Movie News

Gerard Butler tells Quint who he's playing in Ralph Fiennes' Shakespeare adaptation of CORIOLANUS!!!

Published at: Oct. 22, 2009, 10:40 a.m. CST by quint

Ahoy, squirts! Quint here. I just got off the phone with Gerard Butler who is still out there beating the drum for the really fun LAW ABIDING CITIZEN, pushing for its second weekend. During the chat he revealed a bit of news about appearing in the Ralph Fiennes directed film version of William Shakespeare’s tragedy Coriolanus. I read online that he also mentioned it this morning during a morning news program appearance, but he didn’t mention who he would play there… So I’m the special one. Eat that, morning news! Here’s the quote from the man himself!
“It looks like I might be doing Coriolanus, the Shakespeare play, the movie version… the adaptation of. Ralph Fiennes will be directing and playing Coriolanus and I’d be playing Tullus Aufidius his nemesis!”
Of course he said “nemesis” with the evil voice on, which made it sound even more badass. If you’re not familiar with the original works, the story follows a Roman General named Gaius Martius Coriolanus who is at battle with Tullus Aufidius, the leader of the Volscian army. Aufidius hates the shit out of Martius, but ends up working with him after Martius is banished from Rome after a brief, failed political career. It seems Coriolanus is a bit of a dick and treats the average citizen with contempt. Unless they were in the army they’re not worthy of opinion. So, naturally, he’s banished and ends up teaming up with the Volscians to get his revenge on Rome. So, that’s in the works and Butler is playing the Volscian General Aufidius. The full interview should be up by this weekend. Keep an eye out for it! -Quint quint@aintitcool.com Follow Me On Twitter



Readers Talkback

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  • Oct. 22, 2009, 10:40 a.m. CST

    This Could Be Good

    by cymbalta4thedevil

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 10:42 a.m. CST

    My First First

    by cymbalta4thedevil

    and it's a Shakespeare thread! This is one of his plays I've never gotten around to reading.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 10:56 a.m. CST

    How long will it take ...

    by TheCap

    ... this talkback to fill up with "Cory Old Anus" and other sphincter jokes ? I'll start the stopwatch ... now ! That is all.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 10:58 a.m. CST

    Whose Anus?

    by cookylamoo

    Cornhole my Anus?

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 11:02 a.m. CST

    I like it already.

    by LoneGun

    CORIOLANUS seems to be one of the lesser talked about Shakespeare dramas, though it's a really great play. The cast for this (with also William Hurt and Vanessa Redgrave) sounds killer.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 11:03 a.m. CST

    Cap

    by Quint

    That didn't take long. What was the stopwatch count? 80 seconds?

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 11:16 a.m. CST

    Ask him about a sequel to RocknRolla

    by Judge Briggs

    Loved that movie and would like to more stories from that world!

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 11:32 a.m. CST

    Who will play his brothers?

    by Chakraborty

    FURRIOLANUS, HARRIOLANUS, and STINKIOLANUS.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 11:47 a.m. CST

    Awesome!

    by Phimseto

    And yeah...I'd like to know about when "The Real RockNRolla" will be coming out!

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 11:55 a.m. CST

    Ralph Fiennes as Coriolanus? COOL!!!

    by AsimovLives

    Coriolanus is one of the most underrated plays by ol' Bill (Mr Shakespeare!!!).<br><br>Funny enough, the play doesn't say that Coriolanus is at fault because he treats the plebes as scum (the play has an aristicatic bias), but becaus ehe loses themper easily and he is too coy and proud to show his value in public. And by that, it means, showing his scars of war. That's why romans used togas, so they could show off their scars from battle. That was the way the romans had to show to others that they were patriots and did their civic duty in fighting the wars for Rome. Coriolanus refuses to show his scars, and from then, his fall starts.<br><br>Also, many say that Coriolanus, more then Hamlet itself, is the real character created by Shakespeare whire the character as a real oedipus complex. Coriolanus, while a real war machine and a real terminator in battle, he is a total mommy boy. He is defined by what his mother wants of him, and what she tells him to do. Coriolanus's mother, think Polly Walker's Atia of the Julii in the TV series Rome and you get an idea.<br><br>Coriolanus is a very good play, it has it all: high drama, set in ancient rome (even before the Empire), it has mad mobs, intrigue, war... the works. Can't wait for the movie.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 12:16 p.m. CST

    Who are the ad wizards...

    by wampa 1

    ...that came up with this one?

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 12:17 p.m. CST

    Vin Diesel IS Timon of Athens.

    by cookylamoo

    Stay way from my cave, Motherfucker.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 12:34 p.m. CST

    Queue the screaming Butler fangirls...

    by erik_a

    ...in 5...4...3...2...

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 12:38 p.m. CST

    Sounds like this could be awesome...

    by TheWaqman

    also RockNRolla was shit. Ritchie sucks.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 12:39 p.m. CST

    Wow, i agree with cymbalta4thedevil

    by AsimovLives

    Must be a first.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 12:41 p.m. CST

    TheWaqman

    by AsimovLives

    Then you must have very little hopes for Sherlock Holmes, don't you?

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 12:44 p.m. CST

    wampa1

    by moviemo

    Is that all you ever say? Actually, the "ad wizard" who "came up" with this one was Shakespeare, a few hundred years ago, you moron. Try using that trite saying when it actually makes sense next time...

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 1:06 p.m. CST

    Seen Fiennes live as Coriolanus

    by CaseyMcCall

    He's is awesome in the part. Can't wait for this movie version.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 1:16 p.m. CST

    Gee, I just got off the phone with Gerald, too...

    by HarryCalder

    ...And he says he's "really, really sorry about 'Gamer'... don't know what I was thinking." He's so hard on himself sometimes...

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 1:19 p.m. CST

    Sherlock Holmes of the Carribean?

    by TheWaqman

    No I'm not really excited for that. I might see it in theatres, after I watch Avatar twice or something. But only because of Downey Jr. and Jude Law. Good casting. Baaaaad design choice. "Lets make Sherlock Holmes a kung-fu fighting action star, and add some light-hearted POTC humor". Depp can carry a crap film like this with sheer charisma, I don't think these guys can. It will be a success for sure. But a successful failure, Conan Doyle's character will be ruined permanently.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 1:43 p.m. CST

    I love how "really fun" has become a nice way of saying

    by solanine

    "complete fucking garbage." See: GI Joe

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 1:43 p.m. CST

    After all the other shitty movies...

    by TheMarineBiologist

    ... I can safely assume the character of Sherlock Holmes has already been ruined permanently.<P> I am slightly optimistic for this one, however know full well that this probably won't do the character justice.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 1:54 p.m. CST

    Waqman

    by Judge Briggs

    Judging a book from its cover, I see? You haven't seen the movie so why are you talking shit about it? There are plenty of Ritchie fans... so fuck off.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 1:58 p.m. CST

    Waqman

    by bah

    I don't want to have this argument again, so I'll just leave it at: Holmes practiced martial arts, was a contender as a boxer, got into gunfights, and the stories ran the emotional gamut from hilariously slapstick to heartbreaking.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 2:32 p.m. CST

    TheMarineBiologist

    by AsimovLives

    Then i guess you never saw the Granada TV Sherlock Holmes series with Jeremy Brett, have you?

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 2:34 p.m. CST

    I'm waiting for the idiots who will say the movie is not suppose

    by AsimovLives

    to be Shakespeare.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 2:34 p.m. CST

    It's not supposed to be Shakespeare!!

    by AsimovLives

    Oh wait, IT IS Shakespeare!! Fuck!

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 2:38 p.m. CST

    what country pronounces Ralph as Ray

    by Meadowe

    That's one gay ass country.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 2:39 p.m. CST

    About Fiennes as Coriolanus

    by AsimovLives

    I don't doubt for a moment Fiennes ability to play Coriolanus. He is one of the msot famous actor for playing the part in the theater. Thing is, i think the play does hint that Coriolanus is a younger man, maybe even in his mid 20s. Which for the standards of ancient rome means you were a fully mature adult, since romans reached maturity at age 16. In his mid 20s, Coriolanus would be a 10 years war veteran. Also, because he's a patrician (nobleman), he would had assumed high ranking positons from the start, and wouldn't be too out of normal to be a general's second in command at mid 20s.<br><br>But maybe i misunderstood the play and Coriolanus is indeed supposed to be an older man of 40s.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 2:40 p.m. CST

    Meadowe

    by AsimovLives

    Aparently in Wales they say "Ralph" as "Rafe".

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 2:41 p.m. CST

    "Coriolanus" was actually about demagoguery

    by _V_

    it's one of Shakespeare's most morally gray works: It's not just "Coriolanus = elitist, bad!" Coriolanus *openly* doesn't like playing "the game" of democracy, is *not* a good public speaker much less a manipulator, but wants to be elected based on his good war record. Meanwhile, the so-called "democracy" of Rome has turned into more of a mob-ocracy or demogoguery: conspiring Senators don't care about the "common masses" of the working class either, no more than Coriolanus does: the difference is that they're manipulators that know how to "play the game", and dupe the crowds into thinking they're on their side Like how politicians do the usual rounds of baby-kissing, or saying "Washington is turning into a bunch of fascists who want to take over your healthcare! Yeah I'm a wealthy conservative industrialist...but I'm on the side of YOU, the little guy!" etc. etc. Think of Coriolanus as almost a Gordon Gecko of politics kind of guy: he's jarring because he doesn't sugarcoat a word of what he's talking about. He believes *exactly* the same thing as the Senators, the difference is that he makes *absolutely no attempt* to shy away from the fact that he's openly an elitist....but he's an elitist because he's proven himself to be a brilliant military leader; so at least in terms of "international skills" he's very well qualified. Coriolanus is actually honest about this and not a good public speaker. So when they have the big election to be "consul" (basically Rome had two consuls, each getting to be effectively king for a one year term).......Coriolanus *does not* win by a landslide. He's got a lot of faults, not everyone likes him for his elitist attitude, but *enough* people recognize that he's good at his job that they're willing to overlook that, and he's winning the election anyway. ***So the corrupt Senators decide to basically rig the election so Coriolanus will lose, then sabotage a public appearance of his into a big anti-democracy outburst to make him look bad. So who was the bad guy here, Coriolanus? He didn't rig an election, nor was he trying to do what the conservatives tend to do these days: convince the lower classes that they're on their side when really they're not. It was one of Shakespeare's most controversial and morally gray works ever; the result being that its not very popular for general consumption. It's as if you took that one moment from Julius Caesar where Mark Antony says "yeah Caesar was wielding dictatorial power...but he was doing it honestly for the benefit of the state, and now the corrupt senators like Cassius who don't really care about you either murdered him in cold blood...so who's really wrong here?"...as if you took that moment and turned it into an entire play. Heaven help us if they simply villify Coriolanus in the movie.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 3:01 p.m. CST

    Starring Sasha Grey.

    by drompter

    I mean, she is a mainstream actress now, isn't she?

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 3:10 p.m. CST

    Aint it Cool?

    by MacReady452

    Nope.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 3:29 p.m. CST

    _V_

    by AsimovLives

    Very good, my friend, very good.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 3:31 p.m. CST

    What really suprises me is that there's some people here

    by AsimovLives

    who know and like and want to talk about Shakespare, and even know about one of his more obscure plays. Usually, this is the place where people who know shit about shakespeare say stuff like "this movie is supposed to be fun, not shakespare". As if Ol' Bill never intented his plays to be fun! In the world of Christian Bale, "Fucking ass!"

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 5:37 p.m. CST

    Is he a good enough actor

    by CherryValance

    to go toe to toe with Ralph? Has he been in anything decent? His movies have been mostly popcorn movies right?

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 5:45 p.m. CST

    Coriolanus

    by Hipshot

    Saw a theater in the round performance of this at UCIrvine a few months back. I'd read the play, but honestly didn't remember dick about it. Even with such a haphazard student production, it was powerful stuff. "Timon of Athens"? Never seen it mounted, just re-read it, and that is one misanthropic piece of work. Wow. As for Holmes, yeah, he was supposed to be a badass: practiced "Baritsu" (a form of Jiu-Jitsu), boxing, stick-fighting, and hung out in the toughest, nastiest parts of London. Could un-bend a fireplace poker only a giant could bend. If every other movie has focused on his intellectual aspect, what in the world is wrong with one single film exploring this side of his legend?

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 6:41 p.m. CST

    I thought it was pronounced "Rafe" Fiennes.

    by 3D-Man

    No?

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 6:42 p.m. CST

    Oops nevermind!

    by 3D-Man

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 7:16 p.m. CST

    AsimovLives

    by cymbalta4thedevil

    Actually you and I would probably agree on quite a few things. I just like busting your chops about JJ Abrams Star Trek movie. <br /><br />Hopefully they will do a good job on this or AsimovLives will be very angry...<br /><br />"Fuck Coriolanus! Fuck him in his anus!This is not Shakespeare! This is Shitspeare!"

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 9:09 p.m. CST

    When is Gerard Butler going to fuck off already?

    by God's Brother

    just looking for a ballpark...

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 9:20 p.m. CST

    Re: CherryValance

    by The Grug

    The man has got chops, check out 'Dear Frankie' or 'Butterfly on a Wheel' for a better look at them.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 9:34 p.m. CST

    I heard Jettl93 gave vocal tips to Butler for his work on BLACK

    by BillboeFett

    And that reminds me of the time I was sitting in the stickyfoot theater watching the WATCHMEN. I was sitting in the theater next to C-No and gay Tom Cruise, I turned to C-No and said "that looks like Jettl93 quality work". Kurt Russell then laughed, so I knew it was ok.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 10:11 p.m. CST

    Seen The Play At

    by gooseud

    the Shakespeare Theater in D.C. a few years back, it really is fantastic, one of my favorites of the dozen or so I've seen there. King John is another underrated, virtually never performed work.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 11 p.m. CST

    I just dropped a Shitspeare

    by MacReady452

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 11:20 p.m. CST

    Mom

    by Henry Fool

    I can't wait for this project. I read 'Coriolanus' in college. I'm really curious as to who Fiennes will cast as Cori's mother. She's an awesome character, very much in the mold of Lady Macbeth.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 11:35 p.m. CST

    Let's not forget

    by liquiddark

    This is the Shakespeare play where the main character walks into a building full of sword-wielding bad guys and kills them to a man. It's the ultimate proof that Shakespeare wanted to write action movies.

  • Oct. 22, 2009, 11:40 p.m. CST

    Cool people who've played Big C

    by liquiddark

    - Morgan Freeman - Christopher mother fucking Walken

  • Oct. 23, 2009, 12:05 a.m. CST

    CORNHOLEMYANUS?

    by Ironhelix

    what?

  • Oct. 23, 2009, 4:18 a.m. CST

    Well...

    by PoeticWarriortoo

    fuck... Ironhelix already beat me to it. No interest in watching Fiennes fight a guy that is in every way his superior.

  • Oct. 23, 2009, 4:58 a.m. CST

    RAFE OR RAY he's fallen off big time

    by Meadowe

    And I'm not saying that out of spite. Seems like an ok dude, wasn't he in Strange Days? At least he hasn't fallen off so far like his bro who has to star in some quasi vanity project from a guy who had little to do writing The Dark Knight but the brothers Nolan threw him a bone. Anyway, good luck Ralph, whether or not your name rhymes with "gay" or "waif."

  • Oct. 23, 2009, 5:39 a.m. CST

    cymbalta4thedevil

    by AsimovLives

    I doubt Ralph Fiennes slouches on a movie adaptation of a Shakespeare play. The man loves Shakespeare with the same intensity and passion that Kenneth Brannagh does. Which is a lot, baby! Something tells me that Fiennes' Coriolanus could be as good or close to as good a movie as Brannagh's first, Henry V. And that's a lot.

  • Oct. 23, 2009, 5:56 a.m. CST

    Henry Fool

    by AsimovLives

    Vanessa Redgrave will play Coriolanus' mother. And as formidable actresses goes, you can't get more formidable. You so can easily buy her as a bossy roman matron.

  • Oct. 23, 2009, 6:56 a.m. CST

    Oh EXCELLENT

    by Sepulchrave

    I'm so glad when someone like Fiennes decides to do a proper cinematic treatment of a lesser-known Shakespeare. Why Branagh keeps fooling about with inane comedies like As You Like It and Love's Labour's Lost is beyond me. Coriolanus is a great play and great tragic hero. I was pleased with Julie Taymor's ghastly Titus Andronicus, which was as gross, flawed and lavish as the play, and I also like Trevor Nunn's fine Twelfth Night: a troubling and shadowy comedy.

  • Oct. 23, 2009, 7:01 a.m. CST

    Oh and there is only ONE Sherlock Holmes

    by Sepulchrave

    and that was Brett. A good Holmes needs a good Watson, not a bumbling oaf like Nigel Bruce.

  • Oct. 23, 2009, 7:50 a.m. CST

    Branagh

    by gooseud

    gets a pass for everything he has ever done because he made Henry V, one of my top 5 favorite movies of any genre and required viewing for......well, pretty much everyone. Every single scene in that movie, EVERY scene, is not just good but pure gold.

  • Oct. 23, 2009, 11:10 a.m. CST

    gooseud

    by AsimovLives

    Great to see another fellow who also admires Brannagh's Henry V. That movie put the awe in me. I still kick myself for not seeing it at the theaters when i had the chance.

  • Oct. 23, 2009, 11:14 a.m. CST

    Sepulchrave

    by AsimovLives

    I also think that Titus Andronicus is a terribly underrated play by Shakespeare. The good thing this days seems that his more underrated and obscure plays are getting a renascense and a rediscovery. And coriolanus is one such, for the longest time it was put aside as one of the minor plays. Nonsense! Coriolanus is the shit! And as Shakespeare's plays goes, it might evne be one of the most cinematic friendly, due to the notorious absense of soliloquies. to play Coriolanus, an actor needs to do good internalized subtle acting, and Ralph Fiennes is a master of that.

  • Oct. 23, 2009, 1:41 p.m. CST

    Titus

    by Sepulchrave

    has foreshadows of many other, greater, plays, from Othello to Lear. But it's a crazy teenage play; a gruesome Revenger's Tragedy with long dreary passages of lyrical descriptive verse; purple and leaden. It needs serious cuts when performed. Coriolanus is a mature play; balancing speech and action, crisp stony images and very well balanced. It's not underrated, just understaged and not as instantly familiar as, say, Macbeth or Julius Caesar. But it's a BIG play. Titus is pretty minor stuff by comparison. intellectually it's very crude and manipulative; it revels in guts and rape. Kids like that stuff.

  • Oct. 24, 2009, 12:03 a.m. CST

    Shakespeare

    by dancetothebeatofthelivingdead

    Just how many plays like this are out there? <br> <br> I seriously thought I had read most of Shakespeare's work and this one comes out of left field in that I've never even heard of this one; it doesn't even ring a bell. <br> <br> I only read the first ten or so posts so if this has been or is already being talked about forgive me but I must know how this stacks up with the masterpieces. <br> <br> Is it a comedy or tragedy, what is the plot and is it a romance or a bloodbath. Or even perhaps a romance set in the middle of a bloodbath. <br> <br> I really wish kids today were forced to read more Shakespeare and taught from a very young age to interpret it themselves. Ah, the American public school system, where you will read Romeo and Juliet before moving on to another bland and irrelevant piece of short story "literature." I swear to God, the only thing that ever held me back from reading was school. Once I was old enough to read anything of substance on my own, I realized that curricular and dry tradition had sucked the joy of imagination and reading words out of just about every kid in school.

  • Oct. 24, 2009, 5:47 a.m. CST

    Coriolanus stacks up very well.

    by Sepulchrave

    The theme is the ruin of a great man through well-deserved but excessive pride. Coriolanus is a great and seasoned general and the savior of Rome. But he is from a great family and is intensely proud, scorning the adulation of the rabble, the satisfactions he gets from his career are entirely personal; to the point that the only man on Earth he truly respects (to the point of a weird manly infatuation) is his great rival of the Volces (the character that Gerard Butler plays). The hoi polloi of Roma are depicted as an ignorant and dissatisfied mob who rebel aginst their rightful masters, the patricians, of whom Gaeus Martius (later Coriolanus) is the great example. A Machiavellian faction in the Senate try to exploit this problem by demanding (on behalf of the people, who they could care less about) that Coriolanus submit to (in his eyes) a humiliating ritual of public thanks. Coriolanus cannot do this, no matter how hard he tries and is driven out of the city by his perfect pride. His hatred for his ignoble fellow citizens drive him into the arms (literally and militarily) of his enemy. The play is about the roman virtue of righteous pride and the vice of unrighteous hubris and the way that great virtues can, through excess, become evil. it's also a very unsettling meditation on the mob-aspects of democracy.