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AICN COMICS REVIEWS: FANTASTIC FOUR! BATMAN&ROBIN! DAN DARE! FVZA! MANGA X-MEN! dot.comics! Preview of THE MIGHTY! & MUCH MORE!


#16 8/26/09 #8
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Hey folks, Ambush Bug here. If any of you noticed, this week we didn’t have a Shoot the Messenger column (hey, a couple people noticed), so I wanted to drop this tidbit of news for you before we dive into the reviews.
Turns out LOADED BIBLE, Tim (HACK/SLASH) Seeley’s awesome story about Jesus fighting vampires in the post-Apocalyptic future, is going to be made into an illustrated film a la Matt Pizzolo’s GODKILLER. Both Tim and Matt were part of my panel at the last San Diego Comic Con and I can tell you, both are as cool as they are talented. Can’t wait to see how this LOADED BIBLE news develops. Look for the whole story here.

Secondly, we have a preview of a book that comes out today from DC. THE MIGHTY has shaped up to be a helluva mystery AND a helluva good time. Check out this preview of the book.
THE MIGHTY #8 Writer: Peter J. Tomasi & Keth Champagne Art: Chris Samnee Publisher: DC Comics Release Date: This Wednesday!



Oh yeah and there was some news about Marvel being bought by a mouse or something….

The Pull List (Click title to go directly to the review) FANTASTIC FOUR #570 BATMAN: THE WIDENING GYRE #1 DAN DARE: VOYAGE TO VENUS Vol. 1 & 2 TINY TITANS #19 WEST COAST BLUES OGN GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY #17 FVZA #1 BATMAN & ROBIN #3 Big Eyes For the Cape Guy presents X-MEN: MISFITS V1 dot.comics presents… CHEAP SHOTS!

FANTASTIC FOUR #570

Writer: Jonathan Hickman Artist: Dale Eaglesham Publisher: Marvel Comics Reviewed by Humphrey Lee

Maybe I am just starting to become officially jaded about my comic books, but lately it seems like there have been less and less announcements out of the cons and newsfeeds about new books or new runs from the Big Two that have really got me excited in the past year or so. I'm not a complete cynic, calling doom and gloom on the industry or any of that jazz, I just happen to think that after starting off this decade/century with such a rush of fresh ideas and excitement in what has probably been the best stretch for comics well, ever, we're starting to see the industry wind down again. We still get a good flow of those announcements though, those ones you read in convention coverage that make you exclaim "Fuck yeah I'm buying that!" when you catch the creative team, premise, etc, and when this run on FANTASTIC FOUR by Hickman and Eaglesham was announced at NYCC earlier this year I definitely gave a little "fuck yeah" of my own at that piece of news. I even did a little fist pump. Yeah, I'll own up to that. And now the wait is over for what I honestly think has been the creative endeavor I've been looking forward to the most all summer (well, outside of STUMPTOWN coming in a couple months) and I'm so glad to say that this book is definitely the shining example of what we need to get out of whatever rut we find our beloved medium in.
Given, we had a nice sampling of what to expect from Mr. Hickman at the helm with his DARK REIGN: FF mini just a bit ago, which was filled with all sorts of good, old-fashioned, high concept sci-fi (spelled with 'i's, like it should be) and some fun character moments. A great sign of what we have here in the debut issue, which has both those elements in spades, and works the "First Family" angle a good bit as well. Now, I will admit to a little bit of, I don't want to say skepticism at first, but it did take a solid half of the issue for me to start to get into what he was throwing at us. The opening two pages, a flashback into Reed's childhood that shows the building of his determined stature, are very grabbing indeed, but the next half dozen or so pages following it, a conflict involving the Wizard and his "sons" (accelerated clones of himself) felt a little... "disjointed" is what I would say. There was some cool fighting and whatnot, but it somewhat raced through the fight, to the revelation of the cloning, to Reed having a conversation with the Wizard himself about Godliness. Interesting stuff, but played out a little too quick for my tastes. But, as soon as the fisticuffs end the real good stuff begins... with a bedtime story.
The second half of this issue shows a lot of what I thought the DR mini was a little lacking in, and that's the family moments. Within a handful of pages, Hickman is able to establish a wonderful grasp on the heart of this book and what has made this title different from all the tights and tussle books as long as it has been around. And it also gives more weight behind Reed's motivation to revisit his "Bridge" invention from the DR mini, a device that gives him access to countless alternate realities, and that he theorizes will give him the necessary information from observing them to fix the problems he perceives as plaguing his own. A roomful of Reed Richards from multiple realities and the "Holy Shit!" moment of three of them carrying around their own Infinity Gauntlets later, and you have yourself a situation where I want the next issue pretty much now, another rarity I find myself experiencing these days.
And since I just spent three paragraphs more or less extolling the virtues of the brains of the operation, I'd feel remiss if I didn't do the same for the hands (and probably with an assist on the brains as well I'd imagine). I've been a fan since I first ran across his work on the last incarnation of DIAL H FOR HERO but it's an easy call that this is hands down the best I've ever since his work. The lines are so soft, and packed with so much expression and detail, it's actually astounding. And if there was ever any one flaw that I perceived of his work, it's that I always thought his figures were a bit bulky, even for the muscles and spandex type books, and that is completely reined in here. Yeah, Reed is just a smidge buffer than you'd think of him as, but oh well. For the sheer excellence that is the overall quality of his body of work, this is nothing but the nittiest of nitpicks. Honestly, this is probably my favorite art on a mainstream title just outside of what Quitely and JHW3 are doing on the Bat-books right now.
There's just something about an FF run that gets it, though, that really gets me excited, and it's obvious that Hickman gets this book. I love the interaction between the characters, I love the action, and I love the high sci-fi, and we get every one of these in spades. This title isn't one I buy all the time, it takes a special creative team that I think has the ability to take what makes it special and bring it out on the page to get me interested in it, and I have to say this is the most invested I've been in this book since the Waid/Ringo days, which I think is about as much praise as you can heap on a book. Obviously that's a big order to live up to, and we're just getting started here, but given what I've seen so far I have nothing but high hopes that we'll get something as special as that classic run.
Humphrey Lee has been an avid comic book reader going on fifteen years now and a contributor to Ain't It Cool comics for quite a few as well. In fact, reading comics is about all he does in his free time and where all the money from his day job wages goes to - funding his comic book habit so he can talk about them to you, our loyal readers (lucky you). He's a bit of a social networking whore, so you can find him all over the Interwebs on sites like Twitter, The MySpaces, Facebookand a Blogger Account where he also mostly talks about comics with his free time because he hasn't the slightest semblance of a life. Sad but true, and he gladly encourages you to add, read, and comment as you will.

BATMAN: THE WIDENING GYRE #1

Writer: Kevin Smith Artist: Walt Flanagan Inker: Art Thibert Colorist: Art Lyon Publisher: DC Comics Reviewer: Matt Adler

Kevin Smith’s latest foray into the Bat-verse takes him into some familiar Batman territory, but also provides an exploration of some interesting themes, and a tone that is somewhat of a departure from the current Batman comics. Smith’s last Batman effort, BATMAN: CACOPHONY (also with longtime friend and artist Walt Flanagan) faced some criticism both for the writing and the art, as well as behind-the-scenes issues having to do with Smith’s late and incomplete works at Marvel, including SPIDER-MAN/BLACK CAT: THE EVIL MEN DO and DAREDEVIL: THE TARGET.
There’s really not much Smith can do right now to quiet the complaints on the latter issue; Marvel is likely uninterested in completing a 6 issue miniseries of which only 1 issue came out 6 years ago (in addition, it seems there’s been a falling out between with Smith and Marvel, with Smith reportedly miffed at EiC Joe Quesada for not supporting him more publicly in response to fan criticism). And the only way the complaints about lateness will be quieted is if Smith establishes a better track record in the long run, something he has promised to do with this series, having built in a 6 month gap between the first and second halves of this 12 issue series.
As for the writing and art, both Smith and Flanagan have stepped up their game here. Smith is well-known for reading online critiques of his work (and sometimes taking them too much to heart), and he’s admitted to reading them while working on CACOPHONY. In a sign of growth and maturity as a creator, rather than getting angry about the criticism, he’s using it to improve, specifically citing his efforts to tone down some of the vulgarity, as well as overly-verbose dialogue. There’s still some PG-13 stuff here, particularly laying on Poison Ivy’s sexuality pretty thick, but still, the adjustments Smith has made are readily apparent.
With CACOPHONY, there were also criticisms that Flanagan’s art was too cartoony, but Flanagan too has grown as an artist. Smith has said they are trying to evoke the classic Steve Englehart/Marshall Rogers run on Batman, and that influence is very apparent in Flanagan’s art. Like Rogers, Flanagan manages to portray Batman as a human being, with all the range of emotion that implies. There are also several standout panels that are just really fun to look at, including a flashback scene of a young Robin (Dick Grayson) wearing a yarmulke and holding a torah scroll, and a grisly scene of one of Poison Ivy’s victims. And hey, if you’re going to do T&A, you might as well do it right; Flanagan’s Ivy is very sexy, along with amusingly placed foliage to cover up the naughty bits. To be honest, Flanagan’s art is so nice here, that I’d rather he did the covers than Bill Sienkiewicz.
As for the story, there’s a bit of a “greatest hits” feel to it, with most of the major Bat villains making at least a cameo as part of a tour through Arkham Asylum, including The Joker, The Riddler, Two-Face, Killer Croc, and the Mad Hatter. But this is to be expected anytime a major writer comes on for a stint; they want to play with the big guns. The Demon also makes an appearance, apparently because Flanagan wanted to draw him, and Smith does a much more clever and creative job with his rhymes than most writers.
This story takes place well before FINAL CRISIS, so Batman is still Bruce Wayne, although there are a number of moments in the issue that seem to foreshadow Bruce’s fate, including a scene where he muses on the ways he expects to die in the line of duty, and who would take over for him. Also seemingly tying in with the fallout from BATTLE FOR THE COWL is the major theme that permeates the issue, with Batman reflecting on the various Robins moving on to new identities, and having second thoughts about having kids as partners (given that Smith wrote the first six scripts before this issue came out, it’s possible that it’s just happy coincidence, but if not, DC and Smith should be commended on their coordination).
This is not a new issue for Batman (or for Captain America, for that matter), but what’s different here is that Batman concludes that his next partner should be an adult, already trained. This really just raises more questions; it’s been retroactively justified that Batman has had Robin as a partner as a way of connecting with his own lost childhood, but if we remove that aspect, why would the notoriously independent Batman even want a partner? That question isn’t really addressed, but in accordance with this line of thought, and as promised in interviews, Smith introduces a mysterious new vigilante who assists Batman at the end of the issue. He is not named yet, but going by the look of his mask, I’m going to say “The Gazelle” or “The Aardvark.” Smith has also said that this character will be spun off into his own solo series after THE WIDENING GYRE concludes, which seems like a tall order; there will have to be a lot of work done to make the character compelling enough to support his own series, after being featured in just one limited series. But hey, he’s got 11 more issues; let’s see what happens.
In most places, Matt Adler goes by the name his mother gave him, but occasionally uses the handle "CylverSaber", based on a character he created for the old DARK FORCES II: JEDI KNIGHT game (one hint of his overweening nerddom). He currently does IT and networking support for the government of Nassau County, NY, but his dream is to write for a living, and is in the process of figuring out how to get publishers to give his stuff a look. In the meantime, he passes the time by writing for AICN, CBR, and a few other places. He has also written for MARVEL SPOTLIGHT magazine.

DAN DARE: THE VOYAGE TO VENUS I & II

Created by: Frank Hampson Published by: Titan Books Reviewed by: Baytor

Not terribly long ago, I got a mild rebuke in the Talk Back for saying I wasn’t a terribly big fan of the Golden Age (which was considered a bit strange for a comic reviewer to say). I’m actually a big fan of certain Golden Age books, but we comic fans know what we like and we tend to stick to it, and I’m as guilty of it as anyone else. Even when I got into British comics a few years back, it was because those 2000AD collections featured stories written by some of my favorite creators, and I made little effort to move past their stable of characters. So the notion that I “got into British comics” is a misnomer, as I only got into 2000AD. So in an effort to break out of my provincial tastes, I’ve embarked on a scheme to try out some of the better respected work of the Golden and Silver Age, and one of my first stops is DAN DARE, PILOT OF THE FUTURE.
Some stuff ages really well, other stuff not so much. Dan Dare’s debut adventure falls into the latter category and the modern reader will have to take into account the time & place it was written. This is very much the product of post-War Britain, before the grim reality ground the English Dream of continuing their Empire under its heel; and while attitudes toward women and other cultures are improving, they still cling to a somewhat condescending, patriarchal attitude. To its advantage, the strip gleefully embraces the clichés of the day with a certain humorous flair that never seems self-conscious. This was, after all, a time when a rotund character (whose hobbies includes “sleeping”) will find himself inexplicably in his boxer shorts for obvious comic relief without the belief that this detracted from the drama of the main plot.
This is actually the second time I’ve experienced this story, having listened to a fairly dull, edited radio play of it. In a nutshell, Earth is rapidly approaching the end of its viability thanks to a growing food shortage and has hung its hopes on cultivating food on what they believe is an uninhabited Venus. But ship after ship blows up in the final stages of their voyage and Dan Dare & his trusty crew brave the risks, do the impossible, land on Venus, and find themselves at the start of the first interplanetary war thanks to the evil Mekon, Dan’s arch-enemy. Thankfully, it plays out much better in its original form, especially with the heaping doses of comedy doled out by Spaceman Digby and his boxer shorts. The various artists (all working to a similar style) often add a whimsical element to the art, such as the body language of Dare & Digby when they steal uniforms from a Venusian museum.
The story is told in a series of two-page strips, which often makes for a wonky dramatic structure as each installment needs to quickly reach a dramatic or comedic moment; so it’s not unusual for some bit of drama to be conveniently forgotten later on, such as a wig that Dan Dare uses to communicate with some savage blue-skinned Venusians, which he loses as an inconvenient time to set up a cliff-hanger…but which is totally forgotten several installments later when other Earthlings are freely communicating with the same people with no explanation. The same also occurs with the Venusian atmosphere, which is at first deadly to humans (except inside where it’s adjusted for their biology), but is forgotten the moment its necessary for the plot to have humans walking around without masks in the story’s finale.
Some of this might be due to the influence of Arthur C. Clarke, the noted science fiction author, who acted as a consultant for this tale. So perhaps it was Clarke who pointed out that the atmosphere on Venus wouldn’t be breathable by humans and that a savage people on Venus wouldn’t speak any known Earth language…only to have Frank Hampson cheerfully toss this out the moment it became inconvenient. In any event, fidelity to what has been established is not a major concern, which I find adds to the charm of the book.
Ultimately, the Classic DAN DARE strips get a qualified endorsement from me. There’s lots of fun to be had if you enjoy old-fashioned science fiction, with lots of humor and action, but not much in the way of realism. Well, at least not how we would define it today, but like a lot of science fiction of its era, it loves showing little diagrams that show how the various bits of tech work, such as the revolving floors that shift position depending on whether it’s Earth gravity or artificial gravity being used. It’s also one of the best looking books of its era. But be forewarned that you have to adjust your sensibilities to that of the 1950s and not judge it by modern standards.

TINY TITANS #19

By Art Baltazar & Franco Publisher: DC Comics Reviewer: Ambush Bug

If you don't like TINY TITANS then your heart is cold and dead and probably smells and likely has a few cat-hairs stuck to it and I don't like you.
What's not to like about this book?
It functions in its own continuity, but pays close attention as to what's going on in DC proper.
All of the adult super-heroes are depicted in true Charlie Brown-manner (you only see them from the waist down).
The art is cute and appealing and I always marvel at the way Art makes even the most lame looking Titan character cool looking with their distinctive style.
The book offers new and fresh takes on characters that I could give two shits about in DC proper (Bumblebee is the shit in this book, in the regular DCU, who gives a frag?).
The latter portion of the book is filled with activities such as word finds, puzzles, mazes, and games.
The book acknowledges every member of the Teen Titans past, present, and future, so if you're bored with one character, all you have to do is turn the page and WHA-BLAMM! New character!
And finally, and most importantly, it remembers a time when funny books were just that and it brings the funny in every page.
Sure occasionally a joke or two ranks high on the corny meter, but I have nothing but love to give this book.
Issue #19 is one of my favorites since this book began. Art & Franco talked about this issue at WizardWorld Chicago this year, touting this issue as the most girly issue of TINY TITANS ever. It's all about love, this one is. The first tale is a silent rainy day date between two unlikely characters; Bumblebee and Plasmus. Seeing them ride a bicycle built for two, enjoy ice cream, and bound around in a room full of super balls is enough to make even the coldest heart melt.
Story two shows Robin's women woes as he tries to get a report on flowers finished, but keeps on being interrupted by all of the hotties of the Teen Titans thinking that the flower Robin keeps drawing is for them.
Bumblebee and Plasmus are back for a second date to the movies in the third story, best part of that one being the visit to the concession stand.
Finally, the monkeys of the TINY TITANS universe chat about recruiting new members to their Titans Apes Club. It's got monkeys. Nuff blah blah-ed.
The rest of the book is filled with one-page stories like the two Wonder Girls getting their golden lassos tangled and a few Titans showing the reader how to properly eat a lollipop. Last week, someone commented in the talkbacks that reviewing comics for kids is pointless here at AICN Comics. Damn, that just made me sad. I hope I never, ever think that way. Reading comics like TINY TITANS appeals to that inner child in me that can't help but laugh when Croc gets a lollipop stuck to his face or stifle an "aww" when Bumblebee and Plasmus share a jellybean. I can enjoy heady Vertigo style comics like FABLES and SANDMAN. I can dig on mighty super-powered melees like WAR OF KINGS and BLACKEST NIGHT. But I never want to be so jaded that I can't remember to have fun while reading comics. TINY TITANS is good comics, boiling down the essence of what makes these characters appealing with simple art and stories that seem to ooze from that part of you that should never grow up. Art Baltazar and Franco have that in spades and thankfully are secure enough to express it in this amazing comic. Enjoy your THE BOYS or WALKING DEAD or whatever uber-violent/ultra-sophisticated comic du jour, but also remind yourself that it's also ok to like a book geared towards kids. Having won the Eisner this year, I hope this book will gain more readers and be around for a long, long time because for an industry that grew up from appealing to kids, we sure have steered a long way from that. TINY TITANS is that beacon of light there to steer anyone who lost that inner child who used to read comics on their belly in the family room back to that simpler, more fun time.
Ambush Bug is Mark L. Miller, reviewer and co-editor of AICN Comics for over eight years. Check out his short comic book fiction from Cream City Comics’ MUSCLES & FIGHTS VOL.3 and MUSCLES & FRIGHTS VOL.1 on his ComicSpace page. Bug was interviewed here and here at Cream City Comics. Look for more comics from Bug in 2009 from Bluewater Comics, including the sequel to THE TINGLER for their VINCENT PRICE PRESENTS ongoing series in stores September 2009 and VINCENT PRICE PRESENTS WITCHFINDER GENERAL and ROGER CORMAN PRESENTS DEATHSPORT to be released in late 2009/early 2010.

WEST COAST BLUES OGN

Writer: Jean-Patrick Manchette Art: Jacques Tardi Publisher: Fantagraphics Books Reviewer: Mr. Pasty

Reading WEST COAST BLUES is a good way to find out what would have happened to Willy Loman had his evil side emerged – kind of like “Superman III” when the Man of Steel got a taste of synthetic kryptonite. George Gerfaut is a salesman by trade, but spends his nights driving around Paris hopped up on bourbon and barbiturates and looking for trouble. He finds it in some unusual places, but then again this is an unusual book, like one of those movies where everyone talks cool and leads a life ten times more interesting than yours.
One of the things that struck me right off the bat was how jarring the artwork was. The Pasty Peeps already know I loathe black and white comics, but the Gods have reached down and sharpened Tardi’s pencil, elevating a visceral literary style into a complex art form. Scenery is everything here. The characters resemble a cross between GASOLINE ALLEY and NANCY (post-1994) but their simplicity draws out the dynamic scenery and near-brilliant use of shading. As your typical phobic hetero, I could probably do without all the gratuitous dick-shots, but I understand they have a place in this story. Besides, there is no way I’m complimenting a cartoon cock just in case I ever decide to run for public office.
So Gerfaut finds himself in a bunch of self-induced predicaments. Watching him try to not just survive, but to also figure out a way to reverse the many precarious situations that befall him, is half the fun. The narrative comes full circle but is written without form. Like Gerfaut’s life, it often drifts from one mood to the next and never finds itself boxed in by its own limitations. Of course every whimsical scenario is relentless is its preposterousness, but again, the characters exist unlike the usual posturing heroes that populate some mainstream books. Not only do they behave as if there is no reader, they behave like there is no world except for what’s currently in front of them. Gerfaut is nearly killed by thugs at the beach. After he fights them off and returns to his family – a mere 30 feet away – he goes about his business like it never happened. I, on the other hand, spent the next three pages waiting for the other shoe to drop. Suspense, surprise, payoff – its all here – and realized by characters I was made to care about. Simply put, WEST COAST BLUES delivers.
Final word: If you read WEST COAST BLUES one time, you’ll enjoy it. If you read it twice, you’ll understand it. Three times and you’ll experience it. If the weekly rack is getting stale, part with some green and check this one out. You won’t soon forget it.
Web heads who can’t get enough of Mr. Pasty’s word vomit are encouraged to watch him operate as Nostradumbass over at here. MMAmania.com. Love, hate and Mafia Wars requests should be directed here.

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY #17

Writers: Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning Penciler: Brad Walker Published by: Disney… oops, I mean Marvel Reviewed by: BottleImp

Maybe it’s just that I’m getting old and cranky, but I remember the comics I read as a kid were a lot better than most of the crap being published today. Now I’ll freely admit that there’s a heavy layer of nostalgia obscuring the finer details of those long-ago purchases from the spinner rack, and I’m sure that the reality of the stories and artwork that I loved twenty years ago couldn’t possibly measure up to the illusion of perfection stored away in my imperfect memory. Nevertheless, there is one aspect of these older comics that does not pale upon re-reading: the sense of adventure.
I blame Moore, Miller, Gaiman, and all those other breakout creators of the 1980s. They were so passionate about expanding the horizons of comic books beyond the four-color kiddie adventure, so determined to legitimize the medium as literature rather than trash, so desperate to proclaim, “Comics aren’t just for kids!”…and they succeeded. But at what cost? The intellectualism and mature subject matter has devolved into the turgid and the pretentious. Hell, even in the realm of superhero fantasy, the once polarizing and innovative “deconstruction” of those spandex gods has been utilized so often, it’s become the status quo. Comic books are now all-grown up—but in growing up, they’ve lost that childlike sense of wonder and excitement (which is probably why I never see anyone under the age of twenty-five in the local comic shops). The joy of escapist fantasy has been extinguished.
Well, not totally.
Like a beacon in the darkness, Marvel’s “cosmic” titles helmed by Abnett and Lanning are bringing that almost forgotten sense of FUN back to the comic page. And this month’s GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY is no exception. Let’s see: great mix of characters? Check—alongside such archetypes as the sorcerer and the military man we have a talking tree, a talking raccoon AND a telepathic Russian dog (though not all in this issue, sadly). Danger and thrills on an epic scale? Check—a fissure in space that not only threatens to destroy the fabric of space/time, but also brings giant spaceship-ravaging tentacles. Humor to provide a little levity to the situation? Check—did I mention that GOTG features both a talking raccoon and a talking tree? And when Groot the talking tree teams up with the Inhumans’ Maximus the Mad, it’s a recipe for hi-larity! I smell a sitcom here…
Seriously, though, Abnett and Lanning have proven again that they know adventure. Just as NOVA channels that sense of wonder you once got from reading SPIDER-MAN, GOTG evokes that classic Marvel tradition of the Band of Misfits (either X-Men or Avengers—take your pick) who still manage to succeed despite their obviously flawed group dynamic.
And speaking of the classics, the end of this issue will be a real treat for all of you out there who are old enough to remember the cosmic stuff that Jim Starlin was doing for Marvel back in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s. Brad Walker renders a chilling cliffhanger that has me hanging on the edge of my seat—next month can’t come soon enough. Remember that feeling from when you were a kid? No? Then you’d better put down whatever dreary, pretentious crap you’ve been reading and check out some of the best stuff to grace whatever passes for the spinner rack these days.
When released from his Bottle, the Imp takes the form of Stephen Andrade, an artist/illustrator/pirate monkey painter from the Northeast. You can see some of his artwork athere. He’s given up comics more times than he can remember. But every time he thinks he's out, they pull him back in.

FVZA #1

Writer: David Hine Artist: Roy Allan Martinez Painters: Kinsun Loh & Jerry Choo Publisher: Radical Comics Reviewer: Matt Adler

This may be the first comic to be based on a website. I don’t mean based on a webcomic; FVZA.org is a site that purports to tell the “real” history of the world, as it has been overtaken by people infected with vampire and zombie viruses. It treats the subject completely seriously, and advises visitors on how to deal with the threat. Radical and writer David Hine have drawn upon the history created by the website’s author, Richard Dargan, to tell a story set in the present day as the world faces the resurgence of zombies and vampires.
The artwork, by Roy Allan Martinez (SON OF M) is very much in line with Radical’s usual fare; this means, on the one hand that it is beautifully painted and ultra-realistic, coming across as movie stills (not unintentionally). On the other hand, this approach tends to homogenize the artist, removing a lot of the stylistic quirks we’ve seen in Martinez’s other work that made it interesting.
The central characters in this story are Dr. Hugh Pecos and his two grandchildren, now adults, whom he has raised since their parents were apparently killed by vampires. Pecos is the world’s foremost authority on the undead, and has dedicated his life to stamping them out. He’s been mostly successful till now, but is convinced that the undead are about to make their return, and has trained his grandkids in the martial arts in order to fight the threat he foresees. Pecos is very much an obsessive, coming across as a mix of Van Helsing and Captain Ahab. He’s so focused on the threat that he mostly ignores the feelings of the children he’s raising in favor of making sure they’re prepared.
Now grown, the two kids have developed very differently. Landra, the granddaughter, has embraced her grandfather’s cause and is very much the ass-kicker. Her brother Vidal is far more reluctant and skeptical, and has a strained relationship with their grandfather. Hine develops these characterizations very well, making the dynamic between Pecos and his grandchildren seem authentic. Although we don’t have vampires and zombies to deal with, most of us have encountered someone who is so focused on their work that they neglect their personal relationships, and Hine manages to portray that accurately in Pecos.
Another task Hine is faced with is weaving vampire and zombie history into real life events, since that is a central element of what the website does. For the most part it’s done very well and entertainingly, with sequences set in the Old West, for example. But one scene, which had victims of a Nazi concentration camp infected with the zombie virus, I was not entirely comfortable with. I understand that due to the nature of this project, there isn’t much choice but to address an important historical event such as the Holocaust in these terms, but I’m just not comfortable seeing a real life historical tragedy mixed with fantasy like that.
The zombies here are pretty standard; mostly mindless, shambling corpses, though we’re told they have some awareness of their condition, which increases their torment. The vampires retain their full intelligence, and some have banded together in a secret cabal to preserve their species under threat of extermination by humans. There are other, more ambitious vampires, who have greater goals than mere survival, and are willing to use the zombies (and the virus that creates them) for their own ends. These two factions of vampires come into conflict, but caught in the middle are two newly-turned vamps who have not yet fully lost their humanity, and are scared shitless about what they’ve fallen into. These characters are important, because they provide the point of view for the reader being introduced to this world for the first time.
This is only a 3 issue miniseries, but the set-up here is pretty compelling, and I could easily see this warranting an ongoing, or at least a series of miniseries. Hine’s crafted an engaging tale, and while I do wish Radical would allow for more variation in their art styles, Martinez tells the story effectively. A promising start.

BATMAN & ROBIN #3

Writer: Grant Morrison Artist: Frank Quitely Publisher: DC Comics Reviewer: Optimous Douche

Here Pyggy, Pyggy…Optimous wants to give your gloriously psychotic ass a big hug. For anyone that chooses to ignore the best comic on the spinner racks, my opening summons is offering some much deserved love to one of the most interesting Batman foils in recent memory. Morrison has crafted Pyg to be so fucking insane, it makes the Joker look a caricature of craziness, a mere circus clown by comparison.
One of the overarching current “bat-complaints” (in quotes because it is insipid, stupid and overly fan-boyish) is that Dick Grayson is not Batman. For the first three pages of this issue, I could swear my left hand to God that Bruce Wayne had stopped fucking monkeys in the Paleolithic era, or whatever the hell he was supposed to be doing at the end of FINAL CRISIS, slipped back into the cowl and told Dick to go back and bang some alien broads in Titans Tower. Yes folks, Dick Grayson has finally manned up as he tears through the streets of Gotham on the Bat-cycle dragging alongside him one of Pyg’s foot soldiers. Once he has Pyg’s location the real fun starts. Fear not though, true believers, Dick does throw in some of his traditional trademark funny once the danger subsides.
Since the title is BATMAN & ROBIN, let’s not forget about Dick’s pint sized albatross with attitude. Let’s be honest, up until this point Damian has merely been the embodiment of douchiness wrapped in red and green. Morrison must have known that fan sympathy was waning by presenting this kid as “all attitude, all the time,” because for the first time the attitude is presented at the right time and place as he tries to escape from Pyg and balanced with some moments of genuine surprise and dare I say love after Dick rescues him.
Pyg ultimately gets his just desserts, but not until after his psychosis shines off the page. I’ll be the first to admit that Morrison loses me from a comprehension standpoint when he allows his characters to spout off in tangential tirades about fetish bologna and the waxing and waning of the moons of albacore, but like I said earlier, if the character is crazy to begin with, spouting crazy talk only seems natural. Also, when the crazy is balanced with Quitely masterfully rendering a knife dancing ballet set to “sexy, hot, disco” the moment transcends to delightful lunacy. I know the moment called for some authentic disco, but for some reason my internal soundtrack kept playing the modern disco styling of Scissor Sister’s “I Don’t Feel Like Dancing.” Once Pyg is done tormenting a captive Damian, the little lad uses his assassin upbringing to do some serious damage.
Batman uses his sleuthing to find out that Pyg is trying to infect Gotham with a virus that makes people addicted to other drugs, and also unveils that Pyg is far from the mastermind of this whole operation as exhibited by the “reveal” on the last page of…SPOILER…The Red Hood. Again though, while a good mystery, it’s the unique beats and moments of this book that left me absolutely enthralled.
It will be very interesting to see where issue 4 of this series is going to land. With Quitely taking a hiatus I have grave concerns. New artist Phillip Tan is accomplished, but as we have learned with much of Morrison’s work it takes a unique individual to convey his special brand of crazy. Will Tan be able to pictorially convey madness for the masses? I guess we’ll find out next month.
When Optimous Douche isn’t reading comics and misspelling the names of 80’s icons, he “transforms” into a corporate communications guru. "What if the whole world had superpowers? Find out in the pages of Optimous’ original book AVERAGE JOE. Read the first full issue on Optimous’ New Blog and see original sketches by fellow @$$hole Bottleimp. If you are a publisher or can help these guys get AVERAGE JOE up, up, and on the shelves in any way, drop Optimous a line."

X-MEN: MISFITS V1

Story by Raina Telgemeier and Dave Roman Art by Anzu Released by Del Ray Reviewer: Scott Green

X-MEN: MISFITS is the second collaboration between Del Rey and Marvel to recast the mutant super heroes using manga genre tropes: Wolverine as a wild young outcast in the NARUTO tradition, Kitty Pryde as a schoolgirl surrounded by handsome, interested boys, along the lines of OURAN HIGH SCHOOL HOST CLUB. While some manga can transcend the boundaries of their intended demographics, both of the Del Rey/Marvel manga projects have been works for specific audiences. While capable of appealing to their target reader profiles, they have lacked the hook to convince someone disinterested in premise.
My impression of the first, WOLVERINE: PRODIGAL SON, was that it was best suited to an audience who knew of the X-Men from the movies or cartoon, and knew of shonen manga from bits of its anime adaptations. Read too much WOLVERINE and the parent X-MEN comics or read too much manga, and paging through PRODIGAL SON would be apt to become an exercise in comparing the work to the traditions that inspired it.
Capturing the spirit of popular shoujo (intended for young to teenage girls) manga without blindly aping the model, and leveraging that aesthetic to produce memorable reinterpretations of X-Men's distinctive personalities, MISFITS does not require that caveat. Characters and themes remain recognizable, and as such, MISFITS is not an exercise of scrubbing away everything but the brand. However, its reimagining of the population and mechanics of an X-MEN story are sufficiently distinct from the aims of a super-hero story that MISFITS doesn't lend itself to be measured too stringently against the original comic. At the same time, it evokes the feel of Japanese shoujo manga capably enough that readers of the genre will not have cause to reject it.
The flaw in this grafting of shoujo and X-MEN is that it aims to accomplish too much in too little space. Written for a graphic novel rather than a weekly anthology like most manga or a monthly issue like most super-hero comics, character introductions and plot developments are densely packed into 160 pages. Bouncing from one significant moment to the next, there's little space to stop and appreciate the characters or their situation. The potential humor and chemistry of the situations don't have enough time to fully develop, which is a burdensome liability when it comes to persuading a tentative reader, not enamored with the idea of a teen social drama version of the X-Men.
The character of Kitty Pryde was introduced into the X-MEN comic by writer Chris Claremont and artist John Byrne in the lead up to their geek-canon ready “Dark Phoenix Saga.” She was a suburban, Jewish teenager who found that she had the mutant ability to phase through solid objects, whereupon the heroic X-Men and their antagonists in the Hellfire Club attempted to recruit her. She came to serve as the rookie and soul of the team, referencing her Jewish heritage and the Holocaust as the ultimate expression of intolerance to deliver the climactic statements in the confrontation with anti-mutant bigot Reverend William Stryker in original graphic novel GOD LOVES, MAN KILLS (loose inspiration for the second X-Men movie) and Magneto.
MISFITS introduces 15 year old Kitty Pryde as the middle child in a trio of sisters who help their parents run a Chicago restaurant. After spending her school day feeling like an outcast, she stops at the restaurant, where her sisters (in the maid/waitress ensemble of numerous manga) send Kitty home, where her parents are meeting with Mr. Lehnsherr (aka Magneto). The stranger explains that he owes a lot to her grandfather, and to repay the debt he'll offer Kitty a scholarship to a private school in Westchester, New York. It turns out that Kitty's mutant ability had been less than a secret, marked by some embarrassing incidents of falling through walls and floors. With that in mind, she quickly gives glum consent to the offer. Fearing that she might fall through a plane, she buckles on a bicycle helmet and knee/elbow pads for the bus ride to New York. She finds a gorgeous campus where she is greeted by half a dozen identical young men looking to carry her bags. The multiple guy, Jamie Madrox, proves to be one of the many male students who express interest in Kitty, especially given that she's the only female student on campus.
MISFITS is keenly aware of the symbolism of the characters, which starts with a title page wallpapered by icons of the characters' powers. Yet the expression of these symbols isn't always the same as it is in traditional X-MEN comics. And while MISFITS offers a number of easter eggs for comic readers (Kitty Pryde mentions that she'd like to call herself the briefly used in the comic code-name "Ariel"), few X-Men characters retain their traditional roles. Professor Xavier is still the headmaster of his school for gifted youngsters. Long time X-Man Storm, appearing in her leather and Mohawk look that debuted in the mid 80's, and Beast, amusingly appearing like a plush badger with a tie around his neck, appear as instructors, but they are joined by traditional arch-villain Magneto. A number of characters who appeared in the comic as antagonists associated with the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants, including Pyro, Blob and Quicksilver, join the cast as students. At the same time, employing their power or character concept metaphorically, the personalities and roles of many of the other X-Men are recast in service of MISFITS. The clear, sometimes boisterous Iceman becomes cold. Angel descends to the student body as the aloof captain of the Hellfire Club, a group of students who act on Magneto's philosophy of mutant supremacy by spending more time celebrating their power rather than focusing on the education offered by Xavier.
As the only girl on the scene, Kitty Pryde has an open invitation to any social circle in the school. The premise accomplishes more than reproduce the genre notion of a "reverse harem" in which a girl is followed around by a group of guys interested in her affection (the above mentioned OURAN HIGH, WALLFLOWER, FUSHIGI YUUGI). There are too many characters and not enough time for the focus to become a matter of the search for the right guy. Instead, it becomes the story of a young woman with complete social agency. A protagonist with this degree of control is atypical for this sort of high school shoujo, but the complicated path navigated by Kitty as she looks for the correct people with which to associate is certainly fitting for the genre. While MISFITS edges towards its super hero origins when dealing with the consequences, it does remain in keeping with the emotional rules set up by the story.
MISFITS is effective in visually representing itself as shoujo. It thoroughly leverages the graphical vocabulary of the genre, in its use of speed lines short, puffy super deformed shifts in character design for the lighter moments, and symbolic background objects, such as birds or leaves. While it is expressive enough, the art doesn't close in on character faces to the degree that some shoujo does. Instead, it works from context and the full look of the characters. What the characters are wearing often plays a significant role in expressing their role or personality.
MISFITS ably accomplishes the aim of reworking the X-Men themes of fitting in and prejudice into a high school relationship maelstrom, populated by a sympathetic, if sometimes bland, lead and a host of attractive guys. It then churns until it hits a boil in its climax. Characters are being introduced and situations shifted constantly. If Kitty is contending for control, it's not against any social force, so much as it is to make her decisions before MISFITS runs out of space. Ideas such as the middle-child relationship with her sisters come and go so quickly that it is uncertain as to whether they were intended as foundations to build upon at a later time, or quick bits of character shading. Introductions, inefficiencies and gags are all whipped up in the blend, such that they become unidentifiable.
Scott Green has been writing for AICN ANIME for over eight years. If you like what you see here and love anime & manga, be sure to check out his latest AICN ANIME column every week on AICN.

It’s Bug again. This time, I’m bringing a helping of webcomics for you to check out. As pricey as comics get these days, you gotta admit, FRIKKIN’ FREE is a pretty nice price tag. These comics are just a click away, so check them out when you’ve got some spare time. Fellow @$$Hole Matt Adler gave me an assist this week with a few webcomics. I’m back at the end with one I got to check out. Enjoy.

JUST A MAN #1 By Brian John Mitchell and Andrew White

This isn’t really what I would consider a comic, web or otherwise. Yes, it has sequential art but each panel is on its own page; it seems to me part of the art of comics is arranging panel layout for a proper visual and reading flow. The art is…very basic. A step up from stick figures. I’m not sure I can say much else about it. The writing is pretty basic as well, as each page (or rather, panel) has a first person narration caption that tells you exactly what’s going on. This isn’t really for me, although perhaps someone else will get more out of it. – Matt Adler

LOST KISSES #9 & 10 By Brian John Mitchell

This comic, however, is literally stick figures. I’m not sure if it’s supposed to be autobiographical. The author seems to be musing somewhat morbidly on his life, his career as an artist (???) and interactions with other people. It’s pretty self-absorbed, but worse, it’s completely uninteresting. The lettering consists of crudely done hand-lettering for word balloons and what appears to be the Times New Roman font for the captions (come on, couldn’t we at least get a more interesting font? It’s not like it would have taken any more effort to point and click). Bottom line, I can’t fathom anyone who would be interested to read this. – Matt Adler

XO #5 By Brian John Mitchell and Melissa Spence Gardner

This comic comes the closest to actual cartooning, although it still uses the “one panel per page” format. This series is about a hired killer, again, narrating his adventures in the first person. Once again, the writing is pretty perfunctory, and has no real voice to it. But at least the story has a little more to it. Overall, reading these comics was a chore, and not something I’d ever want to do again. If writing them makes the author happy, more power to him, but I don’t see this as a career for him unless he manages to improve by leaps and bounds. – Matt Adler

BEAR QUEST By Zach Taylor

BEAR QUEST is as creative as it is fun. At the top of every entry, you get the adventures of a one eyed blue bear who gets into adventures with hunters, crocogators, hippos, carnivals, and mysterious shadow creatures. At the bottom of the page, you get the same thing, except the action is depicted in the pixellated style of the old Atari Game System. Both are fun to read and it's even more fun to compare the sequential action to the pixellated version of the story below. One of my favorite parts of the story was a page where the bear gets into a stare down with a hunter. There's a panel with the hunter, then one with the bear, just staring at each other. How is this dramatic pause translated below in the video game version? Why the game has been paused, that's how. Clever things like this make this a cut above other web attempts. I also love it that when the bear dies, the story isn't over, he just wakes up in his cave and the game starts all over again. The way creator Zach Taylor understands both the comics and video game media is exceptional. This is a silent story aside from captions like BEAR POW+D at the bottom of the page, which makes for a quick read. And it's something you can flip through at lunch at work and definitely worth clicking on. – Ambush Bug

FLASH: REBIRTH #4 DC Comics

As good as GREEN LANTERN is, I have to say, Geoff Johns' FLASH pales in comparison. It's not necessarily a bad miniseries, but whereas Johns is telling compelling GL stories, here he is telling a necessary one. Basically, Johns is laying the groundwork for next year's big FLASH relaunch--establishing the mythos, asking new questions, offering new theories about the Speed Force and those who harness it. But in order for GL to be as good as it is now, we had to trudge through a bit of tedium. Unfortunately, FLASH: REBIRTH is that tedium. With very slow plot pacing, a plethora of characters, and a whole lot of discourse, reading FLASH is not a quick read--a no no for a FLASH book. But some of the ideas like ***SPOILER*** the revelation that Barry didn't harness the Speed Force that fateful night with the lab coat and the lightning and the chemicals and the 'splosion--he actually invented it-- ***END SPOILER*** are kind of cool, if you ask me. And given Johns’ track record (pun intended) with FLASH, I tend to think he’ll trudge through all of this necessary establishing stuff and come out with a winner. Although I think there are too many Flashes in the kitchen these days, this miniseries did succeed in making Barry Allen interesting again. – Bug

HULK #14/ INCREDIBLE HULK #601 Marvel Comics

Marvel needs to space out its HULK books, dontchathink? Not only did these two books come out last week, but SON OF HULK did too (I don't even want to go into that unnecessary title--OK, I will--why is there a SON OF HULK title still when the Son of Hulk is in INCREDIBLE HULK being looked after by a depowered Banner? I mean, the sword and sorcery stuff is OK and it's Paul Jenkins writing so that is cool, but the only reason I was reading the title was to see the SULK (Son of Hulk) head back to Earth for some Daddy Revenge and now that that's happening, let's put the final nail in this one, can we? BUT I DIGRESS...!) The new status quo of the Hulk is kind of cool. Rulk is causing chaos in HULK while, as I said before, depowered Banner and Sulk are in INCREDIBLE. HULK first: this was actually the first issue of HULK that I actually felt Loeb tried to write cohesively instead of just tossing story ideas together. Domino sees a depowered Rulk duck into an alley and change into the Big Red One. Rulk wants to kill her for that. Sure, it's stupid that Rulk has to gather another cadre of red clad warriors (Thundra, Elektra, Crimson Dynamo...damn they're stretching it with that one), but we actually get into Rulk's head and get a bit of explanation as to why Hulk is dumb then smart then crafty. Thanks, Loeb, for actually trying this issue. As for INCREDIBLE, Greg Pak--who with Fred Van Lente has been half the awesomeness behind INCREDIBLE HERCULES--does a great job of setting up some cool scenes as Banner returns to New York for the first time after World War Hulk. Of course, he's met by basically the entire super powered community. Pak does a great job of writing Bruce and I look forward to reading more of this book. With Loeb actually trying and Pak delivering the goods, the Hulk is in better shape than ever before. And that makes this Hulk fan happy. - Bug

BLACKEST NIGHT: TITANS #1 DC Comics

Although I ditched the TITANS and TEEN TITANS books a while back, the completist part of me AKA the enemy of my bank account made me pick this one up and it turned out to be a pretty damn good read. Although the premise is becoming pretty worn thin (buncha heroes are honoring the dead and then, BLAZAMMO, all of a sudden heroes are met with zombified versions of either their own legacy or folks they've lost), this one hits home because the Titans have lost a shitload of teammates. It's weird focusing on Hawk and Dove, but for the first time in...ever, I actually felt invested in the pair of characters. Some nice characterization by writer J.T.Krul and capable art by Ed Benes make this a worthwhile read. - Bug

NOVA #28 Marvel Comics

A good ending is hard to do. Coming up with a way to dot all of the I's and cross all of the T's isn't as easy as it seems. Oftentimes things are either left unresolved or done ham-fistedly or sloppily in order for a story to come to a close. It isn't often, but when a comic like NOVA #28 comes along which wraps things up so perfectly, there's a need to celebrate it. Not only do Abnett & Lanning wrap up the recent Nova Corps storyline, but they toss in a nice capper to the WAR OF KINGS event as well, and do so in a way that is utterly satisfying and, dare I say it, optimistic (naughty word these days in comics, I know!) But even without this phenomenal finale, I would have been praising this book for the dripping cool exchange between Blastaar and Nova that needs to be read to be really appreciated. The best part of this book is the promise of more adventure to come with the final panels. Now that the new status quo has been set, I'm looking forward to more cosmic powered cool for NOVA from Abnett & Lanning. 28 issues in and they
Readers Talkback
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  • Sept. 2, 2009, 4:46 a.m. CST

    My hand is bleeding.....

    by cheyne_stoking_DMS

    from punching my screen after seeing spider-mouse.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 4:52 a.m. CST

    Manga X-Men.....

    by cheyne_stoking_DMS

    can suck my left nut and kiss the right.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 4:54 a.m. CST

    Stay Dead Bruce Wayne

    by Ddub222

    When the whole "R.I.P." thing began I complained bitterly and said to anyone who'd listen that Bruce better not really be dead. But after the last few months of the Bat-books, I hope he is dead for a good long (really long) time. I am thoroughly enjoying all the Batman books and seeing the "family" grow into their new roles. One more sentence I never thought I'd write: I am even enjoying Judd Winick's book.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 4:58 a.m. CST

    Would suck if Wayne returns as Bats...

    by BurnHollywood

    Dick Grayson has had a giant character arc spanning decades in several different costumes, culminating in Batman's booties. To wreck this character's natural evolution into this powerful role just to make some whiners whimpering about Brucey being gone would be tragic. Stay dead, Wayne...you had a good run.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:07 a.m. CST

    When can we expect 3-D comic books?!?!?

    by Trannyformers_Apologist

    It's not a gimmick is it?!?!?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:51 a.m. CST

    Red Hulk is Banner's assistant from Incredible Hulk #1

    by Uncle Stan

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:58 a.m. CST

    FLAH: REBIRHT may be a "necessary story"...

    by RenoNevada2000

    ... but so was "GREEN LANTERN: Rebirth" and look what that ultimately lead to. Does Johns have something similar and grand up his sleeve for the Speedsters over the next few years?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 6:01 a.m. CST

    The aduts were depicted from the waist down in Peanuts

    by NotVeryFunny

    Not from the waist up

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 6:02 a.m. CST

    Errr... That's REBIRTH

    by RenoNevada2000

    Fingers are dyslexic this morning.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 6:15 a.m. CST

    Unbenownst to everyone...

    by maelstrom_ZERO

    <p>...the "Speed Force" was actually the power source created by a bunch of near-immortal aliens that spanned countless dimensions in order to instill peace and order throughout the multiverse, with each multiverse a "sector" given unto a few speedsters to police.</p> <p>And yes, I'm joking. But it'd be horrifically amusing if I were right. With emphasis on the "horrific."</p>

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 6:38 a.m. CST

    Bruce Wayne / Steve Rogers

    by V'Shael

    The thing that "killed" them, actually sent their consciousness back into the past? <p> Is this what it has come down to now? The most obvious hack plagiarism?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 6:43 a.m. CST

    Ambush Bug's Cheap Shot Reviews...

    by catlettuce4

    ...are basically unintelligible. Do you write this shit at 5am after a night on Ridilin?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 7:13 a.m. CST

    Disney Shakes Up Marvel

    by Buzz Maverik

    Marvelketeer Roll Call: Joe! Axel! Brian! Mark! Joe Michael! Jeph!<p>"Garsh, fellas, it sure is swell of you all to come in. Now, get those desks cleaned out, huh-yuck,huh-yuck, huh-yuck! We can't have you boys just making comics for the kids out there, who ain't really kids but are mostly grown men well over 20 years old, yuk-yuk-yuk, and would buy your funny books even if you sold 'em with blank pages. So, bye bye shock tactics! Bye-bye stretched out stories where nothing happens except a ton o' talkin' with nobody sayin' nuthin'! Bye bye convincin' yerselves that yer not doing superhero comic books and convincin' yer readers that superhero comics ain't what they want -- you know, the guys that would buy an insurance prospectus if it came with a Marvel logo. Bye bye not knowing where your story is going! Bye bye bloated cross overs that recycle stale ideas from the competition. Hyuck-hyuck-hyuck."

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 7:32 a.m. CST

    Ohhhhh.....

    by Dr.Zeus

    ...Who's the leader of the club that's made for you and me? M-A-R...V-E-L.....M-O-U-S-E! We're so F@cked! (no we're not!) We're so F@cked! (no we're not!) If you don't believe me wait and see! See! See! See! Ohhhhhh come along and sing our song that wuz wrote for you and me. M-A-R...V-E-L.....M-O-U-S-E! :D heh (Annette was a hotty)

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 7:50 a.m. CST

    Could we please get Mohammed vs Werewolves next?

    by classyfredblassy

    Oh that's right, people would riot and get killed. Never mind.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 7:57 a.m. CST

    Give Hickman time to settle on FF -- So Says DOOM!

    by V. von Doom

    It's a good start and I'm sure he has lots of ideas. Maybe one of them will remove the sour memory of Mark Millar's punkd DOOM from my brain, but I really doubt it.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 7:59 a.m. CST

    And is THE MIGHTY spooky/creepy or what?

    by V. von Doom

    The hair stands on my neck whenever I read an issue of that sucker. Scarier than zombies any day of the week.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 8:16 a.m. CST

    chris samnee is the man

    by ironic_name

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 8:17 a.m. CST

    I like Grayson too...

    by Sailor Rip

    ...but what, a few good books and all the sudden everyone's all fuck Bruce Wayne? <p> So much for the loyalty of comic book fans.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 8:18 a.m. CST

    Adults WERE NEVER depicted in Peanuts!

    by PessimusGrime

    Sometimes the characters were seen talking to adults, but the adults were always off-panel and never provided with word balloons, they were unheard and unseen. Always. In the animated cartoons, they were also unseen, but their voices were heard as that infamous "Wah-wah wah wah WAHH" sound effect. Geez people, you're supposed to be geeks for crying out loud... get your facts straight.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 8:21 a.m. CST

    V'Shael

    by hst666

    Where did you hear the past thing about Cap? Does this tie in with my 1602 theory? (And when I say my, I don't mean to say that others were not thinking the same thing. It was just one of the first things I thought of when I was trying to think of how they would bring him back.)<p><p>Also, it may have nothing to do with 1602, but it would be neat if it did.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 8:22 a.m. CST

    V. von doom!

    by steverodgers

    Doom. Did you read the last issue of Millar's run? Doom kicks ass. Doom has no master. He also did great stuff with Ben and Reed. The last panel is great. Two old friends having a beer. Which is good for you since, they will be easier for you to destroy them.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 8:35 a.m. CST

    Quitely is leaving Batman and Robin?

    by OBESE_WAN_KENOBI

    Oh, no. This was becoming my favorite book, and had pinnacle written all over it. But when an artist leaves in the middle of the story... That disappoints me greatly.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 8:46 a.m. CST

    Quitely is leaving Batman and Robin

    by Series7

    Good fucking get his ass on the Mighty and give that book tolerable art to go with the good story.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 8:47 a.m. CST

    Has anyone read/reviewed Darwyn Cooke's

    by dogrobber

    adaptation of one of the Donald Westlake/Richard Stark 'Parker' books (I think it is 'The Hunter')?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 8:51 a.m. CST

    Hickman's Fantastic Four

    by Joenathan

    I completely agree. Great book, I'm really excited for the next one. I'm becoming more and more of a fan of Hickman. Between Pax Romana, Secret Warriors and now FF... He's good stuff, man.<br><br>Speaking of great Fantastic Four... You know what else is good that didn't get a review this week? Dark Wolverine. It is really well done. I'm hooked. And I totally expected zero from Daken, but, man, I was wrong. Great book.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:11 a.m. CST

    Quitely

    by Joenathan

    I don't think he's leaving. I think he's back the next arc.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:12 a.m. CST

    The Ending of Doom's Master was stupid.

    by cookylamoo

    Doom follows around this all powerful being (who really isn't all that all powerful) for ages so he can learn what? All-powerfulness? The guy was a mutant...end of lesson. And meanwhile Mr. All powerful can't figure out the guy following him, who looks just like Doctor Doom is actually Doctor Doom? Suspender my disbelief. Plus, none of the Reed Richards in the current arc have ever heard of All powerful although he supposedly slaughtered Fantastic Fours in a Thousand Dimensions.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:13 a.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by Series7

    You read Hickmans Nightly News? Its fucking awesome. Pick it up, its why he's such a big name now.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:15 a.m. CST

    Batman and Robin

    by Series7

    I know everyone LOVES to believe that a 10 year old can beat up people. Which to a point could be true given the right training. But put him up against anyone that can fight and he would get his ass whooped. They need to do that in B&R, someone needs to drop his ass. He's a fucking 10 year old, there just wouldn't be enough power there to actually beat anyone that knew what they were doing.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:15 a.m. CST

    Quitely -- Straight from Didio's Mouth

    by optimous_douche

    He can't complete a book on a monthly schedule, so Tan will pinch hit.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:16 a.m. CST

    hst666

    by Joenathan

    He's refering to Rebirth, which has Cap tumbling through time because the Skull shot him with a ray gun that makes him... ah... tumble through time or something and the skull wanted to take over Steve's mind... or something...<br><br>What's the 1602 theory? I hope it has something to do with explaining how it was touted as having regular continuity consquences, but then didn't.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:17 a.m. CST

    Hilter pissed about Disney buying Marvel

    by effector12

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lkt5BB8JbwA&feature=response_watch

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:20 a.m. CST

    Reed Richards/Seres 7

    by Joenathan

    I forgot to mention that I don't like the new bulky Reed or his short sleeve outfit. Just in case anyone was wondering about my opinion concerning it...<br><br>Good question about Wyncham (?) and the multiple Reeds. Although Hickman has already mentioned Millar's run, so maybe the Infinity Gauntlet Reeds are a reaction to Clyde's Multi-verse slaughter?<br><br>Nightly News is on my list. I was looking at the trade last week, but put it off until I catch up on other stuff.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:21 a.m. CST

    Series 7 vs. 10 year olds

    by Joenathan

    What if that 10 year old hit you in the face with a power drill?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:27 a.m. CST

    I don't think a 10 year old

    by Series7

    Would be tall enough to hit me in the face.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:43 a.m. CST

    @hst: Steve Rogers, back in time.

    by V'Shael

    In a recent issue, Sharon revealed that the gun she used to shoot Steve was designed by none other than Victor Von Doom. And it's purpose is to freeze an individual in space and time. <p> Then it's revealed that Steve is back in WWII with a pre-Winter-soldier Bucky, ready to fight WW2 battles all over again. <p> They should have just let him die, and left him dead. Because I don't think Captain America today would recognise or approve of his country starting wars on falsified evidence, and torturing people. (Yeah, I know, political bullshit and all, but still...) <p> I just think it makes more sense for the 21st century Captain America to be a cold-war soldier, who carries a gun, and has a more pragmatic approach to things, instead of Steves raw idealism. <p> Bucky doesn't have to go all Frank Punisher and that, but he could hold Steves idealism in high regard and honor it, while accepting that in today's world, he's incapable of living up to it.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:46 a.m. CST

    B&R #3 felt a lot like Final Crisis

    by palinode

    Seriously. Grant Morrisson is working out some strange obsessions here: a crazy guy making slaves out of the populace, an aerosol virus messing with people's minds, and a whole lot of exposition both glorious and incomprehensible. I expected Superman to show up with a trans-dimensional machine that did... something... or other. WHAT THE HELL WAS GOING ON IN FINAL CRISIS?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:46 a.m. CST

    Series 7

    by Joenathan

    What if he had a light-weight stepladder that he was very adept at moving about on in a quick, acrobatic manner?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:47 a.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by Series7

    No.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:48 a.m. CST

    V'shael

    by Joenathan

    You left out the part where Sharon wrecked the Skull's machine, thus UN-sticking Cap in time. So, you know... now it makes sense.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:51 a.m. CST

    Series 7

    by Joenathan

    I don't think you're taking this discussion seriously...<br<br>Now: What if a spritely and spiteful 10 year old, dressed in a colorful outfit and assisted by an easily maneuverable step ladder, the acrobatic applications of which he was very familiar with, were to suddenly attack you and hit you in the face with a power drill? What would you do then?<br><br>Because you know what, I think the only thing you'd do is hit the floor.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:59 a.m. CST

    No matter how spiritual you are, ya have to admit...

    by Apple Octopus

    ... somebody's gonna burn for that "Loaded Bible" series!!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:09 a.m. CST

    steverodgers, DOOM ALWAYS kicks ass!

    by V. von Doom

    But that story still sticks in my craw -- Marquis of Death, whoopie. As I argued before, Lazy Writing 101: Create instant ultra-powered enemy no one has heard of before (and no one will hear of again) to beat down THE most dangerous villain in the Marvel U, just to let him pop up again with no effort and slaughter the dork. If you can get ahold of it, find the old-old story in which the Red Skull takes over Latveria and really knocks Victor Von for a loop before he triumphs -- THAT is the way to build up respect, and for both villains.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:09 a.m. CST

    I think your taking it

    by Series7

    Too seriously.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:10 a.m. CST

    DOOM ALWAYS kicks ass!

    by Series7

    That Master of Evil short series was pretty good.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:17 a.m. CST

    V'Shael, good point about Wayne/Rogers

    by V. von Doom

    Hard to believe it's a coincidence that two mainstays of the two companies are suffering (kind of) the same fate. (I say "kind of" because so far we've only seen Bruce Wayne busy being the Bat-Skull in Darkest Night.) BUT: Given the lead times necessary for comics I'm 100% sure Brubaker planned his time travel idea from the beginning. BUT: Could he have picked it up, perhaps subconsciously, from conversations with Morrison, who probably thought of the thing separately for Final Crisis? Much food for thought here ...

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:20 a.m. CST

    Series7, DOOM is waiting for the Masters of Evil trade ...

    by V. von Doom

    ... probably as a present for Kid Doom for Xmas. Thus haven't read it yet and haven't flipped thru it on the racks.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:31 a.m. CST

    Series 7

    by Joenathan

    All I'm saying is: a 10 year old with a power drill and a step ladder, the acrobatic use of which he is very familiar with, could take you. I don't think that is a very outlandish statement.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:32 a.m. CST

    V. von Doom: DOOM ALWAYS kicks ass!

    by steverodgers

    I would say you are correct (Doom is always correct) that is pretty simple story telling. However done well, with good art, and nice character stuff, in this case how Ben deals with his wedding, it can be a pretty fun comic booking. I will look for Red Skull taking of Latveria story (is that in FF?), as that sounds kick ass, and I always love it when the Red Skull gets his hat handed to him.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:33 a.m. CST

    Anyone reading X-Men Forever?

    by White Goodman

    I kind of like it.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:34 a.m. CST

    Doom!/Lazy writing

    by Joenathan

    In Clyde's defense, he was set up in Kick-ass and 1984 as super powerful. I think there was even an Old Man Logan mention. It was all Millar-universe stuff, so if you didn't read any of them, you wouldn't know, especially a busy man such as yourself, as I'm sure you were busy trying to rule the world and all, but it was there.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:35 a.m. CST

    Fuck Kevin Smith

    by White Goodman

    Seriously, fuck that guy. If he is pissed that people were angry because he can't finish a serious then he is a little bitch. If you promise to do something, fucking do it.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:35 a.m. CST

    V. von Doom

    by Series7

    The trade is out man. Came out like a month ago.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:40 a.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by Series7

    All I'm saying is that, anyone who can fight would be smart enough/fast enough to get out of the way. Yes if I just stood there like a piece of shit he would hit me and it would probably hurt, or would he drill my face (hehehe)? I take it he does that in the newest B&R (haven't read it yet). But make Robin try to fight someone of merit, throw away characters and hentchmen no one gives a shit about, sure let them get their asses kicked by a 10 year old. But someon who could fight, no. Sure maybe the kid will get in a couple of punches here and there, but not enough to do anything. <P> I mean, he's ten he doesn't have the strength/developed muscle to do much. Anyone whos fast enough could get a grip on him and beat the snot out of him. You could literally just grab him by the legs and fling him around into shit. Or Mike Vick his ass to the concrete floor.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:44 a.m. CST

    Okay, but what if...

    by Joenathan

    He did some Jackie Chan type shit with that step ladder and and distracted you and you were like "Wow, that was aw..." And then he hit you with the power drill! I bet that would hurt like a son of a bitch.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:48 a.m. CST

    Morrison and Brubaker

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    are both just ripping off LOST and therefore are both hacks. I love how the reviewers here have turned into Morrison apologists now. I'm also thinking that the right ten year old could probably kick most of your asses.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:50 a.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by hst666

    I haven't read Reborn yet, although I plan to. Myb theory, and it's realy more of an idea, was that he would end up in 1602, as the Cap charcter in that series came from the "present." This would be how that universe tied into the main Marvel line. The similarity of characters still needs to be explained somehow and exactly what would ultimately happen still needs to be explained. I haven't read 1602 in awhile, but didn't Cap refer to some conflict in the present times that was going on, which could have been Civil War.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:50 a.m. CST

    Kevin Smith

    by MattAdler

    "If he is pissed that people were angry because he can't finish a serious then he is a little bitch. " <p> <p> <p> I think he's just a bit oversensitive, which isn't that uncommon in creative types. I do think it's unfair to blame Joe Quesada for not standing up for him; when Joe was getting questions every week "Where's Spider-Man/Black Cat?" eventually he was going to have to say "Ask Kevin."

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:50 a.m. CST

    Lost

    by Joenathan

    isn't the first thing to ever do a "tumbling through time" story.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:54 a.m. CST

    1602

    by Joenathan

    That sounds familiar, but I quickly soured on that series for some reason and haven't revisited it ever. There were some cool ideas, but it seemed to drift and then fall apart. I liked the use of Daredevil in that thing... but wasn't Cap basically a white Indian or something?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:56 a.m. CST

    1602

    by steverodgers

    Cap also had some pretty manly pig-tails.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:56 a.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by Series7

    Yes would can play this game all day. But no. Its bull shit to think that he is just going to kick so much ass. He needs to have his ass beat, its unbelievable that he would win in every fight. <P> Also I don't understand why all fanboys are SO want to see him win? Like no one even seems to question it. Its like a fact to Batman fans that 10 year old Robin will just kick all sorts of ass. I would understand more if he were a silent sort of assassin type fighter. But he's a loud, in your face style of fighting. Put that up agahinst anyone who can actually fight and he'll lose. <P> So what stupid trick will you have to make up for your boy wonder next??

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:57 a.m. CST

    Rulk

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    The reason that Rulk had to gather a bunch of heroes to get Domino is because it was already established in the issue that he couldn't kill her by himself due to her luck powers, and Thunderbolt Ross orders him to assemble a team, thinking that numbers will take her down.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:58 a.m. CST

    So is The Time Travelers wife

    by Series7

    Just a Cap movie in disguise?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:59 a.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Morrison-lover!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:01 a.m. CST

    Series 7

    by Joenathan

    Don't be mad at me just because an acrobatic 10 year old armed with a power drill and a step ladder could beat you up! I don't make the rules, man, I just live by them.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:05 a.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by Series7

    Ok fine. You win your silly little what if game. I'm not mad, I just don't get way everyone believes that its totally possible for a 10 year old. I know you love to play devils advocate to EVERYTHING. So whatever.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:05 a.m. CST

    why not way*

    by Series7

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:06 a.m. CST

    we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    by Joenathan

    Not loving the Morrison automatically means that you're a Leifeld/Winnick/Loeb fan, youu know... just fyi...

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:07 a.m. CST

    Series 7

    by Joenathan

    WOOOOOOOOOO! WOOOOOOOOO! I WIN! I WIN! You all saw it! I WIN!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:07 a.m. CST

    by Joenathan

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:08 a.m. CST

    Series 7

    by Joenathan

    Also, I don't play Devil's Advocate to EVERYTHING...

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:09 a.m. CST

    Meant to mention this last week

    by Mr.FTW

    Does anyone find if interesting that DC is doing certain things in the name of diversity namely keeping Barbara in the chair and giving us the Batwoman but now all of DC's "girls" are blue eyed blondes. Not that I have any problems with blue eyed blondes but with Supergirl, Powergirl, Wondergirl and now Batgirl DC is starting to look like Hef and the Girls Next Door. Good times.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:17 a.m. CST

    Mr. FTW

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Wonder Woman, Batwoman, Catwoman, Poison Ivy, Terra, The Question, et cetera.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:17 a.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by Series7

    Yes you do. You just present a case for the opposite side of something that someone is mad about. You aren't even arguing, you just saying something. So sure you won, but you didn't win anything. You don't present statements about your personal choice weather you agree or disagree with anything. When someone hates on something, you just go well what about this...what about that....what about this differently. So I'm basically left to infer that you too would get your ass kicked by a 10 year old boy because you seem to think that he can do anything.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:19 a.m. CST

    What about the time

    by Joenathan

    above where I agreed with the Fantastic Four review? That wasn't contrary.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:19 a.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    How many issues of Spawn did you buy again? Was it 80-something? Morrison's a hack writer. I thought we were in agreement about that. You couldn't even finish the abominable Final Crisis. This from a guy who read 80 issues of Spawn!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:20 a.m. CST

    Series7

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Get over it, man. You would both get beat up by a 10 year old GIRL. There, now I win!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:23 a.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Not to mention that I am a Loeb fan. Hulk rules, you drool.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:24 a.m. CST

    It was 82, thank you very much...

    by Joenathan

    Like I said before, the 90s were a confusing time, man. Besides, I'm not a Morisson apologist, I mean sure, he's written some questionable stuff, like FC, sure, but he's still great.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:26 a.m. CST

    Wrong.

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    He's a pretentious asshole that doesn't respect fan criticism.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:26 a.m. CST

    I really don't see

    by Joenathan

    the corellation between my drooling and Hulk's supposed ruling, so whatever.<br><br>P.S. Ah... Ultimatum...?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:28 a.m. CST

    True,

    by Joenathan

    but for every FC, there's a We3. Or an All-Star Superman. Or an Invisibles. Come on, man! Drink the Kool-aid already!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:29 a.m. CST

    I haven't read Ultimatum.

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    But if we use your own defense for that hack Morrison, then I could say, "sure, he's written some questionable stuff... but he's still great." Couldn't I?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:29 a.m. CST

    Come on we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    by Series7

    You hate Morrison, you should be on my side with this.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:30 a.m. CST

    Loeb

    by Joenathan

    Name his good stuff. <br><Br>And don't say Long Halloween, because apeing and outright plagurizing other great works don't count.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:30 a.m. CST

    For every Ultimatum

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    there's a Batman: Long Halloween or a Spider-Man: Blue.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:31 a.m. CST

    Also

    by Joenathan

    You shouldn't read Ultimatum. Really. You shouldn't.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:32 a.m. CST

    I didn't read Spider-man: Bue,

    by Joenathan

    But I'll counter with Ultimates Volume 3

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:32 a.m. CST

    Ultimatum

    by Series7

    Was just like a big summer block buster movie. It was stupid and silly and everything was in slow mo.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:33 a.m. CST

    ment to add

    by Series7

    But when your reading it, your kind of enjoying it for how over the top it all is. But afterward your like, that was pretty fucking stupid.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:34 a.m. CST

    Series7

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    I'm on my own side. I think that it's great that you hate a shit-stain, undecypherable, pompous ass like Morrison though. He should never be allowed to write comics again. Jeph Loeb on the other hand is great.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:35 a.m. CST

    What was wrong with Ultimates 3?

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    I liked it.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:35 a.m. CST

    Ultimatum

    by Joenathan

    See, I'd go with Authority when talking about about big, dumb fun. With Ultimatum, all I thought was: This is dumb and poorly written. It was like the Prequels, even down to its insane inability to remember its own pre-established continuity

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:36 a.m. CST

    What was wrong with Ultimates 3?!?!?!

    by Joenathan

    ...Let's just agree to disagree...

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:36 a.m. CST

    Whose becoming a Morrison apologist

    by optimous_douche

    I like Batman & Robin sure...but even months after the fact I still get in a Final Crisis dig.<p> We were never Morrison haters -- how could you be? he has done some amazing work and broken several boundaries.<p> We (or at least I) simply despised Final Crisis or allow me to be clearer, I hated that his story was called Crisis and so hyped.<p> Different time, different title and if the marketing folks at DC had one fucking clue how to sell FC I might have felt differently.<p> Shit, if Liefield had a good book tomorrow, trust me I would forget the past (or at least only mention it as side line snark).<p> Morrison apologist, time to find the subtext in the reviews scooter, not just randomly find words.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:38 a.m. CST

    agree to disagree

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    OK

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:41 a.m. CST

    I WIN AGAIN!

    by Joenathan

    Face, we_pray, Face!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:42 a.m. CST

    Whose you calling scooter?

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    I didn't see much subtext in the review. Just a lot of plot summary and "oh Morrison is so great even though he ruined Batman and DC comics forever."

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:44 a.m. CST

    whatevs Joenathan

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    You're obviously a Morrison-loving tard whose only trying to look cool by bagging on Final Crisis. Go read your Spawn back issues and I'll read my Superman/Batmans. From a time before Morrison fucked everything up.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:44 a.m. CST

    For you information...

    by Joenathan

    I SOLD my Spawn issues, sir!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:45 a.m. CST

    Thank God

    by Series7

    This new guy in the office just told me that Todd McFarlane created Blade. I was like I don't think so, he said NO HE DID. I was like Ok fine. Too bad you just can't yell asinine shit at people in real life. <P> I looked I don't see Todd McFarlane having anything to do with Blade. I'm thinking that he thinks just because the two are black that they are related (I wonder if he knows Todd is white). Did Todd have anything to do with Blade?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:46 a.m. CST

    If any of you Morrison apologists

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    could explain what the fuck happened in FC then maybe you would have something but you can't.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:47 a.m. CST

    You sold them

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    but the stink of shame will remain on you forever. Face!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:49 a.m. CST

    Also

    by Series7

    Whats wrong with old Spawn?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:50 a.m. CST

    Blade was way before Mcfarlane

    by Joenathan

    Marv Wolfman created Blade, I believe. Tell that guy: "face!" from me.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:50 a.m. CST

    I only bought the 3-D issue of FC

    by Series7

    Because everything is better in 3-D.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:51 a.m. CST

    He's Written More Than Final Crisis SCOOTER!!!!

    by optimous_douche

    Yes, Final Crisis was an abomonation.<p> And really did HE ruin Batman? Was it Morrison who had the power to make Dick Grayson Batman? Don't think so...<p> Hate Didio if that's your problem with the big M!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:51 a.m. CST

    I don't think anyone is defending FC

    by Joenathan

    Also, I didn't finish it, but I believe it was all about how Batman WOULD use a gun.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:53 a.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by Series7

    I don't know. He is just a ten year old boy who carries a power drill in his back pocket and straps a step ladder to his back like a back pack. He kind of frightens me.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:54 a.m. CST

    Series 7/Spawn

    by Joenathan

    Old Spawn was pointless and during the haze of the 90s, it took me 82 issues to figure that out. I admit it freely, I don't feel any shame because of it, we all have skeletons, every single one of us around at the time gleefully bought every single Image Number 1 issue, every single one of us bought multiple variants of Gen 13 #1, none of us are perfect, not even Grant Morrison (see how I brought this post around and made it topically relevant?)

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:54 a.m. CST

    I will fight for FC's honor.

    by Series7

    Even though I never read it. I think the whole thing was just amazing. Like Watchman good.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:55 a.m. CST

    Series 7

    by Joenathan

    watch out, man, those fuckers are mean. Read Batman and Robin #3, if you don't believe me.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:57 a.m. CST

    Yeah Didio sucks

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    I never read anything by Morrison that was any good. It's all uncomprehensible pretentious garbage. But I'm sure that you like that kind of crap. Your half right though that FC was an abomination. Yes I hate Didio too and Quesada. That's why I like aintitcool, because I usually agree with the reviews. But not since you all became Morrison-loving apologists.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:57 a.m. CST

    I read this on Comicbook DB about Todd

    by Series7

    Today, McFarlane, his wife, Wanda, and their three children reside in Arizona, where Todd maintains a happily hectic balance between his family and all his interests (sports, film, comics, action figures). <P> How come when I tell people that’s how I live my life, they roll their eyes at me? Well minus the sports, I mean come on, no one on here has ever lifted a finger with the notion of doing any physical in their life. Well and the wife and kids aspect also, we all know we all live in our mothers basement, not even our brothers or sisters will lets us babysit their kids.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:58 a.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by Series7

    I do know one way to easily stop a 10 year old. Offer then candy and a ride in my van with no windows. I always win that way.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:58 a.m. CST

    them not then*

    by Series7

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:59 a.m. CST

    Fareal

    by Series7

    Superman doesn't eat salads why should we?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:59 a.m. CST

    If people stopped giving Kevin Smith $$$

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    he's slim down. Boycott Kevin Smith for the sake of his health.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, noon CST

    Well I still like Spawn

    by Series7

    I've thought about trying to collect them all. Too bad I didn't have your number Joenathan before you sold them all.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:01 p.m. CST

    Series 7

    by Joenathan

    Yeah, but what if he was doing Jackie Chan shit in your van and had an airhorn?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:03 p.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by Series7

    You missed the candy aspect...see I already won there.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:04 p.m. CST

    Don't mention Jackie Chan

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    and that hack Morrison in the same breath! It's OK to mention airhorns I guess.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:08 p.m. CST

    Dear Series 7......

    by Psynapse

    You obviously don't have any serious martial artists in your family (By serious I mean a 1st degree black belt at age 10, full on amateur MMA at 17 who's so good he's been offered 3 different MMA training camps this last summer)<p> When he was 10 I saw one of my cousin Dominic's matches. He threw his much older, heavier, and accomplished instructor around like a damn rag doll.<p>It may be unusual and hard to get your head around but a sufficiently trained 10 year old WILL seriously fuck up people 5 times his size.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:09 p.m. CST

    Series 7

    by Joenathan

    Yeah, but then you have a sugar-high 10 year old doing Jackie Chan shit in your windowless van and going crazy on an airhorn. Sorry, I'm putting my money on Robin.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:09 p.m. CST

    Morrison apologist!

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Psynapse loves Morrison!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:11 p.m. CST

    Yes I see that

    by Series7

    Yeah I don't do martial arts, read my above post. <P> But put that 10 year old black belt kid, up against someone older who had that same black belt when he was a kid as well.....thats what I'm trying to say.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:12 p.m. CST

    Series 7

    by Joenathan

    are they still in a windowless van?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:12 p.m. CST

    10 year olds have a lower center of gravity

    by optimous_douche

    That's why as someone who is 6'6" I never pick fights with children or midgets unless they are in wheelchairs.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:12 p.m. CST

    Series7

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Will fight for Final Crisis and Spawn so that says it all.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:13 p.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by Series7

    Again MISSSING THE POINT WITH THE CANDY. Lets just say its not full of sugar.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:14 p.m. CST

    Series 7

    by Joenathan

    gross

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:14 p.m. CST

    optimous_douche

    by Series7

    BUT AH! What if its an older midget!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:15 p.m. CST

    Joenathan

    by Series7

    TA-DA! He gets it everyone!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:17 p.m. CST

    Optimus

    by Joenathan

    What if its a pair of Acrobatic Midgets?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:18 p.m. CST

    Dark Wolverine/Fantastic Four

    by Joenathan

    Just to restate: Good. <br><br>So is Secret Warriors

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:27 p.m. CST

    Wow talkback is hopping: Morrison is a douche

    by gooseud

    Ok, so last week I got the TPB of the 1st 4 issues of Irredeemable. We will get back to that in a second. Morrison wrote the introduction. Guess what it was about? Yep, you guessed it: a 2 page diatribe on how the internet and critics suck and are too dumb to understand a high level work (the unspoken title it was obvious he was talking about was Final Crisis). I'm being dead serious, the entire intro is devoted to that topic. So as far as I'm concerned, Morrison can take his unintelligible pretentious FC crap and shove it up his thin skinned ass. In fact, I'm going to criticize him even MORE on the net now just for the specific reason that he claims he doesnt read it but we all know he lives and dies over every last word.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:33 p.m. CST

    Morrison is the greatest comics writer since Alan Moore

    by BlueBallsinMyBloodEye

    He's been doing this shit since the mid-80s-- and doing it GREAT. Nobody's still insulting Bendis over Secret Invasion, and he's been at this less than half as long as Morrison. SEAGUY FOREVER

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:33 p.m. CST

    Irredeemable

    by gooseud

    Ok, so this will come back around to the topic: I recently saw The Hurt Locker. Good movie. Great acting. Renner was great as the main character, John Wayne re-incarnated. Suspense. Sense of reality. All that good stuff. And yet, while I walked out of the theater with great respect for the movie and its accomplishment, I was unmoved. Why? Because for all its technical greatness, there was never a single moment you didnt know what would happen next and feel like you had seen it all before. All the Iraq War beats were there: Its hot and dirty. You cant tell who the enemy is. ITs mentally draining. They wont come out and fight. Etc etc. Which brings me to Irredeemable. Good book. I intend to keep buying it. But..........havent we seen this a million times before? Hasnt this all been covered? Anything by Millar? Superboy-Prime? Touches of Iron Man in Civil War? ITs a good book, but goddamn, can you give us ONE THING that was a bit unexpected? For that matter, why is it ALWAYS Superman or his analog who turns bad? Why not Batman? Show me a comic where it is Batman who goes apeshit evil and Supes has to stop him from killing.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:35 p.m. CST

    Thats because Bendis doesnt care.

    by gooseud

    Morrison on the other hand appears to live and die with every word of criticism, and insults anyone who would dare impugne his genius, this creating a beast that will keep feeding.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:36 p.m. CST

    Well at least Morrison admits there is the internet

    by Series7

    Does Alan Moore know there is the internet?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:36 p.m. CST

    DMZ

    by gooseud

    is it good? I have the first 25 issues or so and want to know if I should read it, but dont wanna bother if it sucks. Wood is usually pretty good, but I know literally nothing about it whatsoever.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:38 p.m. CST

    Where did Flash go off the rails?

    by gooseud

    Remember 4 years or so when Flash was the end-all be-all? The talkback was all Flash all the time? Rogues gallery and all that? the A$$holes reading the issues with their pants around their ankles? I am curious for an informed opinion: where did it all go wrong? I dont get the impression anyone gives a rats ass about Flash anymore, was there a "poor quality tipping point"? Or a slow gradual fade into suckdom? Or is it actually still awesome and I'm way off?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:42 p.m. CST

    Oh, come on, Morrison didn't "insult everyone"

    by Laserhead

    He got his feelings hurt and he lashed out A LITTLE. Really. You don't see him doing it again and again and again. Take it easy. The man's given you some of the greatest comic runs ever written. He's human, and sometimes humans get their feelings hurt. I don't see him conducting Newsarama interview after interview talking shit about his critics.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:43 p.m. CST

    Bendis should care

    by Laserhead

    Because he's completely blind to his own EXTREME shortcomings.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:44 p.m. CST

    Morrison apologist?? Not hardly

    by Psynapse

    Once upon a time (a la Invisibles) sure. Now after FC (which I COMPLETELY understood while reading but I realized the way the story was structured made it impossible to actually empathize with any of the characters so you really couldn't give a shit WHAT happened to them in the story) and his oh-so petulant 'When geeks have power you get Nazis' comment he lives and dies by his chosen sword (The pen) on each and every book from here on out. <p> FC's narrative is structured so that cognitive dissonance the reader experiences reflects the same thing the characters in the story (IE-Time and therefore causality as we humans know it is broken) are. Too bad he forgot that unless the audience can somehow relate on an emotional level they may as well be reading a documentary for all of the impact it will have for them.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:44 p.m. CST

    Well done Laserhead

    by BlueBallsinMyBloodEye

    You bunch of goddamned jerks.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:44 p.m. CST

    Fuck Alan Moore too

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    More pretentious crap that nobody actually understands and only a handful of people pretend to. Alan Moore is just as obnoxious as Morrison about not caring what we think. How dare they talk shit on us! What we think should be their main concern when they're writing comics. We're their bread and butter. Fuck both of them.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:46 p.m. CST

    Goose

    by Joenathan

    DMZ is alright, albeit simplistic and kind of hipstery. The mani message is: War is mean. It can be good, but mostly its alright. After awhile I was too bored to go on.<br><br>My problem with Irredeemable is that the characters aren't characters, they're just analogs and I don't care enough about them or the world they inhabited before what-his-face flips out to be moved. He could tear through pages of cheap Silver Age knock-offs, but so what? There's no attachment. Maybe if he had established them for a bit and then had him turn? Maybe, but as it is... meh. Not too mention, there's no effort involved. I get that that is kind of the point, that Superman unfetterred is really dangerous, but still... meh

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:47 p.m. CST

    Zenith, Animal Man, Doom Patrol, Arkham Asylum--

    by BlueBallsinMyBloodEye

    --The Invisibles, JLA, The Filth, We3, New X-Men, All-Star Superman<p>I mean, that's a pretty fucking good batting average. Millar and Ellis have made careers basically riffing on Morrison's style and tropes.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:47 p.m. CST

    Psynapse

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Your an apologist and your reasons are smarty pants bullshit.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:48 p.m. CST

    Ah, yes, people only PRETEND to understand great art

    by BlueBallsinMyBloodEye

    Top notch argument there. What's with that Shakespeare guy? People only PRETEND that's good writing. Give me Stephen King any day.<p>Why hasn't anybody banned this jackass?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:49 p.m. CST

    Blueballs

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Are those Morrison's balls in your eye? I think so.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:49 p.m. CST

    pray for mad:

    by BlueBallsinMyBloodEye

    You're an illiterate and your reasons are dumb-ass bullshit.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:50 p.m. CST

    stuff

    by Homer Sexual

    I find it hard to believe that Dark Wolverine is good, but I have such a problem with the character I will never find out. Also, I despise the FF, so won't ever know about that either. <p> But I thought Final Crisis was fine. Over-hyped, yes, and confusing, but an entertaining enough read. <p> I was disappointed in Hulk 600, so 14 was a pleasant surprise, back to the over-the-top, chock full o'characters fun that I love. The Red Rulk Brigade is just awesome, I must say. Also loved his Ultimate Hulk Annual. So Loeb writes some ok stuff. And...my tattoo guy LOVED Ultimatum. Really, and he is 41. <p> Now, Joe, before you call my tat guy a moron, let me inform you that he let me read the first 9 trades of Walking Dead, as well as the first 24 issues of Invincible. So he's also a big Kirkman fan. I find Kirkman to be an entertaining, but unoriginal, writer. Irreedemable...well, only read two issues, but they sucked. <p> New Mutants is also a lot of fun, much like Guardians of the Galaxy. The latest issue concluded the Legion storyline, and it was the best story I've read featuring Legion (fwiw). Zeb Wells is very well suited to this book (although he ruined Heroes for Hire).

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:51 p.m. CST

    Nobody argue with the mad skillz tampon

    by Laserhead

    Really. Let him wither and die. Seems like every few months the same dude pops in with a different screen name.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:52 p.m. CST

    Psynapse FC

    by optimous_douche

    Damn that was a good take.<p> Nail on the head my man.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:54 p.m. CST

    Bendis Plays It Safe

    by optimous_douche

    Love or hate the guy, he takes very few chances with his books.<p> hence, why you never see the Internet really erupt over what he does.<p> Personally I enjoy reading lil Wheedon, but I also love snark and it takes a lot for me to grow tired of it.<p> Morrison takes chances, hence the hate (or love).

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:55 p.m. CST

    Peanuts adults

    by BizarroJerry

    There are actually a handful of rare times when an adult's voice was heard, or an adult's hand was shown. But that's very rare and usually happened in the earlier years of the comic. Just FYI.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:55 p.m. CST

    Morrison is just another in a long line

    by Joenathan

    of authors who haven't quite learned the futility of replying to the masses. Bendis has. Hopefully Morrison will.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 12:56 p.m. CST

    Bendis doesn't even have the imagination

    by Laserhead

    to conceive of story elements that wouldn't be playing it safe. It's like his entire writerly education consists of three TV shows: Homicide, The West Wing, and Sports Night.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1 p.m. CST

    Homer!

    by Joenathan

    You make me sad.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:01 p.m. CST

    Optimous....

    by Psynapse

    Why thank you kind sir. :)

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:02 p.m. CST

    Tat guy

    by Joenathan

    He's not a moron, I just think he has bad taste. I mean, really, Ultimatum? Come on.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:04 p.m. CST

    Laserhead

    by Joenathan

    You forgot Mamet. You may be surprised to learn that I am a Bendis fan, but I am, and even I keenly feel the over-devotion to that source material.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:05 p.m. CST

    You're all wrong.

    by milla jovovich

    Both Jeph Loeb and Grant Morrison are great. It's not an either/or proposition. That mad skillz guy is right about one thing though: the Batman & Robin #3 review is mostly plot summary. I noticed there was no Green Lantern #45 review and no mention of the crystallized lovers or what their identities might be. Here's a link that speculates as to the mysterious lovers' identities as well as having more in depth reviews of Hulk and Batman & Robin: http://tinyurl.com/mw83ga. It also addresses people who think that Barry Allen is boring.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:07 p.m. CST

    Milla!

    by Joenathan

    I loved you in Night Train to Katmandu!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:09 p.m. CST

    Erupting over Bendis

    by Joenathan

    What about the time he killed Hawkeye? That was hilarious

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:12 p.m. CST

    I think DMZ is worth reading.

    by SleazyG.

    It's not just hippie dippy "war is bad" stuff. It deals with how the regular everyday people in NYC are stuck dealing with the afteraffects, including where they get their food and water and how they survive when trapped between two occupying forces. Some interesting stuff I haven't seen before, and a lot of tension between the various factions. Check it out.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:13 p.m. CST

    Kirkman unoriginal? Really?

    by gooseud

    Wow, Kirkman is many things, but unoriginal is definately not the first thing that comes to mind.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:13 p.m. CST

    Batman turning evil

    by Joenathan

    That would be good. He could go the "the very existance of the Heroes creates Villians, so the Heroes are the root of the problem." Do that one, Waid! You could call it: Also Irredeemable or Irredeemable as well!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:14 p.m. CST

    I'm gonna try DMZ this week

    by gooseud

    I'll give it a shot, no one seems to really hate it, and some people seem to think its pretty good. Joe's critique of "Its a little slow" would usually be valid EXCEPT I'm reading em back to back, so no worries there. I'll check in next week on it.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:16 p.m. CST

    Waid's new book

    by gooseud

    "TOTALLY Can't be redeemed no matter WHAT you do!! This guy is a real PRICK!!!" Coming in December from BOOM Studios.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:16 p.m. CST

    Not Hippy

    by Joenathan

    Hipster, as in: Everyone has a messenger bag. To me, it seemed obvious that the bad guys were REALLY bad and the good guys were good to a fault. What? A corporation of oppurtunistic capitalists? No Way!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:18 p.m. CST

    Kirkman

    by Joenathan

    is definately not unoriginal. Overly expository, yes. Perhaps a tad mellow dramatic, sure. But unoriginal? No. And there is a difference between exploring established genres and tropes and being unoriginal.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:18 p.m. CST

    I just find Bendis boring

    by gooseud

    I cant get worked up about him either way, he just inspires a huge gaping black hole of apathy in my soul. In fact, I'm worried if I ever actually finish an issue he wrote (which literally I never have in my life), I might kill myself on the spot due to overwhelming apathy. So, I'm probably not going to read him. As an aside, the polar opposite of that situation is Nova, which makes my head explode with glee from the kickass awesomeness every time I open the front cover.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:20 p.m. CST

    Goose

    by Joenathan

    DMZ isn't really slow, it's more... repetitive, I'd say. after awhile, it just kind of petered out for me. One of those books that kept falling to the bottom of my stack until I eventually admitted that I no longer enjoyed it.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:20 p.m. CST

    Joe, you forgot

    by gooseud

    casually arrogant, impulsive/ballsy/too fearless for his own good to a fault in his plot twists, scattershot, infuriatingly wordy......and totally fuckin awesome.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:22 p.m. CST

    Bendis

    by Joenathan

    This last NEw Avengers was great. Mockingbird vs. The Wrecking Crew? Awesome. Also, what about Illuminati? That was great. Alias? Also great.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:27 p.m. CST

    Goose

    by Joenathan

    I didn't forget. Remember Kirkman's "manifesto" (rolls eyes)

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:29 p.m. CST

    The good guys in DMZ? I haven't even seen one yet.

    by SleazyG.

    I'm not sure who these "really really good" characters are, as so far there haven't been any, including the protagonist. I guess you might be able to argue the case for Zee, but she's the only one who's even close. The whole book is full of grey characters who live in grey areas.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:41 p.m. CST

    Milla

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    I'm right about more than one thing and The Flash is boring.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:41 p.m. CST

    Bendis and Kirkman

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    both rock.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:47 p.m. CST

    Good guys

    by Joenathan

    Matty was ignorant, bot bad and now he's made of pure good natured gold. Then there's Zee and every single non-connected character on the ground. Anyone with any kind of agenda at all is automatically bad.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:50 p.m. CST

    Secret Invasion

    by steverodgers

    I actually just read SI after finding all the issues in the dollar bin. Amazing covers, mildly enjoyable, mostly boring comic. Speaking of Bendis, has anyone else noticed that the amount of people saying, "the hell" has dropped and we are back to the old fashioned, "what the hell?" - or is that just my imagination? I really hope it isn’t, “the hell” – drives me crazy and I can’t really explain why.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:51 p.m. CST

    Why are these reviews a week late?

    by Angelus_420

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:51 p.m. CST

    Hickman will save us all

    by Series7

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:51 p.m. CST

    And its a total false gray

    by Joenathan

    There's no real gray. Matty has never taken food from the starving so that he won't starve. He's never killed/destroyed/exposed a good person for the sake of the masses. There's no real hard decisions at all, the bad is always obvious, it only ever comes down to whether or not Matty personally likes a person. Otherwise its: Corporatiosn/governements = bad. Vegetable growing crusty punks = good.<br><br>I should state that I don't hate it. I read way into the arc with the elections of Porko? Posso? Whatever, I read a lot of it. It just got boring, is all, IMO. I'll be interested in hearing Goose's take.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:53 p.m. CST

    Bendis

    by Joenathan

    Ultimate Spider-man. Good. Long time good.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:54 p.m. CST

    Why are these reviews a week late?

    by Angelus_420

    These comics came out last week. Seeing as comics come out every week should you review the current weeks issues instead of comics that most people have read already.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 1:56 p.m. CST

    Bendis

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    is the greatest writer in comics.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2 p.m. CST

    Art Thibert is the reason Walt's art looks good

    by holidill

    They got Art Thibert to ink Walt Flanagan on the Kevin Smith Batman Book. I think that is what helped make the art better then Cacophany

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2:16 p.m. CST

    Don't Bother Skillz

    by optimous_douche

    Milla was simply trying to divert traffic to his review site.<p> The site that's afraid of paragraph spaces and has yet to learn you NEVER use a serrif font on the Web.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2:19 p.m. CST

    Sigh

    by CountZero

    "Morrison loses me from a comprehension standpoint when he allows his characters to spout off in tangential tirades about fetish bologna and the waxing and waning of the moons of albacore." I hate lines like this in reviews of Morrison's work. You make up a bunch of gibberish nonsense because you assume that's all Morrison did too. How about reading some fucking books? And I don't mean that you need to go read specific books to understand this particular Batman comic, I mean that maybe if you read a few books in general from time to time you might be better equipped to deal with writing that isn't literal and shallow.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2:20 p.m. CST

    WOLVERINE ART APPRECIATION #1

    by Series7

    Son of a bitch I wish I had known that before I went out and bought some of those. Fucking expensive variants.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2:26 p.m. CST

    Daniel Way

    by Series7

    Hmmmm I didn't like his Wolverine Origins stuff. But he is nailing it with Deadpool. The pirate issues have had me LAUGHING out loud like a retard. Though I don't know how he'll do with serious stuff.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2:37 p.m. CST

    Gotta disagree, Joenathan.

    by SleazyG.

    It's not about "vegetable growing crusty punks = good". It's about a civilian population trapped between two or more opposing forces doing whatever they have to in order to surive. Sometimes it's growing veggies, but sometimes it's working the black market to your advantage and playing different sides against each other in shifty deals.<p> Also, Matty is no golden god. He's getting more and more sucked in with every arc, and becoming much more morally compromised. Some crazy stuff happens after that election, which is around when you bailed, and it's much darker, and Matty is stuck in some deep shit. Plus, Matty's kind of a dick when it comes to the ladies, which is certainly a character flaw. He may not have the power to do some of the things you mention, either good or bad, but that doesn't mean anything. It's still about his personal choices and how they become more compromised the longer he's stuck in the DMZ. He's not even a reporter any more--he's pretty much become a partisan at this point, but an uninformed one who's being used as a dupe to do some really awful stuff.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2:41 p.m. CST

    Sigh back at ya

    by gooseud

    I too thought WE3 was great. Morrison's X men run? Great? Final Crisis? Total "Moons of Albacore" unintelligible gibberish. Did you READ that last issue? The ones with Supes randomly putting people in ice cube trays in his fridge while expounding on the 7th flux capicitor of the planet Xenon 37, out beyond the moons of Rylos? I hate that fanboy mentality that because someone wrote something awesome 4 years ago, everything he ever has written, is writing now, or will write is awesome, as if a talent is some sports team your rooting for and need to make excuses for. WE3 was fantastic. FC sucked balls. Each exist in their own little individual box. I'm far from a hypocrite on this, as I'm the biggest Bru fanboy you'll ever meet and I have readily admitted, he obviously had no idea what to do once Bucky became Cap, and in hindsight, once Buck fully assumed the identity, the book instantly went from great to not just mediocre but fully terrible.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2:42 p.m. CST

    Series

    by gooseud

    Its not Daniel Way, bro. You laugh like that because you ARE a retard. I kid because I love.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2:44 p.m. CST

    I must admit, this book sounds intruiging

    by gooseud

    I'm finding myself more intruiged by DMZ with every comment you two make. It sounds, at the very least, like not your every day run of the mill corporate horseshit comic, so its got that going for it I guess. Brian Wood always seems pretty intruiging to me generally, so I'm not surprised.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2:46 p.m. CST

    SLeazy

    by Joenathan

    agreed, I over-stated it for the purpose of illustration. I lost interest after awhile. I felt like the idea was a lot more complex, or would be, than it was portrayed. I wanted all the stuff you said, I just didn't feel like he really delivered. Who knows, maybe I dropped out too soon, but I was there from the start.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2:47 p.m. CST

    Hickman

    by Laserhead

    All I've read is The Nightly News and thought it was AWFUL. Really, really awful. But it did have some nice info and statistics lodged into the ridiculous story and the stiff, amateurish drawings.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2:48 p.m. CST

    Wood: Local

    by steverodgers

    Goose you ever read that one? I think its his hipster masterpiece.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2:51 p.m. CST

    Local

    by Joenathan

    Totally. Same with the one he does about the Bike Messengers... koos koos express? They're all good, it's just he's got a VERY recognizable bag of tropes, you know?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2:51 p.m. CST

    Laserhead

    by Series7

    Yeah the art in Nightly News was annoying. Have you read A Red Mass For Mars though? He didn't do the art. I like it....when it comes out.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2:54 p.m. CST

    Alias is good, and even kind of original. Kirkman..not so much.

    by Homer Sexual

    Sorry to make you sad, but I have to stand by my opinion that Kirkman is not very original. Walking Dead is not original at all. In fact, I can pinpoint the exact references he uses at various points. It's still the bomb, but I don't think it is original in any way, just very well done. <p> Invincible is a little more original, but it's mostly a twist on Superman. A big twist, to be sure. Also very entertaining. But not really original. <p> I am no Bendis fan, nor a hater. I did hate Disassembled, but I do love Alias. I learned of it here when I said Bendis never did anything memorable. Alias is awesome and even kind of original.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2:55 p.m. CST

    I was more sad that...

    by Joenathan

    you won't read Dark Wolverine or Fantastic Four.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 2:59 p.m. CST

    Homer

    by Joenathan

    I think you're holding too much to a strict "Original" standard. I mean, basically all superhero stuff can be boiled down to a handful of ideas. So, by your standards, name a new original book.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 3:02 p.m. CST

    But Fantastic Four Suuuucks!

    by Homer Sexual

    I like the Daken character, I just can't deal with the fact that no one notices his claws are different. Also he is way taller. I can live with his sudden huge tattoo (although how someone with a healing factor can have a tattoo is a whole nother rant) but the changed claws bugs me soooo much! It's the geek in me. <p> But the FF blows! I hate all of them! I especially hate Reed and Ben, but I am no fan of Sue and Johnny. Soooo dorky. So annoying. Sure, they were fine in their time, but they haven't aged well and I guess I'm not interested in giving them another chance, and everything I read here in general makes me think I'm right. Oh, I don't even like Dr. Doom, so there you go. <p> I do like Galactus and the Silver Surfer.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 3:03 p.m. CST

    Is it just me

    by ChocolateJesus

    or do Mickey's ears look like @$$holes?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 3:07 p.m. CST

    Gooseud

    by CountZero

    Where did I defend Final Crisis? I'm not a guy saying that Morrison is infallible, I don't like everything he's written and I've only even read a couple of issues of Final Crisis. Way to jump to conclusions there guy.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 3:10 p.m. CST

    Well, I kind of just did.

    by Homer Sexual

    Alias is kind of original. Runaways is original. Morrison's X-Men was original. But you are right, it's hard to be original. <p> Let's take Walking Dead. It is super entertaining, but I can't see anything original about it, not even a new twist on the genre. It is the same traditional concept that's been done since Night of the Living Dead. The characters aren't original, although they are well developed. The scenarious aren't original. The unexpected deaths of major characters, while suspenseful and appreciated, aren't original. The gore and violence, not original. I am not wanting to be a jerk, just to discuss: What aspect of Walking Dead is original in any way? <p> This is maybe being a little bit of a jerk, but even the twist in Invincible has been done before, (in New Mutants way back when, even) although the aftermath is explored in a fresh way, so I'll say that one is at least somewhat original.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 3:11 p.m. CST

    optimous

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    His site sucks because it's all "I'm so intellectual" bullshit about how Morrison is great (so I'm shocked that you don't like it). He's right about your plot summary review and Hulk tho.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 3:15 p.m. CST

    we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    by Series7

    Check out my review site! Its fucking tight. optimous would agree. I'm way behind on my reviews though, I'll put some up tonight or tomorrow. <P>http://tinyurl.com/meyrun

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 3:16 p.m. CST

    Walking Dead

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    The new twist is that it isn't just a two hour movie then it's over. The new twist is that it's a serialized zombie story that is ongoing, allowing for the well developed characters that you like.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 3:16 p.m. CST

    Gooseud

    by CountZero

    I'm just saying that when someone says that Morrison's writing is about 8th dimensional unicorns made of sentient chocolate pudding (see? I can make up dumb random shit too!) it suggests that the person automatically assumes it's meaningless, which in turn suggests an inability or a refusal to engage with the writing on anything other than the most superficial level, which even further suggests that the person doesn't have a lot of experience with writing that isn't completely one-dimensional. Hence my suggestion to read some books every now and then. I'm not saying Morrison is perfect, or that he always hits it out of the park. There's plenty of Morrison comics I don't think are successful. But I'm not dismissing it as gibberish.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 3:19 p.m. CST

    Morrison's X-men

    by Joenathan

    I don't understand how they're original, but Invincible isn't.<br><Br>As for Walking Dead. I'll agree with you. Technically, yes, survivors surviving a zombie apocalypse and discovering that they are just as much monsters as the zombies are, has been done before, but does that make it bad? I mean, can't you explore a genre? Does everything have to have a "new" twist? Why can't you take the old girl out for a spin?<br><br>To me, I think Unoriginal means cheap copy. Like the original concepts behind most of Image's offerings were initially. Things like Invincible, however, take the idea of the Alien Defender and push at it's boundaries, it digs around at what makes the idea work. And even if there are similarities, for the most part, it is it's own thing. How much at fault can you be if your character shares some origin commonalities?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 3:23 p.m. CST

    CountZero

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Your a nerdy Morrison-lover. Go apologize for his hackery with your fancy talk somewhere else. Maybe at Milla's site.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 3:29 p.m. CST

    Series7

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Your site looks OK. At least it isn't some "blah blah blah I'm so smart because I understand Morrison's nonsense" site. Do you agree optimous? Does he use the right fonts and paragraphs and shit?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 3:30 p.m. CST

    I must admit Mohammad v werewolves made me think "cool!"

    by ironic_name

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 3:42 p.m. CST

    By the way, I hate Wolverine's New Costume.

    by cookylamoo

    He looks like a gray, purple blob with ears. Sort of like the mysterious melter back when people were too lazy to color him.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 3:50 p.m. CST

    What-ev, optimouse...

    by milla jovovich

    I won't bother denying that site belongs to me because there's no way I could convince you otherwise, but it's just one of many comic book related websites I check. Like newsarama.com or comicbookresources.com. Maybe those are mine, too. Here's another: http://tinyurl.com/dmva3l

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 4:11 p.m. CST

    Fancy Talk

    by CountZero

    I'm guessing you mean "education."

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 4:36 p.m. CST

    Thats the genius of Kirkman

    by gooseud

    he takes the old saws of the industry and MAKES them original. Can you imagine that pitch meeting for Walking Dead? "Yeah so its gonna be a zombie book. Whats that? No, no black gas or zombie cows or zombie vampires. Just a regular old zombie book, no gimmicks." I mean, how did that ever even get greenlit? Or a book about a young superhero coming of age? (Yawn). Or taking Ant-Man and making him obnoxious and evil? Ive said it before: Kirkman takes really boring, normal, plain ideas and makes them awesome. Ennis takes really really awesome ,amazing, "I cant WAIT to read that!!" ideas and underachievingly makes them kinda lame. I mean, whats better, Crossed or Walking Dead?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 4:44 p.m. CST

    Morrison

    by gooseud

    For example, Seven Soldiers. I didnt get it. I didnt like it. I found it degenerated into something I didnt get, and I stopped remotely caring. However, I realize thats probably just me, so I just dont talk about it. Some people liked it, some people didnt, I'm in the didnt camp. No biggy, but I'm not going to sit around bitching about it. However, I mention Final Crisis because I think that the general opinion of 97% of the comic-reading public is that it was shite, and probably the single most pretentious book ever released. Therefore, in summary: Seven Soldiers, a book that I personally found obtuse and uninteresting, therefore dont care. FC: terrible. However, I would hope that any pro-Morrison guy (of which I am one, partially) wouldnt fall back on that beyond-cliche response of "Well, maybe YOU just didnt get it because you arent smart enough". Groans. Thats up there with green boxing gloves on the groan-o-meter.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 4:46 p.m. CST

    I actually agree...

    by Homer Sexual

    As has been said, not much is really original at this point, so saying something isn't original is not a terrible criticism. I even acknowledge that Invincible is at least a bit original. <p> Just cause Walking Dead isn't original doesn't mean it's not good. I did say it's the bomb, after all. <p> Last week I bought so many comics I am only halfway through the stack. Wolverine Origins, I read last night, it was quite good. Wild Child was totally revamped...didn't even realize it was supposed to be Wild Child. Omega Red actually seemed like a tough and threatening enemy, and Romulus was FINALLY shown. Hopefully this storyline concludes with a bang.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 4:46 p.m. CST

    Ennis

    by Joenathan

    I think there are just Ennis people and Not Ennis people, so, lets say I'm in a editor. Garth ennis walks into my office to pitch something.<br><br>"Hi."<br><br>"No. Don't sit down! Get out!"<br><br>"But for an Ennis person:<br><br>"Will there be ass rape, Garth?"<br><br>"Pssshh... look who you're asking..."<br><br>"SOLD!"

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 4:48 p.m. CST

    Boxing Gloves

    by Joenathan

    If Geoff Johns includes ONE Black Lantern boxing glove splash page, I will purchase all of his Green Lantern trades and call him my King.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 4:48 p.m. CST

    And...

    by Joenathan

    that was a ZOMBIFIED Black Lantern Boxing glove

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 4:50 p.m. CST

    Herogasm

    by Homer Sexual

    Didn't like the latest issue so much. Pretty boring, way too heavy politics. Not enough costumes. Actually missed all the vulgar nudity and superhero action. This is not a book I've bought for the "deep thoughts." I have bought it for exactly what Ennis gets criticized for: Lots of super-powered people behaving in a debauched manner. I knew this one would end up going down like this.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 4:51 p.m. CST

    I mean, whats better, Crossed or Walking Dead?

    by cookylamoo

    Crossed!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 4:51 p.m. CST

    Gooseud

    by CountZero

    "You didn't get it because you're not smart enough, "on the obnoxiousness scale, falls around the same place as "I didn't get it, therefore it is meaningless and pretentious." See what I'm saying?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 4:54 p.m. CST

    Gooseud

    by CountZero

    i.e. they're both equally fuckin' arrogant.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 4:55 p.m. CST

    I liked Seven Soldiers

    by Joenathan

    except the last issue

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:02 p.m. CST

    my CountZero imitation:

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    "Look at me I'm so smart and educated! I understand undecypherable nonsense so much better than you because blah blah blah. Maybe you should read a bunch of books like me so that you could be an apologist for hack comic book writers too. Blah blah blah."

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:05 p.m. CST

    mad_skillz

    by CountZero

    That's actually pretty good. Do Bugs Bunny!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:09 p.m. CST

    ha ha smart guy

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Your so smart that you like Morrison and as gooseud said 97% of us thinks that he's shit. So learn to love your minority status buddy. Be a condesending jerk some more about how smart and educated you are.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:11 p.m. CST

    Everyone agrees:

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Morrison sucks. Except optimous douche whose recently become an apologist. But all of the other reviewers here pretty much agree with me that Morrison should be shot.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:14 p.m. CST

    97%

    by CountZero

    Actually he said 97% hated Final Crisis, not Grant Morrison. Anyway, statistics can prove anything. 67% of people know that.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:15 p.m. CST

    Sweet Christmas

    by Mr.FTW

    Again with the Morrison debates, can we all just agree that he is a very polarizing writer and be done with it? Personally I think he is better writing out of continuity self contained stories and if that was all he did he wouldn't be as polarizing but the nonstop he sucks/he rules business, can't we just let it die?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:18 p.m. CST

    Also...

    by Mr.FTW

    I forgot to mention Stargirl in my post earlier today, that makes 5 "girls" in DC that are blue eyed blondes. I think they should just pit them all on a team with Black Cannary as their mentor/leader.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:36 p.m. CST

    67% of people

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    Did you learn that statistic in college smart guy? I understood FC just as well as you did but the difference is that I have good taste and I know that it sucks big sweaty hairy donkey balls. You obviously know what those taste like yourself. So, it's a matter of taste not intelligence and I totally "get it" but I just don't like it because it sucks. See the difference? I sold the first 4 issues of FC back to the store so that I could use the $ for GOOD comics not undecypherable garbage by a hack.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:38 p.m. CST

    I agree with Mr. FTW

    by we_pray_for_mad_skillz

    enough about Morrison. We've wasted too much time on his hack ass already.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:40 p.m. CST

    zombies are a fad that jumped the shark in the 70s

    by ironic_name

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:40 p.m. CST

    mad_skillz

    by CountZero

    Are you even reading what I'm writing? I said I didn't read Final Crisis. Well I read about 2 issues of it, decided that I didn't like it (the cast-of-hundreds crossover shit isn't for me) and never finished it. I'm not defending Final Crisis. I didn't read it. I DIDN'T READ IT.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:42 p.m. CST

    mad_skillz

    by CountZero

    Suddenly I'm hungry for a big plate of sweaty hairy donkey balls.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:52 p.m. CST

    Morrison -- Zero, Milla and More

    by optimous_douche

    Count -- Yes, I know Morrison uses literary references, but he also jumbles them around a lot. I give you kudos for being able to have the time to place them all back together as Morrison intended them to be. Sorry, I don't have the time to do research to enjoy a comic. And, most of those "jumbled" ramblings were spouted from a guy in pig mask dancing to disco music. Was the intent to really make sense? Perhaps, in the mind of a lunatic...from the Moons of Albacore.<p> Milla -- Apologies, I did make the assumption the site belonged to you. I just assumed by the way you were praising the virtues of a site that so clearly sucks balls from a readability stand-point that only the owner would defend it.<p> I think I got hit a few more times, I need to go back and see.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 5:54 p.m. CST

    FTW

    by optimous_douche

    Good point. Perhaps continuity is Morrison's kryptonite at least at DC.<p> Yeah, I kind of liked X-Men. Even if it had some rough spots (towards the end) it was a refreshing departure from the same old.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 6:03 p.m. CST

    Optimous

    by CountZero

    Read what I said again - I said that you DIDN'T have to read specific books to understand this Batman comic, there are no specific literary references in this issue that I'm aware of (unless you count The Killing Joke as literature) but in general, reading more books might be useful in developing a broader, deeper ability to read into a written text, so that you don't automatically assume that it's just a jumble of nonsense. Come on guys, I'm using pretty plain language here. If you can't even read a message board post properly no wonder you have trouble with a whole comic book.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 6:08 p.m. CST

    Heres my pro-Morrison comment of the day:

    by gooseud

    I didnt think the end of his X-Men run was nearly as bad as everyone else seemed to. Theres a Morrison ending that some people didnt get that I actually comprehended just fine and thought wasnt that bad at all. Why? Because I'm a GENIUS!!! MWAAHAHAAHAHAH!!! I kid I kid.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 6:09 p.m. CST

    FTW is right

    by gooseud

    I have no idea why I allow myself to be drawn into these Morrison debates, especially when I'm NOT even trashing the guy. Thats it for me today.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 6:10 p.m. CST

    Joe/Seven Soldiers/Last Issue

    by gooseud

    Yeah, that "last issue" trend seems to be the bugaboo for.....wait, shit, I just broke my vow made one post above. Never mind.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 6:14 p.m. CST

    Ennis tricked me again, actually

    by gooseud

    The Boys had been rolling right along, I was quite enjoying the current Boys vs. Payback run.....until the most recent wrap up issue which came out today. Horrible. Plus, next issue is the origin of Mother's Milk, which judging from the cover, is going to be exactly what you would expect it to be coming from Ennis, and that aint a compliment, believe me. I wish I could quit you, Garth.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 6:34 p.m. CST

    Good Idea FTW

    by optimous_douche

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 6:36 p.m. CST

    Crack-Head Morrison is a one-hit wonder.

    by Uncle Stan

    I remember his run on Animal Man being interesting. After that it was all a crap-slide. Doom Patrol? Don't make me laugh. It was a diarrhea-fest. Final Crisis was pretentious fan-boy level shit. I wiped my ass with Batman: RIP. I'm tired of hearing Nancy-boys praising his scrotum-zits and going on about the depth of his "work." I have a degree in English literature and I tell you there's nothing there. It's utter shit. As long as you buy his dribble, he'll continue to smoke his crack pipe.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 7:36 p.m. CST

    Who's digging Animal Man now?

    by Series7

    Fucking store didn't have a copy of Last Resort! Someone will pay.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 8:06 p.m. CST

    Marvel Zombies 5=Kinda mean.

    by drewlicious

    I'm still enjoying it but it is getting seriously cruel. The original was macabre and pretty funny. This one still has some of that humor but apparently everyone reverts to being a psycho. At any rate it looks as if they're going to crossover with the Marvel Apes universe if one of last years issues is any indication. Now that will just be trippy.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 8:13 p.m. CST

    You know what needs to happen in the FF?

    by Continentalop

    One of the members has to die - for real, and stay dead at least as long as Norman Osborn (or at the very least Jean Grey). <P> Why? Because as much as I love the FF, they are stagnant as hell. They have become the most DC-like (old DC) of Marvel comic characters, character who just go back to the status quo every 5 or 6 years. They are totally trapped in amber. <P> What they need is a Death of Gene Grey, a Dark Phoenix Saga, a Jason Todd moment for them to deal with it. It will create a new dynamic within the team and lead to years with of stories for them to develop and explore. And I don't say Kill someone lightly, because I am very anit-comic book killing. But they really need something to shake the FF out of their decades long dull-drums(even Waid's run can be conveniently ignored if you think about what really long lasting impact it had). <p> Also there is nothing that shakes up a family like a death in that family. Just look at the Godfather for how big of impact that had on the characters in that movie when Sonny and then the Don died.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 8:15 p.m. CST

    New Warriors in the 90's

    by Disney_Retcond_my_STD

    Is it me or was Fabian's run on that title the stuff of legend. Glad we still have Nova.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 8:39 p.m. CST

    HEAR THAT GURGLING? THAT'S OPTIMOUS...

    by Doctor Cosmic

    ...as he chokes down Grant Morrison's cock and baby batter. So we're all idiots and morons because we don't easily and eagerly bend over to be ass-fucked by drug-head Eurotrash Grant Morrison's "writing?" Please. Get over yourself. Just because I (and others like me) prefer Bruce Wayne, the TRUE Batman, to the wannabe circus pretender, we aren't beneath you. Though I'm sure you'll be beneath Grant after his next issue comes out. Doc

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 8:44 p.m. CST

    Ultimate FF

    by gooseud

    was friggin awesome. The first 40 issues or so of that book was great (and Ellis's Ult. Annihilus run was incredible, one of my fave runs in recent history) , so does that mean the characters are stale or just that a new approach is needed? (Shrugs) Having said that, that book hit an instant fall-off-a-cliff wall with the dreaded, feared, and much-hated Ult. Diablo run, which was so bad that I literally dropped the book on the spot and never looked back. Ultimate Doom was also really lame in that he was basically exactly like regular Doom....not a bad thing, I suppose, but much more potential there in an Ultimate context.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 8:45 p.m. CST

    Gee, Doc

    by gooseud

    tell us how you really feel!!

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 8:58 p.m. CST

    Goose, if a new approach is needed...

    by Continentalop

    ...doesn't that imply that they are stale? <P> I think a lot of guys could come in and just start a completely different approach, the problem is wouldn't that go against the tone and change the nature of the characters? If you just come in and have everyone act different without any sort of motivation or reason, doesn't that just feel false and fake. <P> Like I said, I am not a fan of comic book deaths, I think they smack me to much of obvious gimmick and as lazy writing usually, but if a good writer could come along and had one of the FF die and that death had a real impact on the comic and the characters, I would be all for it. <P> Of course, if such change could also be implemented without a death, hey, I'm all for that too.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:01 p.m. CST

    And I hated Ultimate FF

    by Continentalop

    Just like I hated all things Ultimate. Just my personal taste - I don't really like "alternative" versions of characters because it usually feels like some writers are just trying to steal the thunder of a better and more popular character. I would rather see a new character than one I am familiar with presented in a "new" way. Having Cap act like an asshole doesn't smack me as good writing, it just seems like shock tactics and an attention grabbing device...

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 9:21 p.m. CST

    Ult FF

    by igregory

    hit the skids when Mike Carey came on. FF should be sci-fi, not LOTR fantasy land, which seems to be his forte. Want to like Hickman, but will probably drop the book now. Want to shake things up, kill the kids.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:12 p.m. CST

    Stupid to comment on this, but oh well.

    by Deathpool

    Someone mentioned how Morrison, Moore, and other writers should write for the fans. This is the worst thing to do in any form of writing, ever. You have to write for yourself, write something you think is good. That way at least you can please one person -- yourself -- while pandering has no guarantees to please anyone.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:20 p.m. CST

    Good writing and reviews. I feel the same

    by hallmitchell

    Outside of Kevin Smith. Nothing that exciting is happening in comics right now. Stop playing safe guys. I'm over EVENT comics for a while.

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 10:20 p.m. CST

    Kevin Smith - my favourite comics writer.

    by hallmitchell

    It's great to see humour back in comics. Does everything have to be so dark?

  • Sept. 2, 2009, 11:47 p.m. CST

    Let me guess.......

    by DrMorbius

    Another week and still no mention of<P>CAPTAIN AMERICA WHITE #1.<P>MARVEL SUCKS HIND TEET~

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 5:33 a.m. CST

    I like how mad skillz insults people--

    by Laserhead

    --by calling them 'smart' and suggesting they went to 'college.' Like some bitter yokel who cleans portable toilets for a living, who sees a kid reading a book and says, "Whatcha reading fer? Ain't nothing worth learning in no book!"<p>Also, Brian Michael Bendis is the worst, hackiest writer in all of comicdom.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 6:22 a.m. CST

    It's Nice to Dream Doc Cosmic

    by optimous_douche

    But Bruce Wayne is gone (for now).<p> So, you can either not read any Batman books, vote with your wallet and hope it makes a difference, which is noble, good luck.<p> Or you can find the silver lining in everything that's going on.<p> Personally, I could care less what you decide to do. I found a Batman book I like, so I buy it. End of story. Who knows, next month all the wheels could fall off and I will be pining for Bruce's return as well.<p> For right now though, I'm enjoying the new dynamic duo.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 6:42 a.m. CST

    Cont- FF/Ult FF

    by gooseud

    Oh thats EXACTLY what I'm implying. In fact, if you could hold up a shining neon light example of staleness in comics, it would probably be the Fantastic Four. I didnt like the Ult. U either, but something about Ult FF just grabbed my attention, it was the only Ult book I ever read (although I hear from basically everyone that Ult Spidey was obviously awesome). Ellis was amazing, Millar was the epitome of kinda dumb wacky fun (that still in my opinion was Millar at his very best). The other guy was right, it was when Carey came on that Ult FF went in the shitter, the Ult Thanos run was odd but promising (hated the art), but after that, yikes. Ult Surfer sucked, Ult Diablo sucked, that Ult russian team sucked, the art sucked. IT legimately makes me kinda a little downcast, because those first 30 issues or so, man was that so so good, probably top 3 of all books I was reading at that moment.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 6:45 a.m. CST

    How could anyone

    by gooseud

    NOT want to see Dick Grayson under the cowl? I'm not even a Batman guy, but come on. We need MORE stuff like this in comics, not less. As long as it is a good team writing and illustrating it, give it a chance. You would really prefer an ageless Bruce Wayne continuing on a never ending loop of battling Riddler and Two Face, locking them up, rinse repeat?

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 7:52 a.m. CST

    Of Course 10 Year Old Robin Can Beat Up

    by Buzz Maverik

    ...grown up opponents. He lives in a world where a guy goes around dressed like a bat and a green haired mime has murdered a billion six people (I counted yesterday). You know, comic books...

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 8:31 a.m. CST

    Careful Buzz...

    by Psynapse

    Psycho-badass Neu-Robin just might break your neck for such perfidy.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 9:05 a.m. CST

    Goose/Ult FF

    by Joenathan

    You're right. Much like Ultimate Spider-man (which is also awesome), I was never a fan of their regular continuity counter-parts. I read them, occasionally, but usually... no thank you. However both Ultimate versions drew me in. I dropped FF at the Ultimate Diablo storyline, as well, but until then... great stuff. Ultimate Spider-man is still awesome. There isn't another comic today that has consistantly delivered fun, kick ass superhero stuff for so long, the majority of which was all the by the same creative team. If you haven't read it, go find the trades.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 9:08 a.m. CST

    The problem is CONTINUITY

    by Joenathan

    Comics should exist within easily malleable pocket universes that can be separated and broken off as needed. Dick should stay Batman forever in his own comic. Bruce Wayne can be in the other. Classic Avengers stories can be told in one book in the classic style while the New Avengers take on the new Masters of Evil in the current book (the last issue of which is great). Rock solid Continuity and the tards who demand and police it are the cancer that is killing comics.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 9:16 a.m. CST

    The end IS nigh......

    by Psynapse

    "Rock solid Continuity and the tards who demand and police it are the cancer that is killing comics."<p>Once again, Joenathan and I are in complete agreement. That rain of toads must be due any minute now.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 9:29 a.m. CST

    Agreed Joen

    by optimous_douche

    Continuity was someithing I was definitely a stickler for in my younger years -- until I kept ageing and the charachters didn't.<p> We’re truly looking at an unprecedented time in comics, when even the new kids of the Marvel characters would now be eligible for social security.<p> We either accept reboots and retcons or merely see a regurgitation of the same old same old for all time.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 10:07 a.m. CST

    Batman and progression

    by Mr.FTW

    I'm not sure if Doc Cosmic is the same guy who was ranting and raving a few months ago when Dick took over but his posts read the same. I understand his argument that Batman isn't the same kind of legacy character as say Flash or Green Lantern but I think any real Batman fan would be excited to so Dick take over for a while, for his 70 year story arc to finally come to fruition.<p> It's not like Bruce will never be coming back, we all know he will. Until then there will be plenty of graphic novels or stories like Keven Smith's that feature Bruce if someone just can't stand Grayson that much not to mention the 80+ years of material you can go back and revisit.<p>

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 10:22 a.m. CST

    Which is why...

    by Joenathan

    the reaction to Bendis "killing" Hawkeye was so funny... Did you think he'd NEVER be back? Why not just go read the older stories? ESPECIALLY because, lets face it, up until a few years ago, the only thing new about some of these character's adventures was that they were wearing an Ipod instead of a walkman. Dark Reign and these Event comics, to me, is like a breath a fresh air because its change. Finally change. Sure, it won't last forever, but for now, consquences and continuing change. I'm sure at some point in the nearish future we can all "look forward" to Spidey being married again and working as a photographer at the Daily Bugle and man, is that JJ Jameson sure a big meanie to poor ol' Petey who can't catch a break, despite the fact that he's a super-genius superhero married to a super model, but hey... there's no song like an old song, right?

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 10:35 a.m. CST

    I envision

    by Joenathan

    Mini-bursts of continuity. Right now, we're in the Bendis/Bru/Millar era (or whatever we want to call it, go ahead and make your jokes, that was a soft toss set up on my part...), and when they move on, so should the majority of their continuity. <br><br>At that point, Marvel should find a new main story direction/main line, because there is no need to force people to have to know a decade of stories just so they can keep up currently. Those of us that choose to do so, still will, but until that model is dumped, until you cease to allow issue 400s... you don't get new readers because the time and money needed to join in is too much for too little return. <br><br>Long runs, when it's got a team that's really clicking, are great, but often time there is too much sag. Creators should come on and write 24 issue or so (more or less) bursts. A story with a beginning, a middle, and an end. A single adventure. Get in, tell it, get out, make room for the next guy who can use what they want from the previous run and ignore what they don't want. Characters should be treated like Werewolves or zombies or vampires, there are so basic ground rules in each case, but otherwise, for the most part, go crazy, man, impress me. Do something intetesting.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 10:38 a.m. CST

    Joenathan 1602

    by hst666

    In 1602, it was eventually revealed that the white indian Rogers was from the present and he ended up in the past. I also believe he referred to some sort of strife in what had been his present. In the end he returns to his present, but the 1602 universe lives on.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 10:41 a.m. CST

    joenathan

    by hst666

    With respect to Hawkeye, I really liked him in Thuderbolts and his assisting with the redemption of that team. Then Bendis needed him for some cheap action.<p><p>Although, his death is not really that big a deal. It's what he did to the Scarlet Witch that I really disliked.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 10:41 a.m. CST

    Continuity is only useful

    by Psynapse

    when mined for new concepts like Goeff Johns is doing with Green Lantern, IMHO.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 10:41 a.m. CST

    What's that?

    by Joenathan

    snuck out the next morning?

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 10:42 a.m. CST

    *GEOFF Johns

    by Psynapse

    *damn typos and lack of an edit feature*

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 10:43 a.m. CST

    Continuity

    by Joenathan

    Because comics are full of great stuff. Creators should respect and play off it, but they shouldn't be shackled to it.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 10:50 a.m. CST

    Blackest Titans, Batman/Robin, New Avengers

    by Homer Sexual

    I read these three last night to come talk about them before everyone leaves until next week. I actually only bought the Blackest Night Titans because of the review here. I am not (anymore) a fan of the Starfire/Cyborg crew. And Donna Troy is the worst...I didn't realize her ridiculous husband Terry and her had a baby then they died. Whatever. Still, the art was awesome and the development of Hawk/Dove made this book a pleasure to read, I look forward to the next issue. <p> Batman and Robin was pretty good and had awesome art. But Quitely really makes Robin look like a kid, and that's a bit jarring, to see such a tiny little kid kicking a lot of ass. I also felt that the book reinforced what another poster said here: The story is interesting, but doesn't draw in the reader. Much like FC, it seemed cold and bloodless. I appreciated it for how good it was, but I didn't really "feel" it. <p> New Avengers...the cover worried me because Mockingbird's old look is seriously dated. But she had her new look and kicked butt. This was, indeed, one of the better issues of New Avengers. My heart would fill with glee to see the Wrecking Crew really pound Osborne's face in, but I am certain (unfortunately) that Norman will regain the upper hand next issue and he'll be the king of the world again (ugh).

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 10:52 a.m. CST

    Well said Joenathan

    by Psynapse

    Nail on the head if I do say so myself.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 10:57 a.m. CST

    I'm with hst 666

    by Homer Sexual

    That's a good joke, Joe. <p> But I agree that Bendis' turning a character who was definitely Marvel's main female character for many years into an hysterical would-be baby-mama husband-murderer still pisses me off as well. <p> However, I do expect her to eventually return and I will wait patiently for that time.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 11:21 a.m. CST

    Scarlet Witch

    by Joenathan

    I think she needed this. Her powers were too vague and that whole gypsy thing that Perez jizzs over needed to go, big time, worse than Dazzler's roller skates. <br><br>Besides, so far, I haven't seen any characters tossed away and discarded in this current era. Each character these current creators have "broken" recently has come back stronger. Cap, Iron Man, Thor, Iron Fist, etc. 10 years ago, who would have thought that any of these characters would be top shelf again?

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 11:24 a.m. CST

    Mockingbird

    by Joenathan

    I am a big fan of her new look and attitude. I wondered about the cover too, when will the covers acknowledge the costume change?

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 11:36 a.m. CST

    Continuity

    by Series7

    DC are Marvel need to fucking kill off some B-level character for good. Fuck'em. That character can pop up in One shots or "graphic novels", but in the main story lines, they are dead and gone. No REBIRTHS no one else taking over for them. I smell summer event.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 11:38 a.m. CST

    I mean Daredevil is the perfect

    by Series7

    Example of someone who could be killed for good. A) He's just human. B) He's movie wasn't that good and no one is looking for a reboot or sequel so I think he's done in theaters. C) from what I gather his comic has not been selling well. So it either will be a cool event, or no one will even care. And after his death you have a whole rise of Kingpin saga.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 11:50 a.m. CST

    Roller Disco Dazzler

    by Psynapse

    Was fucking awesome. Bitch even had a disco ball necklace. You can't get any cooler than a disco ball necklace.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 11:51 a.m. CST

    Good Thought Series But...

    by optimous_douche

    Everyone felt the same about Jason Todd and Barry Allen and they came back.<p> Somewhere is a fan of every hero. Just look at Psynape's ode to Dazzler above.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 12:03 p.m. CST

    Ode to Dazzler

    by Joenathan

    http://tiny.cc/YS55J

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 12:22 p.m. CST

    Well Barry Allen

    by Series7

    There are more flashes and stuff. I just think Daredevil would be an easy one to kill off. Maybe have someone pretned to be him for a while and just give up, kind of like Fist did. And if fans want him back so bad, write a fucking one off graphic novel. <P> Then again I'm pleading to the companies that are willing to charge $4 for a fucking newspaper.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 12:24 p.m. CST

    Like I thought maybe I was just with the big fan

    by Series7

    Boys on this site, that defended Wednesday comics here. But no, fucking everyone loves that shit. I'm sorry, I think because it was a hit we are going to be fucked on price points for a while.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 12:29 p.m. CST

    You're totally wrong, Buzz.

    by rev_skarekroe

    The Joker isn't a mime. He talks all the time.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 12:30 p.m. CST

    Interesting fact about Dazzler

    by Psynapse

    Dazzler #1 PRE-SOLD over 400,000 copies. True Story.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 12:36 p.m. CST

    Damn

    by Series7

    Nothing even gets close to that these days.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 12:39 p.m. CST

    The Joker...

    by Bluejack

    is a mime, just a lousy mime. Mediocre master criminal now that I think about it.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 12:40 p.m. CST

    BTW, Arkham Asylum

    by Bluejack

    is pretty good. just finished it on normal level. It is a little short, but there are many Easter eggs and the fighting with gizmos and batarangs is a lot of fun.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 12:48 p.m. CST

    Morrison

    by Bluejack

    Can be just fantastic at times and then just confusing others. His JLA run was iconic. All-Star Superman was very good for me as well. I really did not dig The New X-Men. I dropped the X-books about mid way through that arc. I think the guy gets too tricky for his own good. Doom Patrol was right on the border for me. When I was younger and collecting Doom Patrol I didn't get it. Now that I'm older, I went back and read it nad I love "The League of Dada," the Scissormen etc. That was a creative and fun run where he balanced his crazy ideas with a narative thread you could follow.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 12:58 p.m. CST

    Uhh....Bluejack?

    by Psynapse

    Mimes are silent. Joker's about the chattiest cathy on the block. Just sayin'.....

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 1:44 p.m. CST

    The reason AS Supes was awesome

    by gooseud

    was because it had all of Morrison's wacky shit, but more heart then any comic he has written before or since, the exact opposite of FC. That book has heart practically bleeding off the pages.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 1:44 p.m. CST

    The reason AS Supes was awesome

    by gooseud

    was because it had all of Morrison's wacky shit, but more heart then any comic he has written before or since, the exact opposite of FC. That book has heart practically bleeding off the pages.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 1:54 p.m. CST

    ULT FF 1-6

    by gooseud

    is my favorite "backstory character arc, introducing......" intro run ever. Just like AS Supes has heart and love for the character bleeding off the pages, that 6 issues "Hi, my name is Ult FF" run has isnt-this-cool fun just busting off the pages

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 2:38 p.m. CST

    I liked

    by Joenathan

    the original Marvel Zombies arc, too.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 3:38 p.m. CST

    Actually Joenathan, I think continuity is necessary

    by Continentalop

    For the Marvel Universe. It is what made it so unique when it first appeared - the fact that they kept track of what had happened to the Porcupine between his appearance fighting the X-Men for Count Nefario and his most recent appearance fighting the Defenders in "Defender for a Day" story line made it seem more "realistic" (and in between that time I think he fought Nighthawk, Yellowjacket and the Wasp, and I am sure someone more knowledgeable than me will be able to list a couple of other appearances). <P> I think the problem is lack of change. And I am going to do a complete 180 degree turn on some of my previous post, and say that most characters, especially Marvel, are stuck in the same mode over and over, and any sort of change they under go is suddenly reversed, such as Brand New Day, and back to the status quo they go again. <P> I can understand why this happens - they are expensive properties they bring in a lot of money. If you change too much they might lose their appeal and profitability - but if you go back to the Silver and Bronze Age, before these characters become worth so much, you'll see that they did undergo drastic changes in the status quo and those changes weren't just retconned or reversed a couple of years later.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 3:40 p.m. CST

    And I hated the original Marvel Zombies Arc

    by Continentalop

    Because I was wondering "Why the hell isn't this story taking place in the regular Marvel Universe?" A group of super-heroes going over to an alternate timeline and find all the heroes zombified; why did that have to be in a Ultimate comic?

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 3:53 p.m. CST

    Yeah

    by Joenathan

    but making creators and readers be continuously aware of such things as where Porcupine was before he showed up in Defenders decades ago is strangling comics and inimidating new readers. When continuity works, great stories are told, but mostly its just a stone around the medium's neck.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 3:54 p.m. CST

    Ultimate objection...

    by Joenathan

    I don't understand why that matters...

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 4:01 p.m. CST

    My Ultimate Objection

    by Continentalop

    I don't mind that others like Ultimate comics, but my problem is that I, personally, have invested a lot of emotion and energy (and fucking money) into the mainstream universe. And it seems like they can rarely come up with a good story in Marvel 616. <P> So when I see a half decent idea in the Ultimate Universe, a comic book universe that will most likely die sometime and just be a brief moment in the overall history of Marvel Comics, I feel like I was robbed. I mean, I hate Millar's work, but the idea that Cap has a son is something that makes me go "Shit. Why didn't they think of that earlier." I could totally see that as the follow up arc after Brubaker is dead, but no, it is in the Ultimate Universe.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 4:07 p.m. CST

    Joenathan, RE=Continuity

    by Continentalop

    I agree and disagree. I think that knowing where the Porcupine was last, or dropping a little old history like what Slott does is fun for both the older and even newer fans. I laughed my ass off when he brought back Brynocki from Shang-Chi. <P> But I do agree staying completely controlled and subservient to continuity is a bad thing. A villain shows up, just briefly mention where he was last and if he is an obscure villain maybe show his origin, we don't need the entire life story of the character. <P> I prefer rules over continuity anyways. Rules prevents continuity errors - like having rules for magic like they used too, or rules about how someone's powers operate. Don't just change stuff to fit your needs, work with what has already been established - it makes it a much more interesting universe.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 4:10 p.m. CST

    On a personal note

    by Continentalop

    I realized Marvel was in trouble when everyone was referring to it by it's timeline name, 616. We shouldn't have to refer to Marvel Universe as anything other than the Marvel Universe. I knew when I saw the 616 numbers appearing Marvel was becoming more like the old DC universe (and DC is strangely becoming more like Marvel).

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 4:43 p.m. CST

    Changes

    by Mr.FTW

    Something that I thik would really help liven up comics and would make a lot of sense, especially in the Marvel U, is more cross over interaction between heroes and villians. So much of the Marvel U is based in New York City yet 9 times outof 10 when the Sandman or Vulture is terrorizing the city only Spider-Man shows up. In DC you do have the different Cities like Gotham, Keystone, Central, Metropolis which does make sense that they might have their own cast of villians but Marvel? I've never understood why in their knit together universe, inhabiting the same city whay there isn't cross over. Why aren't the Avengers assembling when Mole-man or Magneto are causing trouble? Why doesn't Spidey stumble onto an assination attemp by Bullseye? Why hasn't the Punisher tried to take any of these guys out? The hero/villian exclusiveness has never made sense to me in Marvel, I think it would be a lot more fun and interesting if these characters mixed up a little. I'm not talking about one off, team up or What Ifs, interaction should be the status quo with rogues galleries and rivals being the back bone.

  • Sept. 3, 2009, 4:54 p.m. CST

    My problem with Continuity

    by Series7

    Is that I wasn't born when all this shit happened. And making people who are just getting into comics having to go back and learn or read all that shit is kind of a pain in the ass. Like think about 50 years from now how much MORE history in comic their will have been. People will have majors in comic history or something. Until they have Matrix needles to the back of the head, continuity and character history is more of an annoying fan thing then anything.

  • Sept. 4, 2009, 11:10 a.m. CST

    Continuity Was Never As Rigid As You Think...

    by Buzz Maverik

    These days, we take our comics way too seriously and yet, in another big butt smooch to the current editorial mandate, we want to ditch continuity because, essentially, we want to do whatever (mostly)Marvel tells us. We want to make their jobs easier. When was the last time somebody made YOUR job easier? Mine gets harder every day.<p>I like Continental Op's Porcupine example. Let's say that Millar wants to trot out something about Porkie's fetish for sharp objects so that we'll all be shocked. Should he have to read every single Porpupine story, like that weird one in CAPTAIN AMERICA where he and Whirlwind and Batroc lured Cap to a TV studio for, like, a one page fight? No. Should somebody in editorial know the last time Porcupine appeared? Yeah. If it has any bearing on MM's latest work of brilliance, a one line reference (like if we saw Porky impale himself to death in TALES OF PRETENSION #147)then maybe a line is in order.<p>Why?<p>Because since we have to take our comics so seriously, a linkage give the illusion on credibility.<p>I know that each big name, highly paid marquee writer is a Pullitzer Prize winning voice of his generation now who deserves his own universe and is creating all this stuff and making it their own and ... sorry, I was reading Marvel hype/standard interview kit again. Except that, like 99% of these characters WERE created 50+ years ago and most of these stories happened one way or another.<p>But, Buzz, there are no new stories.<p>Right you are, Timmy, and that's something we can't ever let these Shakesphere's For The New Millenium ever forget. Call it Ultimate, say you created it, kink up the characters, slow down the action, throw in some pop culture references that are dated the second the page prints out, but that's still Captain America and the Hulk and the Wasp.<p>These guys don't get it both ways. They want the big bucks, they want to be famous (in a comic shop -- next door at the Postal Annex it's like, "I don't care if you are Brian Mike Benitiz, get the hell back in line, Jack!")so they want to do the characters of the Big Two but they want to deny that the characters are bigger than they are. No, no, no, you want what comes with doing Superman, you do Superman, bay-bee. You want to create and show us your imagination, I'll check out issue one of HUMAN PRIME or whatever where you get to make everything up like the alpha villain Lars Lugo and the sidekick Timmy Tollhouse and the girlfriend Leslie Lee and the dog Primo and...

  • Sept. 4, 2009, 11:20 a.m. CST

    But Continetal Op Is Wrong...

    by Buzz Maverik

    Between Porpupine joining in on Count Nefaria's attack on Valhalla Mountain (thwarted by the all new, all different X-Men on their second mission) and his Defender for a Day thing, he and the Eel realized they were losers ("Bozos" was the word) and attended a seminar in Celestial Mind Control. Unfortunately, Nebulon was behind it and used them in his campaign against the Defenders. A little later, Porkie and some henchmen tried to rob a fashion show (the Millar in me likes to think they were there to kidnap models ala Dennis Hopper in BLUE VELVET kidnapping a lounge singer),which happened to be attended by designer Janet Van Dyne Pym and her future ex-husband Dr. Henry Pym. Billionaire Kyle Richmond was also on hand, probably to scope the aforementioned models before Tony Stark could taint them (yeah, like he already hadn't). Friends of the Pyms were aboard the starship Captain America which had arrived in Earth's orbit to warn of the coming of Korvac and...

  • Sept. 4, 2009, 11:27 a.m. CST

    Continuity does notn have to be daunting.

    by hst666

    I started reading comics in the 70s and this was out of convenience stores, so I often missed issues. (Remember the bagged threepacks). Older stories or previous events would be referenced and all it made me do was want the back issues. It in no way hindered my reading of the current story. The view that it's a weight is silly. There is no need to reference prior history if you don't want to. As someone else pointed out, if a character died previously, a quick explanation of their breathing status would be preferred by long time readers.

  • Sept. 4, 2009, 11:31 a.m. CST

    Continentalop/Ultimate objection

    by Joenathan

    It is DIRECTLY due to the overwhelming burden of continuity that possiblly radical/challenging stories appear more often in the Ultimate universe lately (which, at this point, I don't think is going to just fade away at this point). What is still unclear is why you see them as so seperate that you can't just read both and enjoy them. I mean, are you such a slave to continuity that you can't handle a non-616 Cap story? That's kind of weird, man.

  • Sept. 4, 2009, 11:33 a.m. CST

    Continentalop/Continuity

    by Joenathan

    I do agree that some basic rules are nessecary and there's nothing wrong with background or continuing previous stories. I just think that stories in the 70s being held as irrefutable cannon is going to seem intimidating to new readers who were, say, born in the 80s...

  • Sept. 4, 2009, 11:35 a.m. CST

    Also,

    by Joenathan

    yes, I agree, forcing a character to meet the needs of your story instead allowing the story to form naturally is the surest sign of a crap writer.

  • Sept. 4, 2009, 11:40 a.m. CST

    FTW

    by Joenathan

    Good point, I think there was a funny answer to that somewhere, it might have been the live action Tick, where it was insinuated that certain villians are "the property" of that Hero and it is a major cape faux-pas to gank someone's villian. Kind of a funny super-hero culture thing.

  • Sept. 4, 2009, 11:46 a.m. CST

    hst666

    by Joenathan

    IT doesn't have to be intimidating, but just like when you come into any subject way after the fact, it is. <br><Br>And I'm not saying dump it all or pretend it all didn't happen. I just think 400 issues in a row is stupid and prevents new readers. There should be new number 1s every couple of years. Like Once Cap was re-established by Bru, then killed... End of that volume. Then Bru starts the next volume, which is the story of Bucky accepting the Mantle and it starts with a new #1. If a few months in between to work out the story is need? Great. Then we don't have to suffer through the crappy fill in issues.<br><br>All that being said though, certain books do require continual runs, like Walking Dead, but I can't think of a single Superhero book that does.

  • Sept. 4, 2009, 12:11 p.m. CST

    Joe

    by Mr.FTW

    That is funny but like I said more interaction between heroes and villians, especially in Marvel's New York, would help liven up the superhero books and help against the same stories being told over and over again. Putting a hero up against a villian he isn't familiar with would test, educate and help that hero grow along without being quite as redundant as say the 7,451st face off between Supes and Lex or Spidey and the Goblin.<p> Also, I like what you're saying about the volumes and starting over with #1s occasionally. And the taking time to formulate entire story arcs. Take Cap. for instance, after Steve Rogers death that volue could have ended with Bucky taking over then a couple of months off to formulated a 2 year story plan starting with a new Cap. #1. In a smaller icon they could always have a running issue number for hardcore people.<p>Even with the gaps I think you would have tighter stories without the filler like you said and if anything needed to be refrenced thay could always have the boxes that tell you this happend in "blank title" in issues xx-xx.

  • Sept. 4, 2009, 2:44 p.m. CST

    Totally

    by Joenathan

    then we wouldn't get the crappy fill-in artist either, because, to me, nothing is worse than a book that's chugging along with a great artist, like Uncanny was decades ago with Silvestri and then out of no where... BAM! Fucking Rick Leonardi comes in and shits all over everything for two or three issues.

  • Sept. 4, 2009, 8:11 p.m. CST

    Dawn, I remembered the fashion show story

    by Continentalop

    With Yellow Jacket, Wasp and Nighthawk, but totally forgot the Nebulon story.

  • Sept. 4, 2009, 8:12 p.m. CST

    Dawn? I meant Damn.

    by Continentalop

  • Sept. 4, 2009, 8:18 p.m. CST

    My biggest pet peeve about lack of Continuity

    by Continentalop

    Isn't that so-and-so writer forgot Dr. Diabolical's last appearance - the villain has his own life, so a lot could happen since his last appearance - but when they don't know ANYTHING about the character. How often have we seen characters completely written out of, well character, and they had gotten their powers and abilities all wrong. It is like the writer scanned his entry in a Who's Who or Marvel Handbook and liked the way his costume looked so he decided to use him. <p> Continuity isn't just the history of the characters, it is also the history of how they acted and keeping that consistent.

  • Sept. 4, 2009, 8:29 p.m. CST

    BTW, since I mentioned killing off a member of the FF earlier

    by Continentalop

    You know who they also should kill off? Dick Grayson. In fact they should have killed him off before they killed off Bruce Wayne. <P> First off, like Joe always says, you know he'll come back alive so obviously Dick's death would be as permanent as Bruce's. Secondly, when they finally bring Dick back it would add something to his character - a trauma he must deal with that Bruce Wayne never has experienced (and we all know that when Bruce comes back his death will play little impact on his character; what is he going to brood even more?). <P> Finally, while Bruce wouldn't be effected much by his own death (how weird is that? Only in a comic book), think how traumatic and troubled he would be at Dick Grayson's death. Here was someone he was training to take his place when he retires, and now that Bruce is getting older maybe he is thinking it is time to hang up the cowl. Then suddenly his heir (and adopted son) dies, leaving him the heavy task of staying Batman until Drake or Damien are old enough to take over the job. <p>

  • Sept. 5, 2009, 1:04 p.m. CST

    There's no more reason to restart CAP than WALKING DEAD.

    by SleazyG.

    At all.

  • Sept. 5, 2009, 1:05 p.m. CST

    Also? Silvestri is a shitty fill in artist...

    by SleazyG.

    ...who came on X-MEN at the end of Morrison's run and shat all over everything for three issues. They were the only issues of that entire run I didn't like, and I'm pretty sure it was because the godawful art rendered the issues incomprehensible.

  • Sept. 5, 2009, 4:41 p.m. CST

    Buzz Maverik Completely Wrong...

    by Buzz Maverik

    Porcupine wasn't in the gang of Count Nefaria's Ani-Men who took over Valhalla Base in ALL NEW, ALL DIFFERENT X-MEN #94. He was in an earlier group where he met occasional partners the Eel and Plantman (who in my opinion was not qualified to be an Ani-Man but was perhaps a token vegetable. I like Plantman's instant mutations but I always felt sorry for him because you know that he feels inferior to such DC characters as Poison Ivy, Woodrue and Swamp Thing -- plus in that DEFENDERS arc, Luke Cage beat him up and Nebulon nearly blasted a hole through his back).

  • Sept. 5, 2009, 4:44 p.m. CST

    Silvestri

    by Buzz Maverik

    I always found his work kinda scratchy. Plus, he was maybe second or third in a line of X-MEN artists who really couldn't tell a story with images (JR Jr. GOT better, but at first it was like, where are they are why are they doing that and why doesn't it match the last panel, etc).

  • Sept. 5, 2009, 4:51 p.m. CST

    Continuity & Changes -- Getting There Is A ...

    by Buzz Maverik

    ...big part of the fun. Why throw out the last story to *ahem* make the character your own? Show WHY & HOW the character has changed from their last appearance, and WHAT made it happen.<p>On, the other hand, some times these guys just screw up and it's not continuity. I remember reading a Robert Kirkman CAPTAIN AMERICA story a few years back. Kirkman is kind of a traditional guy and probably did his homework. The Marvel characters were not a big part of his background -- oddly, he grew up an Image fan which shows how young he is. He's a writer I like and I'd been championing him as The Next Big Savior of Comics since his SUPER-PATRIOT mini for image. But in this Cap story, these evil agents of something have freed the Skull so he'll work for them. The Skull, true to character, refuses. He says, "I'm grateful, but..." and I spilled my beer. The Skull is not grateful to anyone or anything and would never say that he was. That's not continuity, that's just common comic book sense.

  • Sept. 5, 2009, 5:01 p.m. CST

    Good Example of Changing A Character

    by Buzz Maverik

    Jim Shooter was never my favorite writer (I mean, he invented shock value in mainstream comics) but since you read all my posts carefully you know I mentioned Korvac. Korvac was a Guardians O' The Galaxy villain, sort of your typical Jim Starlin looking cosmic mad man type, with everything under his belly button looking like a mechanical ice cream cone. Shooter didn't create Korvac. Steve Gerber did, for a THOR ANNUAL. Well, Shooter had Korvac become influence by Starhawk & Aleta of the Guardians and seek that power for himself. He was the guy who kidnapped one of the models at the fashion show in the AVENGERS where a Defenders line up drove off Porcupine and his gang. The babe he kidnapped was named Carina and turned out to be the Collector's daughter. Anyway, Korvac ditches the bionic cone butt of his and becomes this god-like hunk in a muscle shirt and jogging shorts throug his love for Carina (I know! I quit reading comics for a long time shortly after this!). This was a big Avengers story, which you'd call an arc these days, and I think they call it the Korvac saga and I really didn't care for any of it, but at least Shooter took an older character and warped him in his own image before our eyes instead of just having Korvac show up looking like a blond, bare lipped Magnum PI with no explanation. I like when they build off the last appearance because you get more, like when you order your Scotch straight up.

  • Sept. 5, 2009, 7:01 p.m. CST

    Continuity helping comic book stories

    by stones_throw

    A perfect example is Jonathan Hickman and Dale Eaglesham’s first issue on FANTASTIC FOUR which, although it got a positive review above, I found deathly dull because it was EXACTLY THE SAME as every other recent first issue on the FANTASTIC FOUR. Not a single difference from Mark Millar on the title, or J. Michael Straczynski before him, or even Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa on MARVEL KNIGHS 4 (remember that?) before that. Each writer thinks they’re starting on a clean slate and it leaves everything just a morass of same-ness. Oh look, there’s the FF taking down a once-cool villain like it was brushing their teeth. Reed acts autistic-savant, Sue acts motherly, Johnny acts like a celebrity-obsessed prick and Ben acts dumb. Quick pause for some nausea-inducing sweetness with the kids and then we’re onto the big sci-fi high concept that will, finally, once and for all, Change Everything. <p>Writers don't read what their predecessors did so the book just goes round in circles. Whereas by far the most successful recent writer on FF (which evidently must be a tricky title to get right) was Dwayne McDuffie, who actually took the care to read what else was going on in the Marvel Universe and tie his book in, meaning we got more than just one-note characters and plots that go nowhere. Of course, when Millar or Hickman hops aboard any development gets jettisoned and we’re back to Square One. <p>MEANWHILE, I’ve also been ploughing my way through the ESSENTIAL HULK VOL. 5 and while the stories can get a bit repetitive it seems like a good example of how to handle comic book continuity. The wider story rumbles on (Betty got married to Glenn Talbot, but he died, but he was actually in Russian prison, but he escaped, but it was a doppelganger designed to assassinate President Ford, now Glenn’s a vegetable, but Bruce Banner’s got to cure him, etc.), but in the meantime Hulk has no shortage of villains to be fighting. When the Abomination appears more than once, there’s carry-over between their battles. When the Missing Link throws down with the Hulk, it’s because of what happened in their last fight, not forgetting the story in X-MEN where they’re also following him. When characters are integrated with whatever other titles they may be appearing in, it creates rather than hinders stories. <p>If only Jonathan Hickman had made the thrown-away battle with the Wizard at the start of last week’s FF the main plotline, a la HULK, rather than whatever latest boredom Reed Richards is up to. I’m sure it must be the writer-led nature of today’s comics that means every FF story is about some seminal idea of Reed’s, rather than the Fantastic Four actually, uh, doing stuff. The Wizard created clones of himself to put inside a robotic Frightful Four specially-modified to take down the FF? Man, that’s a story I want to be reading! Reed Richards built another portal to parallel universes? Wake me up when the next writer starts on FANTASTIC FOUR.

  • Sept. 6, 2009, 6:27 p.m. CST

    And Why Don't These Guys Read The Last Arc?

    by Buzz Maverik

    Using the FF example, if I was working in comics I'd read everything Mark Millar wrote anyway because he's an important force in the Industry and maybe I could learn a few things. Or JMS. Yeah, I know. It's one thing to criticize them as a fans, but as a pro, I'd want to know everything the last few guys did, at least back to Waid and Weiringo, ya know? Even if there was stuff I didn't like, I'd want to know what to avoid. And I'd look for things the fans liked so I could riff on them and maybe get those fans to like my stuff as well. But tha's just me, you see what I'm saying?

  • Sept. 7, 2009, 11:59 a.m. CST

    Mimes

    by Bluejack

    thus my point that the Joker is a crappy mime, with all of the chatty talking and all.

  • Sept. 7, 2009, 12:02 p.m. CST

    Incognito

    by Bluejack

    I really enjoyed the last issue. I was not upset at all that the series was short and self contained. Zack's path towards **Spoiler** neutrality (?), less evil town(?), or Loganland was a great ride.

  • Sept. 7, 2009, 12:04 p.m. CST

    Disney

    by Bluejack

    The sword can cut both ways people. think of the possibilities! Snow White MAX! Cinderella by Ennis. Bendis chats up the Seven Dwarves in 'The Dark Seven Dwarves.'