockers as muggers and thugs to a degree that's way outside reality.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 9:19 a.m. CST

    Psynapse

    by Gatsbys West Egg Omlet

    and they love their Canadians, i guess.<p>its a conspiracy.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 9:22 a.m. CST

    It's ALL a conspiracy...

    by Psynapse

    Otherwise known as 'life'.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 9:25 a.m. CST

    the whole gang thing

    by Gatsbys West Egg Omlet

    happens that way, as i'm sure most people can figure out, so people don't call Marvel (or any other media outlet) racist when all the attackers are black or hispanic or asian, ect ect. its interesting though, cuz you can have an all white team of expert bank robbers or whatever, but all the "street level" thugs have to be multi racial.<p>unless its a bunch of hillbillys, in which case its cool if they're all white.<p>i'm not condemning or condoning, i get why they do it, its just interesting.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 10:37 a.m. CST

    Ult FF

    by gooseud

    as I have stated in these TBs before, was for the first 25-30 issues one of my favorite runs on any comic of the past decade, and I am far from an FF guy. No one packed as much fun awesome "WHOA!" factor into each issue as that book. That is what comics, especially Ultimate comics, are supposed to be.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 10:51 a.m. CST

    Goose

    by Joenathan

    That is not surprising to hear about King. He has long had a vindictive streak. I was always of the opinion that Gunslinger never actually had an ending. What was the one with the whole wizard of oz thing? That one just meandered. <br><br>I am curious about this new Dome one... I wonder if it's just a formula-King book or if it's an honest attempt to claim back to the top of the heap.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 10:58 a.m. CST

    Steve

    by Joenathan

    A couple of talkbacks ago, We_Pray shamed me into declaring myself: "A Loeb-hater no more!" and then broke my keyboard over my head.<Br><Br>but I was fibbing... shhhh!

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 10:59 a.m. CST

    Ultimate Spidey

    by Joenathan

    is still the most consistantly entertaining comic put out today. Great work. Hands down.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 11:01 a.m. CST

    Ultimate FF

    by Joenathan

    was really entertaining for a while, as well. I've never been a big Spider-man or FF reader, I was always X-men and Avengers, but those two books sparked my interest and kept it. I still don't read regular Spidey, but I do read Regular FF. Hickman is kicking ass on that book.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 11:18 a.m. CST

    "........ no more!"

    by steverodgers

    The great thing about that is that it never lasts. Hawkeye always comes back and organizes another kick-ass BBQ, and you always go back to your Loeb hating ways.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 11:35 a.m. CST

    Hey! I've been hatin' since Hush!

    by Psynapse

    Just sayin'....

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 11:46 a.m. CST

    No more!

    by Joenathan

    Thats because Clint can't deny his love of a good BBQ in full costume and I can't deny my love of hating on Loeb. Or green boxing glove jokes.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 11:51 a.m. CST

    WCA BBQs

    by Joenathan

    I bet Moonknight hated them. The guy was basically forced to go to BBQs in all white! <br><br>Plop! "Ugh! Again with dry cleaning! Every fucking week! Just once, I'd like a nice grilled salmon! Just once!"

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 12:17 p.m. CST

    X-Force and more

    by Homer Sexual

    I used to buy X-Force. It has some pluses: Vanisher is a great character and the art was really good. But I got bored, it was all more of the same old Humans hate Mutants, etc, and I dropped it and gave away my issues, so I can't recommend it. I feel it is awesome art and characters but the writing was lame (I usually like Yost). Unrealized potential. <p> So, so true that the gangs are punks and mixed. I will say that at least in Ink, that is not the case. I guess once the entire cast of the comic is the same ethnicity or race, having more realistic gangs is ok.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 12:28 p.m. CST

    Moonknight WCA BBQ

    by steverodgers

    "God damn it Hawkeye. Ribs? Really, there is sauce everywhere... I mean how is Iron Man even going to eat those. My costume looks like a damn baby with a dysentery diaper. This whole thing is just bullshit. What is in this sauce? They are just falling off the bone... damn, Hawkeye can grill. "

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 12:28 p.m. CST

    Talkbacker no more!

    by loodabagel

    I did that once a while ago because Joenathan and some other guy did nothing but argue about Mephisto for five or six months straight.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 12:35 p.m. CST

    lood

    by steverodgers

    Those were dark days. But it's a Brand New Day in the talkback, a Brand New Day.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 12:40 p.m. CST

    Stephen King...

    by loodabagel

    I was going to get into him this summer. I had a friend who loved IT and read it every year and always talked about the great psychological untertones and what not. I told him I'd read it, and felt like I owed it to him when he dropped out of school and moved back north, but I couldn't get past the first section of the book. I almost got to part 2, but then I got to a 150 page chapter about an obnoxious obese woman and I couldn't stand it. I hadn't been as annoyed with a book since Stranger in a Strange Land. (I still might re-read that one though.) It, probably not. SO I said fuck it and went back to Phillip K Dick.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 12:43 p.m. CST

    Brand New Day...

    by loodabagel

    Isn't that a Sting album? Fuck, how do I remember that? Solo Sting sucks.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 12:45 p.m. CST

    Fareal...

    by loodabagel

    They're tying it in with the Videogame, so I think an early December release is plausible. I know what I'm getting my kids for Christmas.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 1:22 p.m. CST

    All I was saying was...

    by Joenathan

    Mephisto is A devil, not THE devil... come on... is that my fault? I don't think so.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 1:42 p.m. CST

    Just read the Dark X-Men preview over at CBR...

    by loodabagel

    Dark Beast is part of regular continuity now? Is this a recent reaction to DC's Kingdom Come thing? Or has this always been going on?

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 1:45 p.m. CST

    Dark Beast

    by Joenathan

    somehow escaped from the Age of Apocalypse way back when, along with Blink and X-man and maybe a few others, and he has been mostly un-used ever since. I think Morrison used him at the end of his run, but I'm not sure if that was Dark Beast or just Beast gone bad.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 1:50 p.m. CST

    Okay, thanks.

    by loodabagel

    But no, the Beast that appeared in "Here Comes Tomorrow" was another future Hank McCoy. He went evil from Kick abuse because Kick was really Sublime in Aerosol form.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 2:03 p.m. CST

    My Take on Romita's Gang renditions

    by optimous_douche

    About half-way down the review: http://www.aintitcool.com/node/35852#1 <p> This was also the review where they used only the first sentance on the back cover of the 2nd or 3rd issue. Totally out of context.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 2:23 p.m. CST

    Lood

    by Joenathan

    Of course it was

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 2:25 p.m. CST

    The link's broken...

    by loodabagel

    But I'm guessing this was a Kick-Ass review? He seems to have been slipping over there. I didn't see any white street gangs, just a Black and Hispanic mix. But I guess that's just because the comic is so fuckin hardcore and in your fuckin face and fuckin brutal and fuckin real. Y'know?

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 2:37 p.m. CST

    CAPTAIN AMERICA WHITE?!?!?!?!?!?

    by DrMorbius

    FUCK YOU MARVEL!<P>Not 'Nother Nickel!

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 3:30 p.m. CST

    Looda: Stephen King

    by gooseud

    IT is actually a good book, although I havent revisited it in years. The last 200 pages of that one are as sad and kinda awesome as it gets. His books ARE detail oriented though, my wife cant get into Stephen King because of all the random details about the characters. I like it, it is what makes me develop an attachment to the characters, but its not everyone's cup of tea.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 3:32 p.m. CST

    I tried.

    by loodabagel

    Is there a more entry-level King book out there? I'd like to read some other stuff, but I have no idea where to start.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 3:58 p.m. CST

    Entry level?

    by Joenathan

    Honestly, most of his stuff, especially his early stuff, is all entry level. They're all fun, fast, and easy. Carrie, Firestarter, Salem's Lot, the Shining, etc. His best book, though, is The Stand, but if big books put you off, don't bother.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 3:59 p.m. CST

    What do you normally read?

    by Joenathan

    King isn't my favorite, but he's someone I've always considered pretty universal, like the good version of Dan Brown, if you will. But if you don't like his style, and really, IT is a pretty good example of his style, then what do you prefer?

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 4:01 p.m. CST

    King

    by Mr.FTW

    I don't mind the details it's the obsessive details. I tried to read both Throught the eyes of the Dragon and Misery and couldn't finish either because the comes a point in the excessive detailing that you lose intrest. Like in Through the Eyes of the Dragon I didn't need multiple pages of description about the King picking his nose and farting. Details help bring the world and characters to life but King goes a little too overboard at times. But like Goose said it's not everyone's cup of tea. If only people could take that attitude when "discussing" something like Loeb or Ultimates.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 4:19 p.m. CST

    Yeah...

    by Joenathan

    If only everyone would just admit that Loeb sucks.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 4:30 p.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by Mr.FTW

    I set them uo you knock them down

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 4:31 p.m. CST

    Y'know what Loeb book didn't suck? CAP: WHITE.

    by SleazyG.

    Oh, wait...

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 5:52 p.m. CST

    Homer/Gatsby

    by steverodgers

    Thanks for your thoughts on X-Force. I think I am going to try the first trade.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 6:03 p.m. CST

    "IT" was fine....

    by Psynapse

    Until the reader and King both realized that he had no idea how to address the insane ideas he had cooked up and decided to take you on a tour of the literary muses's goddamn lower GI tract in an attempt to end the story.

  • Nov. 5, 2009, 10:52 p.m. CST

    Better Than King, Same Flaws With Endings

    by Buzz Maverik

    T.E.D Klein author of THE CEREMONIES and DARK GODS. Modern Lovecraftian stuff, thankfully not directly referencing HPL or the Cthulhu mythos. Only wrote two books, as far as I know. And THE CEREMONIES simply falls apart at the end, much like King of that era Stephen King would write 1,100 pages of build up to one paragraph where they practically just shot the monster and went home.

  • Nov. 6, 2009, 7:31 a.m. CST

    Cap White/the Twelve

    by steverodgers

    A couple of writers... half-asleep.

  • Nov. 6, 2009, 11:46 a.m. CST

    The Twelve...

    by loodabagel

    Goddamnit. I forgot that comic existed.

  • Nov. 6, 2009, 12:01 p.m. CST

    Books...

    by loodabagel

    <p>I read a Stephen King short story collection once, and the best one was actually the longest, but I think it worked because it like a King novel condensed to it's basest form. The story in question was about a schoolteacher who buries alive a mob boss on a stretch of Nevada highway. Very scary stuff.</P> <p>But as far as other books go, I've not a fan of description. After having to read Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville and James Joyce in high school, I gotta say that I'm over it. I like things to move a little bit faster. Having said that, I'm a fan of Phillip K Dick, Donald E Westlake, Kurt Vonnegut, Neil Gaiman novels, Nabokov, Oscar Wilde and Mark Twain. I like writers with a better sense of humor than King. I remember moments in It where I felt like a joke had just been told, but it wasn't funny, it was just uncomfortable. </P> <p>The funny thing about Neil Gaiman is that I read all his novels, 1602 and The Books of Magic and watched all his movies before I got to Sandman. They had all his books at the library so they were free for the taking. Come to think of it, I even went down to the Childrens' Section one day and read The Wolves in the Wall. I'm working on collecting Sandman right now though. I've already got half the series, but I'm not going in order. I'm just picking stuff up where it's cheap, so I've only gotten through Book 1. </P>

  • Nov. 6, 2009, 1:37 p.m. CST

    This has been a good year for kids movies...

    by loodabagel

    And there's still a few good looking ones coming out.

  • Nov. 6, 2009, 9:33 p.m. CST

    Who The Hell Am? by Philip K. Dick

    by Buzz Maverik

    Looda, have you read this one? I'd say it was PKD's best, written after he saw BATTLE BEYOND THE STARS and thought his vacum cleaner was talking to him. Did anybody read Stephen Kings THE STUFFING? It takes place in a homeless shelter on Thanksgiving Day, when all the cooked turkeys come to life and try to carve the dinner guests. Except they can't, because they have those little stumpy wings. There's an 80 page chapter in which somebody in a Maine dialect describes how best to sharpen a knife that rivals the rug beating instructions from DOLORES CLAIBORNE. And may I say, that Jeph Loeb's best Marvel color title (or colour as our British overlords would say) was THE WASP: BLACK & BLUE in which Jan looks back over her early adventures in a letter to Hank's right hook.

  • Nov. 6, 2009, 9:34 p.m. CST

    What Happened To My Paragraphs?

    by Buzz Maverik

    I did the things. Or not.

  • Nov. 6, 2009, 9:35 p.m. CST

    I'm Gonna Make A Fake Horror Documentary

    by Buzz Maverik

    Get me some serious dough. Let's see. It'll be about three disgraced scientists who catch ghosts for a living...

  • Nov. 7, 2009, 11:45 a.m. CST

    What happened to my paragraphs...

    by loodabagel

    I remember that one. A pretty good existential dilemma PKD based on an old James Joyce story.

  • Nov. 10, 2009, 1:19 a.m. CST

    What happened to all-weeking...

    by loodabagel

    Or Mad_Skillz? I slammed that guy with my last rebuttal. I was so eager for the comeback.

  • Feb. 15, 2010, 4:14 a.m. CST

    klysWa

    by TmvEqK

    iQWapH <a href="http://lqyehv.com/ ">klysWa</a>

  • Feb. 15, 2010, 4:15 a.m. CST

    WDCRHQ

    by TmvEqK

    DHoDjQKa <a href="http://rvkbao.com/ ">WDCRHQ</a>