Comics

AICN COMICS: CREEPY Preview! REVIEWS: DC's WEDNESDAY COMICS! TORCHWOOD! SPIDEY! OUTLAW TERRITORY! & MUCH MORE!!!

Published at: July 15, 2009, 6:26 p.m. CST by ambush bug

#9 7/8/09 #8

The Pull List (Click title to go directly to the review) Special Spinner Rack to the Future Preview of CREEPY #1 WEDNESDAY COMICS #1 OUTLAW TERRITORY VOL.1 (Part I) AMAZING SPIDER-MAN ANNUAL #36 HOWARD CHAYKIN’S AMERICAN FLAGG: DIFINITIVE COLLECTION VOLUMES 1 & 2 THE NOBODY HC GN TORCHWOOD: RIFT WAR TPB WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE WORLD OF TOMORROW? OGN THE WAKING Limited Series: An Advance Review! THE COMPLEAT NEXT MEN VOL. 1 THE GOOD, THE BAD, & THE UGLY #1 BATTLEFIELDS VOL.1: THE NIGHT WITCHES Big Eyes for the Cape Guy presents YOKAIDOCTOR Vol. 1 CHEAP SHOTS!

Ambush Bug here with an extra special whirl on the Spinner Rack. CREEPY #1, Dark Horse’s relaunch of the classic horror series, is due in stores today. You better believe I’m checking it out and I’m sure it’ll get reviewed here on AICN Comics, but the swell chaps and chappettes at Dark Horse provided a sneak peek to whet your whistles until you get to the store later today! Check out the pages below!

CREEPY #1 Writers: Neil Keid, Joe Harris, Dan Braun, Mike Woods Art: Angelo Torres, Bernie Wrightson, Jason Shawn Alexander & more Publisher: Dark Horse Comics Release Date: Today! Go out there and get it!


CREEPY #1 is in stores today!


WEDNESDAY COMICS #1

Writers: Lots of Guys at DC Artists: Likewise Publisher: DC Comics (Obviously) Reviewer: Optimous Douche

This was a lot like dry humping for three hours. Damn enjoyable in parts, mildly chafing in other parts and a climax that you know is just seconds away, but sadly never cums (bar-um-pum). Why? Because you have to wait until next week for 8 more panels, the next stream of consciousness, a new character to enter and have enough time to maybe introduce themselves. In an age of immediate gratification and an ever increasing fan-base of trade waiters salivating for full completed stories, this cartoon strip newspaper concept defies all logic. There’s some good stuff inside these pages, but this format is simply painful.
Also, not to be cheap or anything, but…$4.00 for 15 pages of stories on paper quality so poor that Ben Franklin could have used it to roll his joints seems like an egregious screwing of the fan-base. The last time I was taken advantage of like this, she/he at least bought me dinner first, was kind enough to give me a roofie and I never had to pull out my wallet once. The big houses have always justified price increases by delivering a more polished product; how they justify the spartan WEDNESDAY COMICS at $4.00 an unfolding simply boggles my mind.
Now perhaps there is a demographic out there that has a nostalgic fondness for receiving this rationed depression-era style of doling out a story. Well, demographic, this run-down is for you.
When you transform WEDNESDAY COMICS from its Comic Shop News layout (did your comic shop confuse the two? Mine did) to newspaper format you are greeted with an…ad. Granted it’s a really cool ad announcing the DVD release of “Robot Chicken”’s Episode II, but yeah, it’s still an ad. Keep unfolding and the first story presents it self:
BATMAN: Azzarello/Risso: “Every time I turn this on it’s like I’m signaling failure.” Wow, what a great line delivered by Jim Gordon about the Bat signal. Batman basically agrees and we find out a millionaire has been kidnapped. The millionaire will be killed at midnight and there are no ransom demands. Midnight strikes on the clock…end! Batman is obviously Bruce Wayne (he’s a douche) and by the bat graphic in the intro panel we can assume this vignette is a nod to the golden age. Risso’s art supports my theory, and quite well I might add.
KAMANDI: Gibbons/Sook: The last boy on earth laments being the last boy on earth as he paddles through a submerged New Your City. I’m not a huge fan of dialogue free, narrative heavy comics, but I won’t fault anyone for this approach. Unless Kamandi has a volleyball in front of him with a face painted on it, it would be rather silly for him to speak out loud. This piece ends with Kamandi meeting a mysterious stranger.
SUPERMAN: Arcudi/Bermejo: Superman is fighting an alien that ends up reaching out to him telepathically. Yeah, that’s pretty much it. Bermejo’s art, though, is spectacular - where have they been hiding this guy? He’s not The Gimp, let him out of the basement and put him on a real book please.
DEADMAN: Bullock/Heuck: Again, too much narrative. I now see a pattern forming and I’m reminded of why I’m not a big fan of the Silver Age, where narrative ruled over dialogue. Basically, you learn who Deadman is.
GREEN LANTERN: Busiek/Quinones: One of my two favorites in this comic newspaper. I was a huge fan of NEW FRONTIER and this takes the same tonality and approach. Busiek does what he does best, telling the story from the vantage point of the little people instead of the hero.
METAMORPHO: Gaiman/Allred: My second favorite; I simply love good old deprecation. This was like a trip back to X-STATIX and JUSTICE LEAGUE EUROPE all rolled into one. METAMORPHO pays homage to the Silver Age while unmercifully mocking it. Misogyny and sexism abound; this was like a modern day sensitive metrosexual visiting AMC’s MAD MEN.
TEEN TITANS: Berganza/Galloway: I hate the DC “kid book” style of art, so I went into this one with a bad taste on first glance. However, Berganza takes a page from Johns’ portrayal of Lex Luthor, which I found interesting. Are the bad guys really bad or just misunderstood?
STRANGE ADVENTURES: Pope: I love Paul Pope, but I’ve never been a big ADAM STRANGE fan. Basically Ranagar gets attacked by space pirates.
SUPERGIRL: Palmiotti/Conner: OK, so Supergirl is back to being a cute kid instead of a role model for camwhores. Cool. She chases Krypto and her cat.
METAL MEN: Didio/Lopez/Nowlan: If the Metal Men have the mentality of children why didn’t Rex Hunter shrink them in stature? Because right now they come across as mongoloid adults. Rex takes the metal gang to a bank to learn how the banks will collapse in the next few years. A heist occurs, yet Rex holds the metalloids at bay, except gold…naughty, naughty gold.
WONDER WOMAN: Caldwell: Look, kids, Wonder Woman is now a 14 year old Japanese girl that drops acid before bed. I don’t know what was going on in this thing. The panels bleed together more than a suicidal hemophiliac and Wonder Woman floats while talking to some birds. Pass…
SGT. ROCK and EASY CO.: Kubert/Kubert: Nazis beat the piss out of old Sarge.
FLASH & IRIS WEST: Kerschel/Fletcher: Probably the most complete story of the collection, Grodd has Barry Allen by the short hairs chasing the electrical current of a bomb. After chasing to the supposed destination, Allen learns that Grodd pulled a fast one and is going after his girl Iris. Iris’ story is more of her whining that Barry is never there for her and the bitch leaves a note to end their marriage. Ahh, only in the 60s was divorce so void of emotion.
THE DEMON & CATWOMAN: Simonson/Stelfreeze: OK, my whole Silver Age theme theory is blown out of the water when Selina Kyle is casing the Demon’s house and she mentions how she Googled him. Boy, will she be in for a surprise in three weeks when we get to part 1 of 12 of the actual robbery.
HAWKMAN: Baker: I loved the POV on this one letting the story be told by one of the eagles under Hawkman’s control as they go after an airliner that has been hijacked.
One of the reasons I read comics is for the consequences and how they transcend throughout the entire universe. While each story had some palpable danger, with so many Silver and Golden Age nods to coincide with the delivery format, nothing really seems to matter in WEDNESDAY COMICS.
I had some fun with several of the vignettes, and perhaps in a “$2.00 - 10 pages a week” format I would be more enticed to stay with the more enjoyable stories. But in this format, with the hefty price tag I’ll just keep buying my regular comics on Wednesday...not WEDNESDAY COMICS. You know what? Even the fucking name is confusing. I’m done…
When Optimous Douche isn’t reading comics and misspelling the names of 80’s icons, he “transforms” into a corporate communications guru. "What if the whole world had superpowers? Find out in the pages of Optimous’ original book AVERAGE JOE. Read the first full issue on Optimous’ New Blog and see original sketches by fellow @$$hole Bottleimp. If you are a publisher or can help these guys get AVERAGE JOE up, up, and on the shelves in any way, drop Optimous a line."

OUTLAW TERRITORY VOLUME 1

Edited by Michael Woods Story and Art by Various Publisher: Image Comics A Review in Two Parts by Ambush Bug

The only way I can do this fantastic Old West tome is by going story by story and giving a brief rundown of each. To sum it all up, the book is one of the finest collections of stories Image Comics has ever produced, each story worthy of a full review and much praise. You can tell a lot of effort went into this book and there’s no way I’m going to do it justice in this review, but I’ll try. Due to the enormity of this book, originally, I wanted to cover all of the stories in one review, but it looks like I’ll have to split this review in two. Be sure to pop back next week to see what I thought of the @$$-half of this book. My thoughts on the first fifteen stories are below.
”Daniel 5:27” by Moritat: The thing that struck me the most about this tale of frontier justice was the art. A gritty cartoon is the best way of categorizing it, and although the it’s a simple story, the art makes it worth reading over and over just to digest the richly textured panels. I’ve never heard of Moritat before, but he’s an artist I’d like to see more of.
”Ballad of a Bad Man” by Joe Kelly & Max Fuimara: Joe Kelly serves a powerful tale of a child who pursues the killer of his parents. As unconventional and unpredictable as it gets, this one was. Max Fiumara is a name I’ve heard of before, but I’ve never seen art as rich as this. Part Wrightson and part Deodato, Fiumara makes this tragic tale resonate.
”Sundown” by Joshua Ortega & Trevor Goring: Another tale of vengeance, this time the morbid and gruesome bar is raised as a man with a gun tracks down some murderers. But an unseen killer pursues them all and rears its ugly head by the end of the story. Three stories in to this book and I’m noticing a trend: vengeance is the dish of the day. But the cool thing is that the variety of capable writers and artists in this book guarantees that even though the theme is similar, the final product is only similar in that it’s damn fine reading.
”Dispatch” by Shay & Dean Kotz: Hey, it’s not a tale of vengeance! Alright! “Dispatch” is a powerful story story, though, of a meeting between a young Union soldier who happens upon a wizened Confederate. The ending is bad for all parties except the reader, who has yet another treat to read.
”American Dream” by Jose El Torres & Jorge Molina Manzanero: This is the first story I’ve read that warrants and practically demands to become a miniseries at the very least. Jose El Torres and Jorge Molina Manzanero tell the tale of Ramon Vasquez de la Cruz, a Mexican bounty hunter who has a penchant for loving America and blowing shit up. Manzanero’s vibrant panels depict some delicious action. I love the panel as Ramon lets loose a single bullet from his gun that lands dead center of a bad guy’s skull. Damn fine comic bookin’ in “American Dream.” Best story so far.
”The First Car in Mexico” by Ivan Brandon & Andy MacDonald: Another tale that is charming in its simplicity; telling the tale of the death of Pancho Villa. Andy MacDonald’s art is fantastic here. In just a few panels, an entire scene is played out in slo mo. Another story that I’d love to read the chapters that went on prior to and after it. Very cinematic stuff.
”The Most Civilized Establishment From Ocean To Ocean” by James Patrick & Koi Pham: The term “kill ‘em with kindness” came to mind while reading this unusual tale of a pair of bank robbers who stumble upon the most pleasant town in all the West. Koi Pham delivers some exceptional work art-wise in this story with quite an original concept.
”Ahiga” by Christian Beranek & Koray Kuranel: Here’s another one I’d love to see elongated into a miniseries or an ongoing. “Ahiga” tells the tale of a Native American boy out for justice, and brutal justice at that. Koray Kuranel sure knows how to draw that blood splatter. This is a very nicely paced story by Christian Beranek about a character I’d love to read more of.
”Incident Over Thirty-Six Days in the Colorado Rockies” by Joshua Hale Fialkov & Christie Tseng: Joshua Hale Fialkov delivers another grim tale in the same vein as his ELK’S RUN series as an ailing bounty hunter presses through the elements to deliver a wanted man to justice. Haunting is the only word I can use to describe this one. As the calendar days pass by, a cloud of doom hovers over the pair of horsemen. This is a chilling tale, made more gripping by the beautiful art by Christie Tseng.
”Rio Chino” by Greg Pak & Ian Kim: More frontier justice and another memorable gunman makes his debut. A “Chinaman” comes across a slaughterhouse of Chinese bodies and a white man caught in the crossfire. Add one bigoted sheriff to the mix and you have the makings of a good old shootout--but the Chinese cowboy has a few tricks up his sleeve. Greg Pak delivers some potent action in this little yarn.
”One Man’s Land” by Stephen Reedy & Giorgos Gousis: Holy crap! This story was just wrong. Cows. Dogs. Wives. All are a target when two men start a feud over a spot of land. This is a gory, brutal mess of a masterpiece with an ending that I didn’t see coming. After reading so many somber and serious stories, the placement of “One Man’s Land” in this particular spot of this book is perfect. Loads of over the top action is here with a tongue firmly placed in cheek (although this wildman of a short story may bite off that tongue and spit it in your face).
”The Bounty Killers” by Steven Grant, Shannon Eric Denton & John Cboins: This was a fine piece of short fiction illustrated in an unconventional but fitting way. Reminiscent of a cross between AEON FLUX and a Plimptoon, artists Shannon Eric Denton and John Cboins bring Steven Grant’story of a man captured by bounty hunters to vivid life.
”He Will Set Your Fields On Fire” by Chris Moreno: Guaranteed, you won’t read another Western tale like this one. The less said about it the better, but it stars an old man, a song, and a monkey. This too cool for words story is made even cooler with the grimily drawn panels by the writer, Chris Moreno. Fun stuff. Did I mention it’s got a monkey in it?
”The Weaponsmith” by Fred Van Lente, Johnny Timmons & Danika Massey: Fred Van Lente shines the spotlight on a profession that doesn’t get much attention in “The Weaponsmith.” This is a tricky story that had me going right up until the shocking ending. Don’t want to spoil it, but it’s a damn fine O. Henry twist, and one you’ll remember due to the potent panels of Johnny Timmons and Danika Massey.
Finally, we have ”Nora” by M. Sean McManus & Michelle Silva: This is an ugly little tale of the oldest profession. For some reason, I couldn’t get KILL BILL out of my head while reading this one. Michelle Silva does a great job of mixing graphics with more typical art. The graphics make this one sing with rich tones and shades. This is one of those stories you may want to take a shower after reading, but if it causes that much of a visceral punch, it’s got to be prety darn good.
Whew, I need a break. See what I mean? This was a massive read. And some of the best Old West fiction you’re ever going to see collected in one volume. Can’t wait to chug through the rest of this one with you guys next week.
Ambush Bug is Mark L. Miller, reviewer and co-editor of AICN Comics for over eight years. Check out his short comic book fiction here and here published in MUSCLES & FIGHTS 3 and MUSCLES & FRIGHTS on his ComicSpace page. Bug was interviewed here and here at Cream City Comics. Look for more comics from Bug in 2009 from Bluewater Productions, including the just-announced sequel to THE TINGLER for their VINCENT PRICE PRESENTS series available in July’s previews (Order code: JUL09 0737) and on the shelves September 30th.

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN ANNUAL #36

Writer: Marc Guggenheim Art: Pat Oliffe Publisher: Marvel Comics Reviewer: Matt Adler

This annual has gotten a significant amount of hype, as it is the lead-in to the upcoming “Who Is Ben Reilly?” storyline that will run in the thrice-monthly AMAZING SPIDER-MAN. That, along with the forthcoming SPIDER-MAN: THE CLONE SAGA miniseries, represents the first time in more than 10 years that Marvel will directly address “The Clone Saga” in any major way (the always enjoyable SPIDER-GIRL series has never shied away from embracing all aspects of Spider-history, but it’s been off in its own corner of Marvel’s publishing line).
Now it seems Marvel is willing to bring the story back into the mainline (perhaps in concession to fans unhappy with the abandonment of continuity in “One More Day”?). This news has caused delight in some fans, and consternation in others; but to be honest, most of the voices of protest don’t seem to have read the original story and simply have a knee-jerk avoidance to it based on what they’ve “heard,” years after it was actually published. To be sure, corporate politics derailed the original saga (you can read more about this in my 3-part interview with former Marvel EIC Tom DeFalco, right here at AICN), but the fact remains that many of the plot elements and characters were developed by talented writers, and there’s no reason other talented writers can’t reach in, pick out the gems, and put a polish on them to use in a new story.
That appears to be what Marc Guggenheim is doing here. The “Clone Saga” elements in this initial story are limited, but still significant. Without spoiling too much, the setup appears to be that Ben Reilly, the clone of Peter Parker, did something Very Bad “several years ago” (in Marvel Time; in real time, Ben has been dead for over 10 years). Of course, readers of the original “Clone Saga” know that things are not always as they seem when it comes to clones, since false accusations often abound when you’re dealing with physical duplicates. Plus, Ben has always been shown to be every bit the hero that Peter Parker is, essentially having had the same loving and moral upbringing, so it’s a good bet we’re dealing with some degree of misdirection here.
Still, the mystery is set up very effectively, from the opening flashback to Peter’s stunned reaction at the news that the man he once called brother may have committed heinous acts. Adding to the effectiveness of this sequence is the presence of longtime SPIDER-GIRL and UNTOLD TALES OF SPIDER-MAN artist, Pat Oliffe. If there’s anyone who can balance the needs of a modern Spider-Man story with a connection to tales past, it’s him. There’s also a nice montage with images of Ben Reilly from the original ‘70s clone story as well as the ‘90s saga, featuring the art of Dan Jurgens, John Romita Jr., Mark Bagley, and more.
The rest of the story deals with the engagement party of Aunt May and J. Jonah Jameson’s father. Yes, Aunt May has been set up with yet another improbable suitor, following in the line of such ill-fated matches as Doctor Octopus, Nathan Lubensky, Willie Lumpkin, and the Avengers’ butler, Edwin Jarvis. But here’s a question: assuming this relationship does work out, and they follow through on getting married and settling down, doesn’t that remove Aunt May’s entire purpose for being in the series? For years, she’s been the living legacy of Peter’s bad decision with the burglar; his frail, widowed Aunt, living all alone, with only Peter to count on. If they go through with this, that’s all gone. Something to ponder.
In any event, Guggenheim gets in some nice jokes about how Peter and his longtime nemesis/boss Jameson would practically be brothers after the wedding, a thought which appeals to neither of them, though Peter has some fun with it at JJJ’s expense. There’s also an interesting surprise as we’re introduced to the members of May’s family, the Reillys, whom she apparently hasn’t seen in years. One flaw here is that no effort is made to explain WHY we haven’t seen them; it might make sense if May had some kind of falling out with them, but there’s no indication of that here.
By the way, if you’re wondering what the Reillys’ connection to Ben Reilly is, it’s pretty simple; once he realized he was a clone of Peter Parker, he adopted his uncle’s first name and his aunt’s maiden name to distinguish himself. Peter would later claim that Ben was a “cousin” when his friends encountered a now dyed-blond Ben (yeah, yeah, if Clark Kent can get away with glasses, Ben can get away with blond hair). Now, it seems more than mere coincidence that they would reintroduce Ben Reilly AND May’s extended family in the same issue, but whether there’s any more significance to the Reilly connection remains to be seen.
Revisiting “The Clone Saga” will be tricky, given how much has changed continuity-wise in the intervening years. It would be simple for the writers to just ignore everything that took place and simply use a character with the name Ben Reilly to lure in fans, but this issue sends all the right signals that they’re serious about taking what’s been established and making it work in modern continuity. All in all, this is a pretty promising start for a storyline that looks to reopen one of the most controversial chapters in Spider-Man history.
In most places, Matt Adler goes by the name his mother gave him, but occasionally uses the handle "CylverSaber", based on a character he created for the old DARK FORCES II: JEDI KNIGHT game (one telling hint of his overweening nerddom). He currently does IT and networking support for the government of Nassau County, NY, but his dream is to write for a living, and is in the process of figuring out how to get publishers to give his stuff a look. In the meantime, he passes the time by writing for AICN, CBR, and a few other places. He also formerly wrote for MARVEL SPOTLIGHT magazine.

THE NOBODY HC OGN

Writer/Artist: Jeff Lemire Publisher: Vertigo/DC Comics Reviewed by Humphrey Lee

One of the great joys, and biggest horrors methinks, is when it comes to seeing one of your favorite lesser known, well, whatevers (writers, bands, artists, etc) start to get more and more attention. Selfish to admit, and come on, we all know we do this, but you start to feel a little less "special" that this cool little thing you enjoyed is now going to start getting more and more attention and now there's more people that know about it, but they haven't known about it as long as you have so they start to annoy you, right? And then you start to panic: "well, what if they made their style more mainstream now? What if all these goons are moving in because all the artistic merit is gone?" and you start to weep and get anxious over the tattoo you got in dedication to them after about sixteen more whiskeys than you should have had and because you secretly thought it might get you a girl with similar tastes...okay, moving on. So here, with THE NOBODY, we have Jeff Lemire, of the fantastic series of ESSEX COUNTY graphic novels fame, getting his mainstream(ish) debut via Vertigo. Did he keep his indie cred or did he Metallica (or "Selloutica") it?
Nah, dude totally rocked it Radiohead style. Except I couldn't decide to pay only a fiver for this, not that I would have because this was well worth for full Andrew Jackson. Really, that whole intro was just my posturing on the other side of the "hype machine". The anti-hype if you will when anything or anybody is moving up in exposure on their own. Just like those aforementioned ESSEX COUNTY books, THE NOBODY continues in the same tradition of Lemire's focus on the proverbial small town, but this time with a sci-fi twist as the main character involved is none other than H.G. Wells' Invisible Man, thanks to the beauty that is public domain. Basically, the gist is that Griffen, our see-through male, takes himself to the relative middle of nowhere in order to work on his condition, thinking the lack of people will keep prying eyes away from him as he works, and that some questionable types from his haunted past will be unable to find him. As you can imagine, pretty much none of these concepts remain true and, as they say, hijinks ensue.
What goes on from there is an exhibition in what we've seen Lemire weave so well before, as you have the residents slowly become more and more paranoid about the stranger in their midst despite having almost no hands on experiences with him except for the occasional food run or what have you, and those are always on the courteous side. But, of course, everyone's internal busybody takes over and the town's opinion of him starts to descend, especially with egging on from a very vocal local that didn't much take to him from the start. If anything, things do kind of escalate like clockwork, but Lemire does very well to give the little nudges here and there before the town becomes very active about the outsider. All the while, there's other elements being kicked around, like Griffen's befriending of a local teenage girl, Vickie, who is also a bit of a solitary figure since her mom left her and her father, and then there's the occasional good old fashioned head psychosis on the part of our central character, always good for a laugh and a "WTF?" of course.
If there's any glaring flaw that I would put on this work, it’s that it does kind of play out a little too safe I guess is the way to go. All the elements in play are well handled and there's typically at least the minimal amount of play you would like on some of them like the little flashes in to Griffen's past and so on (though I'd argue some of the insights and relationships could have gotten another page or two each for fleshing out); the acts kind of play out exactly as you'd expect them to and hit the rise and fall somewhat predictably. But even slight convention can be saved by craft, which is why I've come to enjoy Lemire's work so much, and THE NOBODY is no different. It might not move into “groundbreaking” territory as much as I would hope, but it sets up residence in "Just Fucking Good Comics"ville just fine. At the very least, it seems to be a refinement of his work, especially in the penciling part of his storytelling, as his lines have tightened up rather significantly. It's still a somewhat raw cartooning style, with the figures still a little rough around the edges, but they're much more honed methinks overall, giving their expressions that much more depth.
So, yes, of course it's disappointing that my indie creator didn't create something that "redefined the medium" or whatever unfair expectations I was putting on this book for no discernible reason besides my respect for his work and the Vertigo Imprint itself. How dare they and all that rabble. Now all I'm left with is an expertly crafted tale, one with some great character exploration, pacing and plotting, with an aesthetic all its own. And that is a perfect lazy day read. And that is highly rereadable and a great showcase for a talent on the rise. I guess somebody isn't a Nobody anymore.
Humphrey Lee has been an avid comic book reader going on fifteen years now and a contributor to Ain't It Cool comics for quite a few as well. In fact, reading comics is about all he does in his free time and where all the money from his day job wages goes to - funding his comic book habit so he can talk about them to you, our loyal readers (lucky you). He's a bit of a social networking whore, so you can find him all over the Interwebs on sites like Twitter, The MySpaces, Facebookand a Blogger Account where he also mostly talks about comics with his free time because he hasn't the slightest semblance of a life. Sad but true, and he gladly encourages you to add, read, and comment as you will.

HOWARD CHAYKIN’S AMERICAN FLAGG: DEFINITIVE COLLECTION VOLUMES 1 & 2

Dynamite Entertainment (US) / Titan Books (UK) Reviewed by: Ryan McLelland My favorite comic growing up in the eighties was THE SHADOW (sorry PETER PORKER - you are a very close second). Howard Chaykin's Shadow was a breath of fresh air to me and I gobbled up every frame of that miniseries. Chaykin didn't go onto the regular series when it launched, leaving me to look around for other comics Chaykin had done.
I didn't have to look very far. I found AMERICAN FLAGG and was instantly launched into gun violence and big ol' jubblies from page one. Taking place in our now not-so-distant-future (2031), Rueben Flagg is a former actor turned 'supercop' when he joins up with The Plex. The world has gone to hell and the Plex is part of the solution to get American back on track. Of course that's a lot of bull and Flagg instantly sees the rampant corruption spew forth in the organization while the public is forced to watch horribly violent reality television shows with subliminal messages attached.
Basically, it's a lot like our world today.
Dynamite and Titan have done an amazing job bringing these collections together. The first volume collects issues 1-6 (with a "rarely seen" prologue included) while the second collects 7-14 with a BRAND NEW story by Chaykin. The new story is the icing on the cake - it's 12 pages of amazing glory. Chaykin has surely upped his game since the eighties and the legend has never looked better then his new story does here.
Can't take away from the rest of the graphic novel(s), though. Littered with sketches and pin-ups, these volumes are wonderful reprints of the original series. The colors stand up nicely and are reprinted on very heavy paper. The story, which may have been a bit over the top in the early eighties, really rings true in today's modern culture. Chaykin, like all great writers, was not just writing a story but actually predicting the future.
THE DEFINITIVE COLLECTION is a must buy - not just for fans of Flagg or Chaykin. AMERICAN FLAGG is a classic American comic book that helped redefine independent comics in the eighties and still continues to shove it right in your face today.
Ryan McLelland has worked in movies and comics journalism for the past several years before joining the @$$holes here at AICN. Ryan’s comic work has already graced comic shelves with Arcana’s PHILLY, WISE INTELLIGENCE, UPTOWN GIRL, and THE SENTINELS ANTHOLOGY. He rarely updates his blog but when he does it can be read at www.eyewannabe.com. The first issue of his new WISE INTELLIGENCE miniseries can be found here.

TORCHWOOD: RIFT WAR

Story by: Simon Furman, Paul Grist, Ian Edginton, Brian Williamson Art by: Paul Grist, SL Gallant, D’Israeli, Brian Williamson Published by: Titan Books Reviewed by: Baytor

For two years now, TORCHWOOD has been the less interesting sister-program of DOCTOR WHO. It’s not bad exactly, but it lacks the purity of formula that has allowed the Doctor to cross generations. And, of course, it gets its own magazine (which I think is required by law of all science fiction shows), which publishes a 10-page comic story every issue. This is the less than stellar collection of their first major story-line: RIFT WAR.
Much of this volume is illustrated by Paul Grist of JACK STAFF fame. To say that he fails to capture the likenesses of the TORCHWOOD cast would be the understatement of the century. He is, however, the only artist of the four that can make each character instantly recognizable without resorting the worst sort of photo-referencing and it ends up being a shame that its not his artwork throughout.
Storywise, the whole thing is a mess. It starts off with the Harrowkind (who look vaguely Scottish, but without the fashion sense) invading Cardiff and making off with Torchwood HQ, along with resident Asian cutie Toshiko, where she meets the mysterious alien, Vox. After helping her get back, he begins acting in a strange manner that instantly foreshadows the obvious future plot developments. Along the way, we get a lot of one-shot adventures where they have to raise giant babies, battle genetically engineered dinosaurs, and team up with the 1918 version of the team to stop bad guys at Stonehenge, before the plot twist absolutely everyone will see coming finally happens.
I know I’m being overly harsh on the book. It’s not dreadful and it’s perfectly readable (apart from the times where you can’t tell the Welsh girl apart from the Japanese girl), but it always drives me a little nuts to see a strip like this take on extended story arcs, instead of focusing on shorter stories. The magazine only has 10 pages a month to tell their stories and telling a 10-part epic story just highlights how clunky the format is for longer stories… especially when you have trouble keeping an artist or writer for more than three installments.
I ended up enjoying the one-part “Jetsam” story more than the main story, despite some of the most lifeless photo-referenced work I’ve ever seen. The Torchwood crew discovers an advanced piece of alien hardware, which is accidentally bonded with Tosh and she becomes embroiled in an ancient conflict. It is by no means a great story, but it at least takes better advantage of the format than its 10-part bookmate.

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE WORLD OF TOMORROW? OGN

Written and drawn by Brian Fies Published by Abrams ComicArts Reviewed by Stones Throw

There’s a great Robert Crumb cartoon that follows one patch of land in a series of panels from pre-colonisation up to the present day, showing us houses getting built, roads and automobiles appearing, telephone wires and telegraph poles cropping up and beginning to crowd the panel. The last panel is captioned something like, “What will happen next?” Brian Fies is asking a similar question in this new graphic novel. The basic premise is that, beginning with the New York World’s Fair in 1939, it traces the history of technological development and exploration in the twentieth century through the Second World War, the Cold War, the Moon landings, finally asking the poignant titular question, Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow?
Communicating our collective loss of hope and optimism are two characters, “Pop” and “Buddy”, who, in an intended commentary on comic book chronologies, age veeryy slloowwlyy over the decade-long intervals in which the book unfolds. Meanwhile, as a foil to the main plotline, each chapter is followed by a pastiche of comic books of the day, neatly printed on different paper stock, beginning with a Golden Age adventure given away free at the World’s Fair, all the way up to a late-Sixties Denny O’Neill style story in which a conscience-stricken Captain Crater walks away from his space-faring identity.
Seems like a fair idea and a clever structure to shape it around. Fies is probably right that, as a whole, we’ve lost imagination both in comic books and the scientific world that inspired them (though I would venture to say that’s more of a result of having done it in the first place--once man has got to the Moon there’s not a lot further he can go.) Unfortunately I found his book lacking in the same qualities of imagination and ambition that he’s wishing we still had.
The first problem is the art. Fies won an Eisner award for his dot.comic MOM’S CANCER in 2005. This book probably demonstrates the problems in stepping up from the web to published works. His art has a bold and expressive cartoony style that probably works great when reading it online but is wholly lacking in more subtle detail and depth, leaving the many splash pages looking pretty empty. More importantly, the simplistic cartooning means each era, from 1940s to 1970s, looks pretty much the same, so, unlike the Crumb cartoon, we don’t get to see that kind of visual progression and accumulation I’d have thought integral to the book. While numerous chunks of text tell us about the amazing technological progress over the years, the book isn’t able to express that facet of the story through images.
Weirdly, it seems Fies isn’t even trying to do that. Not only does he draw in such a simplistic style but locations are often backgrounded in a monochrome palette while only Pop and Buddy, the only two characters with dialogue for almost the whole book, get fully colored. The decision to have the archetypal father and son hardly age until the final chapter, set in the future, means we don’t even get to see much character development. “Buddy”’s eternal one-note is upbeat, with a brief key change to moody teen in the middle. Pop remains stoic and paternal but we don’t get to see him age and become an old man in a rapidly-changing world. How would a WWII veteran react to the atom bomb or Apollo 11? And for that matter, where the heck is the mother? Fies doesn’t say.
Pop and Buddy are evidently intended to represent all of us, which is why they’re also present as Captain Crater and Cosmic Kid. But the focus on two very generic characters limits the book and sticks it in limbo just as much as the Silver Age comic books it references, where it should be aiming for a sense of change and propulsion, even if that is curtailed, as Fies suggests. The meat of the book is wordy, heavily researched captions like:
“Shockley, Brattain, and Bardeen invented the semiconducting transistor in 1947. Their breakthrough amplified electrical signals, provided the on/off binary switching at the heart of every computer, and replaced the larger, hotter, more expensive, and less reliable vacuum tube.”
Or:
“From the days of the earliest vacuum-tube calculators and war-time code breakers through to transistors and integrated circuits, the speed and power of electronics soared while their size and price plummeted.”
Yeah, I skimmed over them, too. But given the absence of well-rounded characters and over-reliance on expository, factual captions, what do you have left? A pretty tired chronology from hope in 1939 to uncertainty circa Watergate and Viet Nam, with a saccharine “reach for the stars” conclusion tacked on the end, that’s what.
There were two scenes that I found of greater interest. The first, which recalled WATCHMEN, showed the kid working on a model rocket ship in his room on VJ Day as President Truman announces Japan’s unconditional surrender. The second was perhaps a little cliché but powerful nonetheless as, in 1955, Pop and Buddy work on a bomb shelter in their basement, neither calling any attention to what it is. What’s Fies saying with these two sequences? That scientific progress isn’t always beneficial? That the dream of the World’s Fair in 1939 has become corrupted? You wouldn’t get any sense of it from the conclusion, which blandly asserts we should all “build the world of tomorrow”.
In the end, I felt the book struck an unsatisfactory balance between scientific history and personal story, achieving success in neither. The title, like Neil Gaiman’s “Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?”, references Alan Moore’s Superman farewell, WHATEVER HAPPENED TO THE MAN OF TOMORROW?, and, while it might be an unfair comparison, that book was a better examination of national loss of innocence through the archetype of Superman. And WATCHMEN dealt more intelligently and honestly with nuclear paranoia and science in comic books.

THE WAKING Limited Series advance review!

Writer: Raven Gregory Artist: Vic Drujiniu (Soon to be) Published by: Zenescope Entertainment Advance review by: BottleImp

One of the best things that comic books have going for them today is the sheer diversity of subject matter. Sure, superheroes still dominate the market, but other genres now have a much healthier representation on the racks than ever would have been possible in decades past. Science Fiction, Western, Biographical, Humor, Mystery/Thriller, Crime, Horror—you get the picture. I was fortunate enough to be able to see a preview of an upcoming limited series that combines the latter two genres—Crime and Horror—in Zenoscope’s THE WAKING.
In a nutshell, we have CSI meets NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD. THE WAKING follows four police officers as they discover that the victims of their latest cases are beginning to get up, walk around, and hunt down those responsible for their deaths. Meanwhile there’s a mysterious stranger who seems to be linked to the bizarre re-animations. Is he the cause of the zombies, or does he hold the key to putting an end to them? Well, I only got to see the lettered and penciled pages of the first three issues, so I have no idea how it all ends. But this series has a hell of a good start.
Although I mentioned NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD, the only characteristic that THE WAKING shares with Romero’s work is that both have corpses walking around when they should be lying in graves like respectable worm-farms. Whereas NIGHT’s zombies were brainless, aimless, shuffling flesh-eating automatons, WAKING’s zombies are more directed, like the zombie legends of old when the undead were raised for specific tasks. These corpses have a purpose: revenge. I’m glad that Gregory came up with something new to do with the zombie genre rather than the typical “band of strangers join together to survive” kind of story that has become the go-to when it comes to a living dead kinda storyline. What with Marvel’s seemingly endless parade of zombie books, Kirkman’s WALKING DEAD and a slew of other horror books that are cluttering the racks, it’s refreshing to see a slightly skewed premise of vengeance from beyond the grave to set this book apart.
Drujiniu’s art goes a long way towards blending the horror elements with the real-world, police investigation aspect of the series. Prudes beware, however—there are several lovingly-rendered drawings of nude women with large, shapely breasts found within these pages. They are so lovingly rendered, in fact, that they threaten to push THE WAKING into the realm of being a titty book—except for the fact that Drujiniu renders EVERYTHING with just as much painstaking, loving detail, whether it be a set of Double-Ds, the interior of a police cruiser, or a maggot-encrusted corpse beating the shit out of the owner of said Double-Ds. The top-notch visuals enhance both the sense of the concrete, true-to-life environments and thrill of watching a late-night horror flick on Skinemax.
I only have one nit to pick with the series so far, and it’s a problem that seems to be characteristic of the crime genre whether represented in print or on film or television. Gregory’s four officers, though distinct visually and given different voices, still feel sketched rather than realized. Like I said, it’s a problem that I’ve noticed with a lot of mysteries, when the bulk of importance is naturally given to the plot rather than the personalities of the cast. After all, it’s the story, the mystery that’s really going to be the hook that draws people in; it’s those dangling clues that make the reader (or viewer) want to stay ‘til the end to find out what happens. And so it is with THE WAKING—I would like it if the cops were a little more fully realized, but in the end I wholeheartedly admit that the real meat of the series is finding out why those pesky bodies won’t stay deceased.
All in all, THE WAKING looks to be a fun read—look for it to crawl onto the comic racks within the next few months.
When released from his Bottle, the Imp takes the form of Stephen Andrade, an artist/illustrator/pirate monkey painter from the Northeast. You can see some of his artwork here. He’s given up comics more times than he can remember. But every time he thinks he's out, they pull him back in.

THE COMPLEAT NEXT MEN VOL. 1

Written and Illustrated by: John Byrne Published by: IDW Publishing Reviewed by: superhero

John Byrne gets a bad rap. Okay, sure, he’s said some pretty boneheaded things in the past and his art style may seem to be a bit dated but I stand by that statement. I think Byrne gets a bad rap.
I expected to be disappointed with this book. I actually have all of the original issues. I bought and read JOHN BYRNE’S NEXT MEN when they originally came out in the early to mid 90’s. I remember really enjoying the series back then. I also remember feeling that it was Byrne’s last hurrah. After NEXT MEN I felt my appreciation for Byrne’s artwork diminish. Actually, I think it was during the NEXT MEN where I began to see the cracks in Byrne’s armor. Up until then Byrne could do no wrong. He was pretty much infallible to me in my teens and early twenties. But after a while I started growing up a bit, discovering new and different types of comics and art styles, and I soon found out that the luster of the “Byrne style” had worn off and several years ago I just about out and out had a hard time buying anything he’d attached his name to, not just because of his art but because of his writing. To me, somewhere around the mid-nineties was where Byrne’s needle got stuck on the record of his own ego and refused to move…so I moved on away from him. Off to discover newer pastures.
Which is why I found this volume so refreshing. Again, I thought I was going to be disappointed by this volume. It’s hard revisiting old comic work that you enjoyed when you were younger. Flaws that weren’t evident on that first, naïve read become glaring and jarring to older, more jaded eyes. That wasn’t the case with my re-read of JBNM. If anything this re-visit to Byrne-land re-ignited my appreciation for Byrne as a strong visual storyteller and a powerful cartoonist. This particular volume presents the beginning of the NEXT MEN saga in pure black and white leaving Byrne’s artwork untouched by a color palette and it’s a powerful sight. Byrne’s artwork in pure black and white is striking on the page. It’s almost as if the lack of color adds strength to Byrne’s style. But what’s most impressive here is Byrne’s storytelling ability. NEXT MEN was very atypical for the comic books of its time. While it is a take on the superhero/sci-fi genre it’s very different from what other books were doing at the time. See, for the most part, there’s not a lot of action. It’s very much an early precursor to what Bendis and co. have made superhero books into today, which is more talky talk than action. But what Byrne succeeds in with this book is making a story that is mostly dialog and character interaction far more entertaining than one would expect it to be. NEXT MEN is a compelling and interesting read from start to finish and it’s a great display of what I’m realizing in my later years was Byrne’s real strength: storytelling.
Now before I get carried away let me just say that it’s also full of many of Byrne’s weaknesses. Stuff like re-using old plot devices from other stories (a segment during the Russian story arc lifts directly from Byrne’s STARBRAND run), dialog that is a bit too corny to take seriously, and some slightly rushed looking artwork. But the thing is…Byrne did this book all on his own. He wrote, penciled, and inked the whole thing by himself. How many comic creators do you know that could do that today and get their book out on time month to month? Not many. So I’m willing to forgive a couple of missteps here and there and accept NEXT MEN for a slightly flawed but highly enjoyable read. I’ll be getting the next volume ASAP. Hell, I may even buy the oversized hardcovers. I liked it that much.
Discovered as a babe in an abandoned comic book storage box and bitten by a radioactive comic fan when he was a teenager, superhero is actually not-so mild mannered sometime designer & cartoonist, Kristian Horn of Los Angeles, California. He's been an @$$hole for three years. Some of his work can be seen at www.kristianhorn.com.

THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY #1

Writer: Chuck Dixon Art: Esteve Polls Publisher: Dynamite Entertainment Reviewer: Mr. Pasty

Thanks to Dynamite Entertainment, Sergio Leone’s THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY has found its way onto the pages of a comic book. And since everyone on this side of the culture warp has already seen what is largely considered THE GODFATHER of Spaghetti Westerns, Dynamite has attempted a reimagining of the Leone Universe. Folks, this is one creative license that needs to be revoked.
When I was 18, I had a friend throw up in my car after a hard night of drinking. Unfortunately he vomited on my copy of SWAMP THING #121. I tried to read it a few days later, but the pages were a kaleidoscope of ugly colors and it just flat out reeked of bile. Defeated, I threw the book out and called it a loss. Reading THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY has reminded me of that incident.
This is not Dynamite’s first foray into Leone’s beloved westerns. A few weeks ago I reviewed THE MAN WITH NO NAME because it also focused on the exploits of Blondie and Tuco. I immediately noticed that both books have a lot in common. Kind of like the way each one left me with the facial expression of a Nazi staring into the Ark of the Covenant.
The most frustrating part of this book is that there is no singular egregious sin that makes me want to throw my arms up in disgust. Looking back, I kind of wish there was; maybe it could give have given this book a little life. Nothing happens here. And when it does, it’s either predictable (to the point of absurdity) or it just makes no sense. For instance, the book opens with dark, moody panels and then OH MY GOD IT’S A TRAIN HEIST! IN THE WILD WEST! The train heist has become the accidental kick to the groin in “America’s Funniest Home Videos.” You know why it’s there – and you also know you deserve better.
People get shot dead in this story every time they do something wrong. Yet when Blondie tries to wax one of the main antagonists and fails, they simply beat the shit out of him and steal his horse. Why? Because if they killed him, there would be no issue #2. This is not storytelling. This is painting by numbers. I get the sense that the people behind this book really think they’re achieving, but their adherence to the standards set by Leone has failed them. The brilliance of the original film does not transition well to the pages of comic books, where a reader cannot hear foreboding music or the sound of far-away gunshots. Nor can they filter out the personality of the main character, who often has little to no dialogue – especially within illustrations so dark and clumsily drawn as these.
I’m sure there was a day when someone was reading a comic book and THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY came on TV. It must have been like the time that guy with the chocolate ran into the guy with the peanut butter. Unfortunately this is not Reeces, this is feces. I don’t know if this series will ever work, because Dynamite has assembled a story around the franchise and not the other way around. That leaves me with the impression that it’s not about the comic, it’s about the money. It always is, I suppose – even in the book. About midway through the story, a prostitute offers to fuck someone for two dollars. That’s not a bad deal. THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY fucked me and I had to pay $3.50.
Final word: Angel Eyes would have put a pillow over this book and shot it in the face.
Web heads who can’t get enough of Mr. Pasty’s word vomit are encouraged to see him operate as Nostradumbass over at MMAmania.com. Love, hate and Mafia Wars requests should be directed here.

BATTLEFIELDS VOL. 1: THE NIGHT WITCHES

Story by: Garth Ennis Art by: Russ Braun Published by: Dynamite Entertainment Reviewed by: Baytor

There is no one in comics today who does better war stories than Garth Ennis. I don’t care how you feel about his super-hero comics, his ultra-violence, or his tendency for inappropriate humor. He flat-out does not have an equal when it comes to war comics. You have to go back to the 50s and Harvey Kurtzman, who is the undisputed champ of war story shorts, to find a proper challenger.
I think the most important aspect of a war comic is empathy. You don’t have to agree with the war or the country fighting it, but you have to be able to put yourself in the place of the common soldier who is expected to travel to distant lands and submit himself to the horrors of combat. You have to be able to capture the quiet moments, the rowdy moments, and the terrifying moments. Garth Ennis can do all of things effortlessly.
Which is not to say you have to like all soldiers. They’re people, not wind-up heroes that we take out to idolize on Memorial Day. The incompetent at the Dunkin’ Donuts that can’t get your coffee order right will probably be no better if you put a gun in his hand, nor will the petty tyrant of a boss if he actually gets his hands on the power of life and death. But a good war story has to understand such people and empathize with them more often than not, even if that person isn’t the most pleasant of people.
THE NIGHT WITCHES tells the story of a remarkable bit of nearly forgotten history, when Russian female pilots took to the air in obsolete bi-planes against the invading Germans. Even more remarkable is the pilots had to turn off their engines during attacks (to avoid giving away their position in the slow-moving planes) and hope they’d start back up after they dropped their bombs. In lesser hands, this would either have been an inspirational story of how female pilots are the equal of their male counterparts or a condemnation of the horrendous sexual harassment they received at the hands of men. Ennis takes all of that as a matter of fact and makes it about the people.
When they first arrive, the women are treated as a novelty act and the men are more interested in the size of their tits than their skill as pilots, and the commander’s reaction to finding out that our heroine, Anna Kharkova, needs to sit on a cushion to see out of the plane is priceless. But they soon prove their worth and are, more or less, accepted.
Running parallel to this story is the tale of a kind-hearted German soldier resisting the teaching of his monstrous commander. Early on, this is a distraction from the far more interesting Russian story, but it’s empathy that salvages it. As the story progresses, we discover that the monstrous commander is, in his own sick, twisted way, trying to save the lives of his charges by purging them of whatever warm fuzzy feelings they may have toward the Russian people, who most certainly do not return such feelings. By the time the two stories merge, the importance of setting up these characters becomes clear and makes the conclusion fairly surprising.
NIGHT WITCHES isn’t quite as satisfying as the suite of war stories Ennis published through Vertigo a few years back, but mostly because you can feel the repetition creeping into the formula. A failing of war stories is that they’re variations on a theme and fresh perspectives are few and far between, but Ennis’ talent at characterization and his ability to find less-traveled venues serves him well.

YOKAI DOCTOR VOL.1

By Yuki Sato Released by Del Ray Reviewer: Scott Green

I recently half-joked on twitter a speculation positing: now that ghosts of the J-Horror variety (RING, GRUDGE) are buried, zombies have run their course and vampires are in the midst of resurgence in popularity, yokai are on deck to be the next it supernatur

Readers Talkback

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  • July 15, 2009, 8:14 a.m. CST

    FIRST!!

    by Tell_Your_Mom_I_Said_Hi

    Comics r cool.

  • July 15, 2009, 8:15 a.m. CST

    Rob LIefeld fails at anatomy

    by Tell_Your_Mom_I_Said_Hi

    And proportions. And he's infamous for being a douche. Yay!

  • July 15, 2009, 8:22 a.m. CST

    When did American Flagg come out originally?

    by Righteous Brother

    what was it 85?, 86? What ana amazing time for comics, I was buying Alan Moore's Swamp Thing,(borrowing Watchmen from a friend), reading Frank Millers Born Again saga in Daredevil - as well as Batman Year One - remember when Frank Miller was good? Even a bunch of Marvel's regular titles were great back then,

  • July 15, 2009, 8:24 a.m. CST

    THE NOBODY review...funny...

    by FlickaPoo

    ...I never did get that tattoo for that very reason. Even avoided stickers on my beat up mule of a car...just in case...

  • July 15, 2009, 8:29 a.m. CST

    wednesday comics...

    by nerfherder111

    definitely not worth the price, but i didnt hate on it as much as u did, douche. damn is that art purdy. <br>really, the book is all about the art, which makes reading it annoying as most of us are by now used to story dominating their mainstream funny books. the art saves it for me tho, i just love the look of this thing. and it only looks cooler with the benjamin franklin rolling paper stock (just look at that half-page iris allen comic and tell me the paper isnt perfect for it)

  • July 15, 2009, 8:31 a.m. CST

    American Flagg

    by Laserhead

    originally started in 1983, and its golden years were basically the first three or four, though it existed in various incarnations through 1989. The 80s were like Howard Chaykin's Beatrice-- the shallowness, greed and corporate pop culture inspired his best work.<p>A major influence on Miller's DKR (The whole "television screen talking heads deliver narrative" was swiped from Flagg. In fact, I think the whole "pages of talking heads delivering narrative" is attributable to Chaykin, which makes him a huge influence on Bendis too. For sheer density of narrative, with more packed onto a single page than most modern comics have in a single issue, you can't beat Flagg! Way, way ahead of its time and pretty prescient in its futurism.

  • July 15, 2009, 8:34 a.m. CST

    Where the F^^k is Scalped!

    by StarchildAD

    It feels like a year since the last issue came out.

  • July 15, 2009, 8:35 a.m. CST

    You know, when the Flagg harcover first came out

    by Laserhead

    I tried and tried to get somebody here to discuss it, and there were no takers. Glad to see its still gaining fans.

  • July 15, 2009, 8:37 a.m. CST

    Hey, is the Shatterstar line

    by Laserhead

    a gay joke? Well done.

  • July 15, 2009, 8:40 a.m. CST

    Wednesday Comics

    by TDavis

    I'm giving this a chance. I love the fact that by its very size and format it's pretty much saying "HA! Try and get CGC to put ME in a plastic box!" Also, in the Metal Men segment of the review, who the Hell is Rex Hunter?

  • July 15, 2009, 8:43 a.m. CST

    Bug, I love ya man, but you really lowballed Green Lantern...

    by The Nihilist

    ...that was John's best issue so far! As is his wont, he took an obscure silver age villain and made him fascinating (and terrifying!). The necrophilia, the pet abuse, the ENDING. I think The Joker has a contendor for Creepiest Villain In The DCU.

  • July 15, 2009, 8:45 a.m. CST

    Correction on Wednesday Comics

    by optimous_douche

    Sorry folks I incorrectly named the creator of the Metal Men.<p? This is what happens when I read the rest of my books before writingmy reviews.<p> Rex Hunter, the son of Booster Gold did not create the Metal Men. Appologies....

  • July 15, 2009, 8:49 a.m. CST

    Wednesday Comics

    by ThusSpakeSpymunk

    As a lifelong KAMANDI fan, I'm getting Wednesday comics. I love the PRINCE VALIANT feel to it. But, at the same time, the rest of the material was pretty unengaging to me, with the possible exception of the eagle-POV HAWKMAN story. And I totally agree w/you on GREEN LANTERN. I loan my comics to my 8yo nephew, and he's been looking forward to BLACKEST NIGHT from all he's read so far - but he ain't getting that issue, with its necrophilia and suicide.

  • July 15, 2009, 8:54 a.m. CST

    Flagg still ahead of its time

    by Star Hump

    Considering the ongoing state of piss-poor writing in comics today. Flagg had a brilliant plots and crackling dialogue. It was unlike anything on the stands. Chaykin is a mastermind.

  • July 15, 2009, 8:58 a.m. CST

    Laserhead, you are correct.

    by Squashua

    It is. Also the pink background.<br><br> I considered throwing in a thought balloon stating, "Hey, where are my feet?", but felt it was a bit much.

  • July 15, 2009, 9:03 a.m. CST

    Laser/Flagg

    by steverodgers

    Laser I read my brothers issues as a kid, and I think tons of it must have gone right over my head. However I remember loving Raul the talking cat with the metal fingers. Was he as cool as I thought? We also got a huge stack of comics from a relative, that included a Black Kiss run, which I read, and I think had me walking around for a week in a horrified daze.

  • July 15, 2009, 9:13 a.m. CST

    Flagg TPBs

    by hst666

    Do these comprise the same issues as came out in the HC a year or two back? I don't have mine on me at the moment. I've been waiting for a follow-up. Don't want to switch to trades if I don't have to.

  • July 15, 2009, 9:19 a.m. CST

    by slutpunch

    i dug wednesday comics but yeah 15 pages for $4 is alot for a baby book. I can get a happy meal for less...but why does a squirrel have mascara on? its the ICE AGE

  • July 15, 2009, 9:19 a.m. CST

    INCARNATE #1

    by Series7

    Yeah more radical stuff. Hopefully they stopped the 4 different covers for everything though.

  • July 15, 2009, 9:20 a.m. CST

    scalped needs some love here

    by nechyv

    get on the rez bitches

  • July 15, 2009, 9:22 a.m. CST

    Raul is indeed as cool as you thought

    by Laserhead

    I read Flagg when I was 9-12, and most of it went ENTIRELY over my head; but I still had this sense that I was experiencing something unique, and it was always entertaining. But the main reason a 9-year old reads AF is for Chaykin's soft-core porn. It was better than Cinemax after dark.<p>Now, having revisited the first fourteen issues, I gotta say-- not only does the series hold up better than other high-water marks like DKR, it seems even MORE relevant now.

  • July 15, 2009, 9:23 a.m. CST

    Wednesday Comics

    by Series7

    Would have worked, if they had a better deal with USA today. USA today can't be sealing that great anymore. They should have put a new strip everyday, getting people picking up news papers everyday. Also not putting it in news stands only in comic shops is just such a money grab. It could have been something cool, trying to get people outside of fan boys into comics. Now just seems like some lame collectors ploy. Also at $4 bucks fuck that. Should have been 50cents to a $1. Also my LCS in hype of Wednesday comics had this older attempt at a similar thing but with older funny comics like Popeye and it was only a $1.

  • July 15, 2009, 9:24 a.m. CST

    Will Blackest Night ever get here? FUCK!

    by GoodTimeBobby

    ...Love the concept but I fear DC is going to FUCK UP this crossover event yet again!

  • July 15, 2009, 9:25 a.m. CST

    steve-- I tried to read Black Kiss when I was a kid

    by Laserhead

    And I just remember a panel of a chick with a penis, and it sent me, too, into a kind of horrified daze. I think I went back to Thundercats after that.

  • July 15, 2009, 9:27 a.m. CST

    Chaykin WAS a mastermind

    by Joenathan

    Has anyon read his recent Squandron Supreme? P.U.!

  • July 15, 2009, 9:33 a.m. CST

    The chick with the penis

    by steverodgers

    Yup, that's the panel. I was like, "back to GI Joe comics for me then..."

  • July 15, 2009, 9:34 a.m. CST

    Where did you even GET "Rex Hunter" from, Douche?

    by Squashua

    Closest I came was "Rip Hunter", even though it's "Doctor Will Magnus"/"Doc Magnus". If you're going to fail, you might as well have failed as epic as you did. :)

  • July 15, 2009, 9:35 a.m. CST

    Yeah, joe, the last thing I tried reading by Chaykin

    by Laserhead

    was Challengers of the Unknown. It was completely unreadable. I'm always holding out hope he'll make some kind of quality come-back. I still think his "The Shadow" limited series is the best reboot/re-introduction of a pulp character ever. Miles better than Denny O'Neil's touchy-feely Doc Savage.

  • July 15, 2009, 9:36 a.m. CST

    I was like, "back to GI Joe comics for me then..."

    by Joenathan

    ...And then you snuck back later and peeked... PERV-O!

  • July 15, 2009, 9:36 a.m. CST

    Wow thanks Subtitles

    by optimous_douche

    I guess a back-handed compliment is good as any.<p> Not quite sure I understand the Batman remark, but then I'm also not sure I really care.

  • July 15, 2009, 9:39 a.m. CST

    Sqaush

    by optimous_douche

    I read Wednesday Comics, then read Booster Gold, then went to write my Wednesday Comics review.<p> I had Rex Hunter on the brain and Will Magnus I guess just looks like a Rex Hunter to me.<p> Shrug....

  • July 15, 2009, 9:39 a.m. CST

    Wha? Chaykin stinks now?

    by Star Hump

    I haven't read Squadron Supreme. I just checked out All Star Batman and Robin from the library (no way am I paying for that TPB) and it was worse than I could have imagined. God, what the fuck happened to Frank Miller? What a cynical, emotionally stunted hack. Chaykin and Miller used to be the pinnacle of writer/artists! I'm sad.

  • July 15, 2009, 9:41 a.m. CST

    Joen

    by steverodgers

    Ha! I was like, "This GI Joe comic would be about 10 times cooler, if Scarlett just had a penis."

  • July 15, 2009, 9:42 a.m. CST

    Welcome to the blackest night

    by StarchildAD

    Im sure there are a ton of black men in prison waiting to say that to you when they ream you in the @sshole.

  • July 15, 2009, 9:43 a.m. CST

    Chaykin

    by steverodgers

    He really went off the rails. I did kind of like his Captain America one shot with crazy 1950's commie bashing cap. He seems to be a little bit, "trapped in amber" (TM Goosebud all right reserved.)

  • July 15, 2009, 9:46 a.m. CST

    I'm all for Horror comics, but B&W, really?

    by SoylentMean

    Why bring a comic book "back" if you can't even provide color in its panels?

  • July 15, 2009, 9:52 a.m. CST

    Chaykin

    by Joenathan

    His Squadron Supreme is just ass. Just ass! Halfway through I wanted to throw it to the floor and Purell my hands and I don't even own Purell.<br><br>As for All Star Batman and Robin... the less said about that book, the better.<br><br>Speaking of Shit-tastic... I flipped through the latest issue of The Boys at the LCS and then didn't buy it because it sucked and MAN! Did it suck... just saying...

  • July 15, 2009, 9:53 a.m. CST

    Wait...

    by Joenathan

    Scarlett DIDN'T have a penis?

  • July 15, 2009, 10:02 a.m. CST

    I really wish I could support Wednesday comics

    by kalel21

    I really wish I could. I love the old Sunday comics format, with each comic taking up a full page the way they did in the 1920s & 1930s. Some wonderful art and storytelling came out of that art form--"Terry and the Pirate" "Dic Tracy" "Wash Tubbs and Captain Easy" "Gasoline Alley"... The list of classy, high quality comic strips from that era goes on and on. I love 'em so much, I even wrote a book partially about them. (http://www.mcfarlandpub.com/book-2.php?id=978-0-7864-1902-9) I love that a modern comic company is trying to emulate a format that produced so much great stuff. But I agree that $4.00 a pop is just too much. It's simply costs far more than its worth. {comicsradio.blogspot.com}

  • July 15, 2009, 10:05 a.m. CST

    Okay, you are juvenile

    by Joenathan

    Also, I think you have bad taste, because MAN! The Boys sucks. I mean, have you ever seen anything as uber stupid. What's his obsession with dick jokes anyway? Maybe Kevin Smith was right...

  • July 15, 2009, 10:05 a.m. CST

    Kalel

    by optimous_douche

    Very cool book idea.

  • July 15, 2009, 10:09 a.m. CST

    Crossed is the elvish tits

    by StarchildAD

    Ennis still got it. Horse cocks and all.

  • July 15, 2009, 10:14 a.m. CST

    Optimous

    by kalel21

    Thanks for the complement. And at the risk of being absolutely shameless: Here's a link to my second book-- (http://www.amazon.com/Radio-Book-Adaptations-Literature-Airwaves/dp/0786439726/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1247670733&sr=1-1) The coolest moment that came from writing them came when my first book was used as a footnote in the wikipedia entry on the Age of Conan computer game. {comicsradio.blogspot.com}

  • July 15, 2009, 10:21 a.m. CST

    touche

    by Joenathan

    I stand corrected, you are right. All Star Batman and Robin IS as stupid as The Boys.

  • July 15, 2009, 10:25 a.m. CST

    The Robert Crumb strip

    by DrLektor

    you're probably thinking of is a Mr. Natural one where he looks for a spot to meditate and the world literally passes him by. It ends much the same way as it began, empty desert. Doesn't say much about the world of tomorrow does it?

  • July 15, 2009, 10:38 a.m. CST

    I think I read the first two issues of The Boys..

    by Righteous Brother

    it just seemed nasty and puerile to me, even though I loved Preacher, and Ennis' run on Hellblazer. I've met Garth Ennis too, quite a meek little bloke in the flesh.

  • July 15, 2009, 10:42 a.m. CST

    Nothing is as stupid as ASBAR

    by Laserhead

    Except for 'Frank Miller's Will Eisner's The Spirit,' I guess. That was the single most bizarrely incompetent failure I've ever witnessed. And that includes the Bush administration.<p>Miller seemed completely clueless as to how much of his own limitations and weaknesses he was revealing in the picture. It's got Eva Mendes' ass in it, and I STILL won't look at it again.

  • July 15, 2009, 10:49 a.m. CST

    I wonder if we'll ever see Holy Terror Batman..

    by Righteous Brother

    by Frank Miller, where Batman takes on the Al Quieda. Shit, it pains me to type that, especially as I was a complete Miller fanboy. Still love his earlier work though.

  • July 15, 2009, 10:51 a.m. CST

    Wednesday Comics

    by LaserPants

    "Dry-humping"-ness aside, I really enjoyed this as a showcase for some really beautiful artwork. Of all the pages on display, I thought Paul Pope's was the best.

  • July 15, 2009, 10:57 a.m. CST

    I'm not 100% sure if Optimus Douche knows...

    by Righteous Brother

    anything about humping, dry or otherwise to be perfectly honest.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:06 a.m. CST

    I didn't write a book

    by Series7

    But I gots a shameless plug. <P> http://tinyurl.com/m49dyo <P> Why can't all Mighty Muggs be that cool?

  • July 15, 2009, 11:08 a.m. CST

    Yeah why the fuck is Creepy

    by Series7

    In B&W and $5??? Thats ALMOST as bad as paying $4 for a fucking newpaper.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:09 a.m. CST

    Quick Spidey Recap, anyone?

    by _Palmer_Eldritch

    Okay, if I remember correctly, Reilly was Peter's clone made by the Jackal (the Norman Osborn of the day) and then kept hidden for years. He then returned but was revealed to be the REAL Peter Parker, a decision which pissed off longtime fans and was of course revoked about a year later, in effect also pissing off the fans that had stayed on board. <br>What I don't remember at all, though, is whatever happened to Reilly. From the review I gather that he died, but how did that happen?? <br> Btw, I also recall a pretty gloomy Spidey episode around that same time in which Gwen Stacy is brought back to life and Peter somehow loses it and bitch-slaps Mary-Jane. Or was that Ben? Or did I just dream that up?

  • July 15, 2009, 11:14 a.m. CST

    Sometimes I wonder why the big ones are thinking

    by Series7

    Seeing that Marvel/DC and Dark Horse are probably the biggest three comic companies, do they think certain shit will get bigger sales? <P> All that tie in shit marvel does to try to get people to buy more comics, Wednesday comics, now fucking $5 comics from Dark Horse for B&W? Are they trying to push away fans? Especailly when you see the shit the smaller companies are doing. Though Vertigo is part of DC, their $1 comics, Radical give high production for $1 sometimes and not $4. Imagine gives us stuff like Viking for only $3 and when they do charge $5 its at least 100 pages of stuff. Too bad DC and Marvel and Dark Horse just keep topping the sales charts.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:15 a.m. CST

    You're Right Laser

    by optimous_douche

    It was beautiful art work. If that's all I'm getting though, I'll buy an art compilation book.<p> Even if every story was top notch I would have been more forgiving of the price of entry, but that was not the case.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:23 a.m. CST

    The Price

    by Joenathan

    I'm definately being more choosey because of the increase, and I've dropped a few of my on-the-bubble titles, but I don't think any of my core titles are guilty of not giving me what I pay for. I'm enjoying the hell out of them. The titles that I've kept and, most likely, will keep on keeping, really deliver. Sure, I'm not picking up as many new titles, however, if something comes along that I am interested in, I don't give a fuck if its $4, I either buy it or don't. If you really think you're being "ripped" off or that the comics aren't worth it anymore... stop buying them. Thats the only way the big companies will notice. They don't care if the price increase upsets you, they only care about sales.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:31 a.m. CST

    AF! was the best American comic of the '80s

    by DennisMM

    Watchmen, being created by Brits, gets to be the greatest Brit comic of the '80s, even if a US company published it.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:36 a.m. CST

    Don't get why you're taking it so easy on Red Robin

    by Laserhead

    I LOVE the concept. But that book is a floating turd that's seemingly been mishandled and botched from everyone to the writer and artist on through to the editor.<p> I love the concepts of Knight Rider, The DaVinci Code, Battlfield Earth and other stuff, which, upon execution, flatly sucks. Can't let DC get away with this kind of slip-shod shittiness.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:38 a.m. CST

    Since when can Hawkman talk to the birds...

    by SleazyG.

    ...like he was goddamned Aquaman asking Sea Monkeys for backup? Where the hell did that come from? Anyone?

  • July 15, 2009, 11:40 a.m. CST

    I liked Wednesdayh Comics

    by DennisMM

    as a concept. The single-page format limits storytelling possibilities, unfortunately, and only the strongest writers and artists pull it off, with different techniques. Kamandi and Flash did well, and I thought Pope managed a strong Alex Raymond pastiche. I gave Batman points because I love looking at Risso's work. <P> It costs as much as it does because it's not really 15 pages. It's 32 pages. And the paper quality does not lower the printing cost appreciably - using any nonstandard paper actually costs more. Also, they couldn't use a high-grade stock on the book without some serious problems. It wouldn't hold up to folding twice and still be easily handled. So there.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:41 a.m. CST

    Robin - Laser

    by optimous_douche

    When I mentioned some flaws with Robin at the Wizard World DC panel (like you know, why does he think Bruce Wayne is alive) you would have thought I wearing a little Hitler moustache with the fanbase response.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:41 a.m. CST

    SleazyG

    by DennisMM

    It's a Golden Age thing, not used often.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:41 a.m. CST

    Wednesday Comics and Red Robin

    by Mr.FTW

    Wednesday Comics is a really cool idea and could be really fun but at $4 it won't last. If anything it should be a tax write off free campaign that the give to schools and libraries to promote reading and to get new readers interested.<p> I don't think that it's just the unexplained logic the Tim thinks Bruce is still alive as it is the completely different chracterization they have given Tim recently and in that book specificly. It still bugs me too the Tim would wear and alternated reality Robin Costume that Jason Todd also wore. They could have easily just added a cowl to his existing Robin costume which would have looked cooler and made more sense.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:43 a.m. CST

    Who is this fanbase, optimus?

    by Laserhead

    And why have they surrendered the power of rational thought?

  • July 15, 2009, 11:44 a.m. CST

    Also-- Why the FUCK does he call himself Tim Wayne?

    by Laserhead

    That's just damn creepy. Really, really creepy. And it's a slap in the face to the memory of his real father.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:46 a.m. CST

    Dennis

    by optimous_douche

    How does that multiplication work? Because it's large? If I agreed I would concede 30 pages -- are you counting the cover and the Robot Chicken Ad?<p> Regardless, you mentioned 4 stories that you really dug in the piece. Which is what most reviews are saying. Liked this, didn't like this. I enjoyed Wed Comics but...<p> If you want to pay $4.00 for 4 pages (or I guess 10? by new math) totally your perogative.<p> I need to be able to spend more than 5 minutes reading something though for it to be worth that for me.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:47 a.m. CST

    Agreed on the last name thing.

    by SleazyG.

    He should have stayed Tim Drake when Bruce adopted him. Bruce, of all people, would understand.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:47 a.m. CST

    I've read a smattering of Golden Age Hawkman...

    by SleazyG.

    ...must have just missed the strips where he could talk to birds, and it certainly hasn't been part of his continuity in the last quarter century or so.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:49 a.m. CST

    optimous

    by DennisMM

    Yes, I am, sir. I'm talking about printing - it requires as much paper and ink as a 32-page comic. And, as I said, I like it as a concept.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:50 a.m. CST

    Laser

    by optimous_douche

    You would have been amazed at the kowtowing going on. Seriously I thought something was wrong with everyone on this board and the entire Internet the way they were cheering and huzzahing with every title Didio mentioned.<p> There was myself and one other guy asking some of the tough questions, unfortunately other guy got so memorized by Didio's...Omega Beam I guess...taht whenever Didio (who I applaud for this type of reach out) asked, "OK why do you feel that way" -- the kid would just give a "I don't know" answer.

  • July 15, 2009, 11:54 a.m. CST

    Dennis

    by optimous_douche

    But see that's the ways the books are viewed these days. I'm not talking printing costs, I'm talking content.<p> It's a story, we paid 4 dollars for 15 disjointed and incomplete stories.<p> Depending on your personal tastes, you enjoyed some over others, but I have yet to find anyone that enjoyed them all.<P> Hey man, it's a big world and room enough for differing opinions, I think Mr. FTW has it right though. If you wnat to get non-fanboys into comics, you need to show a wee bit of altruism in the process.

  • July 15, 2009, 12:03 p.m. CST

    Optimus

    by Laserhead

    The sad thing about all that, is those cheering goons are who DC is writing comics for now, period. It seems like Didio's job largely consists of going to these conventions, asking these jerks what they want to see, and then mandating that all his writers do whatever these fanboys say. (This is my impression from Newsarama, at least). So much for attracting new readers.

  • July 15, 2009, 12:06 p.m. CST

    Optimus

    by Joenathan

    ...so you WEREN'T wearing a Hitler moustache?

  • July 15, 2009, 12:06 p.m. CST

    Just read the new Wednesday Comic for Superman

    by Series7

    They have it on USA Today. It was fucking stupid, I guess they are playing up the whole Bale Batman voice thing. Also why do Arcudi's capes look like they are folded pieces of paper? <P> Had I just bought a USA today and read that it would have been fine, but if I paid $4 for just that I would have been pissed. <P> Anyone think these will just come out in trade?

  • July 15, 2009, 12:17 p.m. CST

    Will Wednesday Comics Come Out in Trade?

    by optimous_douche

    Doesn't everything these days?<p> They'll also have to recoup losses somehow if people are truly as upset as they say they are about the current price of admission.<p>

  • July 15, 2009, 12:19 p.m. CST

    Blackest Night

    by Joenathan

    ALL I ask for is for ONE zombie boxing glove. ONE! I don't think that is asking too much.

  • July 15, 2009, 12:26 p.m. CST

    LOL Subtitles

    by optimous_douche

    While not literal, the spirit is very true.<p> At my con it was all about Wednesday comics and letting slip that Grant Morrison has complete control of the multiverse.<p> The Clark Kent thing never came up, but I see where you're going.

  • July 15, 2009, 12:27 p.m. CST

    Wednesday Comics in trade

    by Mr.FTW

    Would that format really work for that? Would they just stick 4 months of the WC into a trade where you would still only get 16 pages of story per character? And would people be willing to drop cash for a trade when they only like 75% of the material because not everyone is going to like every story as the talkback here clear shows. Again, I think it's aneat concept but not one really that should be aimed at the fan base.

  • July 15, 2009, 12:33 p.m. CST

    Yay!

    by Squashua

    Woo! Picked up by the A.P. wire! <br><br> http://tinyurl.com/shatta

  • July 15, 2009, 12:33 p.m. CST

    Why is he called Tim Wayne?

    by jake31

    You think he's better off scoring chicks with Tim Drake's coin collection or Tim Wayne's fat wallet? And if his dad's a real man, he'd respect that move.

  • July 15, 2009, 12:33 p.m. CST

    Here's My Guess

    by optimous_douche

    The Wednesday Comics trade will be oversized like Batman Son of the Demon (I think that was the one that was like the size of two graphic novels -- not page count -- actual size).<p> Will it work? Who knows. After reading other reviews I knew my views would be unpoular.<p> Not like I need to be held or anything, but I do feel alone in not rewarding the concept and as a result the execution.

  • July 15, 2009, 12:34 p.m. CST

    Didio did do that with Jason Todd's return

    by Laserhead

    He asked the fanboys what they thought of Todd coming back, and the douchebags all said something like, "It has to tie-in to Infinite Crisis!"<p>So Didio made Judd Winnick completely re-write the ending of 'Under the Hood' so that Todd's return was explained by Infinite Crisis, which wasn't what Winnick had planned (not that he gets any love from me).<p>This is basically what Chuck Dixon came out and called Didio on when he quit/was fired.

  • July 15, 2009, 12:35 p.m. CST

    Wednesday Comics in trade

    by Series7

    is going to look like the Sunday newpaper.

  • July 15, 2009, 12:52 p.m. CST

    Agree with that, Sub

    by Laserhead

    Do you also hate the reformed-detective-version of the Riddler?<p>Peter Milligan wrote a great Riddler story with Keiron Dwyer on pencils once... can't remember the title "Dark Knight, Dark City" or something? It involved occultism and human sacrifice, and the Riddler was actually dangerous and crazy in it.

  • July 15, 2009, 1:02 p.m. CST

    Chuck Dixon

    by kalel21

    I also always enjoyed Dixon's work on Batman (I've also been liking his stuff in the current G.I. Joe series). He has a knack for good basic storytelling, combining nifty action with good plots and characterizations. {comicsradio.blogspot.com}

  • July 15, 2009, 1:06 p.m. CST

    MORE XSTATIX PLEASE

    by StarchildAD

    Peter Milligan, you are reading this, and you know deep in your heart that doop still needs to bang more pussy. Make it happen.

  • July 15, 2009, 1:14 p.m. CST

    Subtitles-Batman

    by optimous_douche

    I'm really not sure how I've been dubbed a Batman fanboy, please explain.<p> I hated RIP and haven't really reviewed any Batman books. Last time I collected the main Batman and Detective books was before I went to college in 93.<P> I like Batman and Robin, but that's more because it is so different than anything that has gone on in the main series.<p> Is that why? The Batman & Robin review?

  • July 15, 2009, 1:23 p.m. CST

    And who wrote 'Face the Face'?

    by Laserhead

    James "I-fucking-suck-shit" Robinson.<p>What a way to totally kill that post-Infinite Crisis momentum.<p>Although I guess the whole One Year Later idea did that all on its own.

  • July 15, 2009, 1:24 p.m. CST

    Next Men, Chaykin, Wednesday and Utopia

    by Homer Sexual

    Soo..last week was super slow, I only bought the first two Utopia titles and Ms. Marvel. <p> I enjoyed Ms. Marvel, but I've always been a big fan of Karla Sofen, she is an actual multifacted, complex villain in hero's clothing. Love her, hate Osborne, BullseyeHawkeye, etc. <p> Utopia was more of the same, with lots of Osborne and lots of negative idiocy. The only thing I found interesting is where Emma Frost's character is heading, and that's not enough for me to continue picking up this storyline. <p> Loved NextMen, hate B&W, undecided about picking this up, but the review echoed my own thoughts exactly so this may be a purchase. <p> I am probably one of the only people who liked Chaykin's Challengers of the Unknown. I also liked his Supreme Powers. Grnted, JMS did way better, and Chaykin's style in both art and dialogue is a bit stiff, but he has some ideas and I find his work to still be interesting and decent quality. <p> Red Robin? That costume is too horrible, won't even give the book a chance. Doesn't sound that great anyway. <p> I can't believe ANYONE would pay $4 for Wednesday Comics. $1 is the absolute MAX I would pay, and it was selling like leftover stale pancakes at my LCS. I expect a quick death on this. <p> I find it interesting that an earlier post thinks today's books are more story oriented and older stuff is more art oriented. Whenever I go back to old issues, expecially my 80's stuff, the art is generally terrible, almost amateurish, while many of the stories are actually very good. I think dialogue is now much, much better and the art is almost always top-notch, but the stories....well, not so much. Most stories nowadays actually encourage a reader to wait for the trade.

  • July 15, 2009, 1:25 p.m. CST

    I'm a Batman fanboy

    by Laserhead

    Bruce Wayne's not a douche. He's just been written as one for the last 20 years, that's all.<p>That said, 'Batman & Robin' is the only comic I buy now, Bruce Wayne or not.

  • July 15, 2009, 1:25 p.m. CST

    Not Taken Personally

    by optimous_douche

    Just looking for the basis.<p> There's something to be said for being a purist, not worth anything, but I immensly respect those that buck the norm and have a good reason.<p> I did read Batman striaght for well over 13 years -- 80-93. I have also colected any of the "best-of" trades that occured between 93-to RIP. I would actually love to know of a few more. Could you list off your favorite bat trades in that time period? Joen turned me on to the Invisibles and I have no shame in using the TalkBacks for some schoolin.<p> I really base my opinion on bruce Wayne off of the old Justice League. Everyone else could take 5 minutes to have some fun once in awhile except Bruce who always had to be serious.<p> Sorry, I think anyone that is serious all the time is a douche.

  • July 15, 2009, 1:31 p.m. CST

    Optimus

    by Laserhead

    You might try giving R.I.P. another shot, now that the smoke has cleared. If you care to, skim through "The Black Casebook" tp, then read the collections "The Black Glove" and "R.I.P." Most fun I've had with Batman since... god, forever. Morrison's Bruce certainly isn't a douche.

  • July 15, 2009, 1:34 p.m. CST

    John Byrne's Next Men

    by Continentalop

    I'm like you Superhero, an ex-Byrne victim. People can complain about Byrne all they want (and with a lot of good reasons) but he was the go-to guy in the 80s. His run on the FF is the only one that can be put down as essential along with Kirby/Lee's run, and the comic he had no interest doing, Alpha Flight, is still one of my all time favorite comic book runs (he kills the leader/Captain America-like figure in the first 12 issues!). <p> My two biggest complaints about Next Men are he never finished the damn things (what the hell happens next?) and that I wish he had used Sathanas in the Marvel Universe. While Sathanas isn't the greatest of names, the idea of a MUTATE war criminal from the future could have easily been transformed into a MUTANT war criminal from the future and been one of the best X-Men villains ever.

  • July 15, 2009, 1:44 p.m. CST

    optimous - printing vs. content

    by DennisMM

    I come from a graphics/journalism background, so I may think different from many. Thanks for the insight.

  • July 15, 2009, 1:46 p.m. CST

    The reaction I saw to Wednesday Comics

    by Laserhead

    Lot of people looking at the pretty pictures, flipping through, finding the price... and putting it down.

  • July 15, 2009, 1:49 p.m. CST

    Wednesday Comics

    by Series7

    Should have just been turned into daily comics through USA Today damnit.

  • July 15, 2009, 1:56 p.m. CST

    Was it Barry Allen?

    by Laserhead

    That would be fantastic.

  • July 15, 2009, 1:56 p.m. CST

    Wednesday Comics

    by DennisMM

    Should have been in every fucking newspaper in the country! Like the Spirit Section.

  • July 15, 2009, 1:58 p.m. CST

    Laserhead

    by DennisMM

    I love it! Flash: Rebirth -- oops, dead now. Bring back Wally as he should be. Wonder what his new costume is going to look like? Maybe it'll be some variation on Johnny Quick, whose costume I always liked.

  • July 15, 2009, 2:02 p.m. CST

    Who died this week in the DCU?

    by Series7

    Wednesday Comics????

  • July 15, 2009, 2:05 p.m. CST

    Collected All of The Legends of the Dark Knight

    by optimous_douche

    Even have everyone of the damn color coded first issue.<p> Hey, here's a good idea, Batman is a real dark charachter so let's make the covers pastel and use every shade in the paz easter egg coloring kit.

  • July 15, 2009, 2:10 p.m. CST

    Oh wait, I know who died

    by Laserhead

    It was two characters who Didio had SAID had died in Final Crisis; then he back-stepped and said, "Oh, uh-- the two characters who died in FC were ALTERNATE universe versions of those characters."

  • July 15, 2009, 2:11 p.m. CST

    I want a batman comic

    by Series7

    That just so dark and bleak that the whole thing is just black. script and draw the whole thing and just paint the entire thing black. It would be awesome.

  • July 15, 2009, 2:13 p.m. CST

    And that all black batman comic shall be called

    by optimous_douche

    Smell the Cowl.

  • July 15, 2009, 2:16 p.m. CST

    I think DC already came up with the title

    by Series7

    But put it on the wrong series. Blackest Knight.

  • July 15, 2009, 2:17 p.m. CST

    Smell the Cowl

    by Continentalop

    Its such a fine line between being stupid and clever.

  • July 15, 2009, 2:18 p.m. CST

    Faces

    by DennisMM

    by Matt Wagner. Damn, that was good comics. WTF ever happened to Wagner doing his own comics, BTW? I want more Aerialist and Mage. Good Mage, not like Mage II.

  • July 15, 2009, 2:18 p.m. CST

    Shows how good the editorial coordination at DC is

    by Laserhead

    Two major writers kill off the same characters in their two major event series, and the editor has to back-track and make up an excuse about what readers saw in the first event series.<p>Meanwhile, I'll say it again, Marvel's continuity is running like a well-oiled engine. Just wish I cared about any of their characters (besides Cap).

  • July 15, 2009, 3:15 p.m. CST

    But is Wednesday Comics ...

    by DennisMM

    more enjoyable than Transformers 2 (to rip another TB)?

  • July 15, 2009, 3:17 p.m. CST

    You realize that

    by Squashua

    With about 20 more posts, we'll be the third highest talkback of recent times, right?

  • July 15, 2009, 3:18 p.m. CST

    Subtitles_Off

    by Mr.FTW

    Hush was really awesome... for 11 1/2 issues at least. The fight between Batman and Superman was finally depicted the way it should be where Batman wouldn't stand a chance. It had a lot of great chracteriazation and moments too. The ball was just dropped so hard when Hush turned out to be a character invented for that story instead of actually Jason Todd.

  • July 15, 2009, 3:18 p.m. CST

    Marvel's continuity is running like a well-oiled engine

    by Joenathan

    It is. I'm really enjoying the current set up. Did I read that right, Homer? Did the second part of Utropia come out? I must have missed it. Damn crossovers with books I don't usually buy...

  • July 15, 2009, 3:24 p.m. CST

    We been #1 the last two weeks

    by Laserhead

    For, like, a few hours.

  • July 15, 2009, 3:25 p.m. CST

    DC is retarded

    by gooseud

    Every single time they have a chance to do something cool, they fuck it up. EVERY SINGLE TIME. Laser nailed it above, great editorial coordination there LOL EEEEEEEEdiots!

  • July 15, 2009, 3:26 p.m. CST

    I dont think that was Eva Mendes's ass

    by gooseud

    Ok so I obviously didnt watch the Spirit, but upon reading the above comments, I went straight to my trusty google, and I think that is one of those cheap cop out body double things with Mendes's ass there. You never really get a clear look at her face. I feel cheated.

  • July 15, 2009, 3:34 p.m. CST

    Eva Mendes poops, you know...

    by Joenathan

    just saying... big honkin' poops. Grunters.

  • July 15, 2009, 3:37 p.m. CST

    Homer

    by Mr.FTW

    The Red Robin costume isn't that bad, not when it's being done by Alex Ross and in the pages of Kingdom Come. It just make so sense that Tim would wear it or for that matter that Tim would even use the name Red Robin. That right there lays the foundation for the misguided approach to that character and comic.

  • July 15, 2009, 3:39 p.m. CST

    The Boys front to back review

    by gooseud

    Worked called today, and no one is actually going to read this because I'm too late, so I'll keep it short and sweet. Here goes: There are idea guys, and there are execution guys. Kirkman is an execution guy. His ideas suck ass, but he executes them in fantastic fashion. Ant-Man? A zombie comic? Yet another teenage superhero book where his dad had powers too? Terrible ideas, yet Kirkman makes them pretty awesome. Then there are idea guys. Take Ennis. His ideas, without exception, are fuckin awesome. A John Wayne preacher who inherits the power of God? Zombies who, instead of being mindless, are pure evil? An uber-realistic take on Frank Castle? An organization of ass-kicking agents who keep corrupt heroes in line? Awesome ideas. Yet more often then not, the execution isnt there. Why? Ennis's own stupid bullshit "shock tactic" tics. The first 18 issues or so are honestly terrible, mildly stupid brain-dead entertainment at best. The intro arc? The Russia arc (one of the worst things I've ever read)? Terrible. But.....but..... I'm going to say something that is going to get me flamed: The Boys has moments. Some actually really good moments. Its a fantastic idea for a comic. I was shocked myself to find there were large passages that DIDNT suck. Starting around issue 20.....gulp....it actually got.....kinda GOOD. The entire 4 issue arc where Butcher confronts Homelander, with the history of the evil corporation? Let me put on my flame retardent bomb suit here......it was awesome. The entire 4 issue arc was awesome. The following arc where they confront the X-Men analogs (G-Men)? Not terrible by any means, with a pretty legitimately shocking and affecting climax. The problem is, and always has been, that Ennis is undone by his personal tics and sexual hangups. I mean, to go from the Homelander arc to......Herogasm?? How does one guy write both those books? Using the SAME characters?? Its truly a WTF thing for me as a comics fan. I just dont think the book will ever achieve its potential, nor will any written by such a schizophrenic creator.

  • July 15, 2009, 3:46 p.m. CST

    Ennis just died for me

    by DennisMM

    at some point a couple of years ago. I know what he's trying to do, but for me it doesn't fly. "Crossed," especially, is a waste of my reading time and even offends me. I had to stop reading it.

  • July 15, 2009, 3:50 p.m. CST

    Re:DC

    by Laserhead

    Yes, yes they do keep fucking up every big chance. And it's very, very frustrating.<p>The aftermath of Infinite Crisis, which instead of straightening continuity involved the One Year Later storylines, which killed any sense of relevance or immediacy in the books.<p>Final Whatjusthappened, and its lack of ramifications and the sudden incoherence of the whole DC universe.<p>The non-death of Batman in R.I.P., reported on half-heartedly by a very confused media, followed by the actual death of Batman in FC, and its complete ignoring by the mass media.<p>Literally everything about Battle for the Cowl, Red Robin, and Batman (Winnick's).<p>The "deaths" in Blackest Night of two major characters who we were told got killed in FC.<p>Have I left out any of the big ones?

  • July 15, 2009, 3:55 p.m. CST

    DC continuity

    by Mr.FTW

    I'm holding out that Johns can fix DC if they will just let him.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:02 p.m. CST

    I totally agree Goose

    by Joenathan

    And the worst part is: Given the choice, you just know that Ennis would rather do a gerbil up the ass joke then anything else. Once, maybe, with the right delivery, a gerbil up the ass joke can be funny, but the seventh time, by the same mongoloid? Not funny. Ennis's whole problem is himself and his retard sense of humor. Hey Garth, lets have another character blow their face off, so they look like a butthole... you haven't used that one in a while... come on... do it. You know you want to....

  • July 15, 2009, 4:08 p.m. CST

    I always said I loved the idea...

    by Joenathan

    behind the book, Ieven bought the first six or so, because of my Preacher love, hence my excessive hatred for such a retard product... Also I didn't read as far as Goose, so as for whole arcs being good thing, I can't comment, I just figure that Goose is much nicer than me, so that's probably just his frilly pink tutu talking.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:09 p.m. CST

    Sub, Robin

    by Laserhead

    Yeah, but none of Tim's actions and current have credible explanations. I posited one of the many things hinted at in FC that could give Tim a reason for this journey-- there's about ten others if my idea was stupid. And Tim could have left with a lot more dignity, with a better sense of purpose, than his whiny crazy-talk from issue #1. And the art looks like chalk etchings done with someone's toes. (Great covers, though). I chalk all that up to shitty performance on the parts of all involved.<p>And I don't think it's a big deal, but it seemed logical and organic that Tim would become the new Nightwing. Except he's a Kryptonian and star of one of those Superman books, so Tim's gotta be Red Robin.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:15 p.m. CST

    Utopia and Red Robin

    by Homer Sexual

    Yeah, last week was both the Utopia comic that started the storyline and the latest issue of Uncanny X-Men, which was the second part of Utopia. Emma looks mighty sexy in her Black Queen outfit, but I am just very sick of this "Mutant Hating Public" and "Villains manipulating the retarded masses to persecute the heroes" Now they are calling for Cyclops' head, for goodness sake. <p> Like I said, Emma Frost almost makes it worthwhile, wondering what is up with her: did she break up with Scott? What is her real agenda? <p> But Dark Beast? Mystique impersonating Xavier? Rampant Mutant Persecution? Yawn. <p> Dark X-Men has Cloak and Dagger, who are interesting but make no sense in this context. And worst of all: DAKEN! I like Daken as a character, but him trying to pose as Wolverine is just stretching my suspension of disbelief too far. He is taller, thinner, has a gigantic arm tattoo and HIS F*ING CLAWS ARE OBVIOUSLY DIFFERENT! Yet, everyone buys that he is the "real" Wolverine. Um, no thanks. I am even dropping Uncanny X-Men for now. Love Faction, Love Dodson, Don't Love this story.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:22 p.m. CST

    Subtitles_Off

    by Mr.FTW

    I get what is going on with the Tim Drake character I'm just saying for the most part it doesn't make any sense. That's a big part of what has turned me off of that comic so far and I'm the same for others. Tim striking out on his own is a strong enough concept that doesn't need a gimicky yet recognizable costume, out of character characterization or a blind quest. Tim doing his own thing without Bruce, Dick, Alfred or the Titans is enough for fans of the character and would be a great starting point for folks who haven't followed the Time Drake character before. But theyre making Tim a pissy, cloudey headed douche, putting him in a costume of an alternate reality Dick Grayson that was last worn by a guy he can't stand Jason Todd. That costume and name isn't a mantle that Tim should or should want to carry. Plus, even though we the readers know Bruce isn't dead, Tim doesn't know that and has no reason to think that he isn't. Bruce has said Tim is a better detective than him and the fact that are available to Tim don't support his blind quest. The combination of thiese things is off putting.<p> So other than the newly invented Tommy Eliott what did you not like about Hush?

  • July 15, 2009, 4:22 p.m. CST

    Do you mean other heroes or just the public? (Also: Mutant hater

    by Joenathan

    Other heroes thinking he's wolverine is dumb, especially if they've met real Wolverine, but the public...? They'd probably know the suit more than the face.<br><br>You know what I never understood? How come people look at... say... Wonder Man and coo "Oh, he's so awesome!" (They did! Once... a long time ago... shut up!) Anyway, how come they look at Wonder Man orHercules or most of the Avengers with their powers and their flying and they fist punching and what not and they cheer.... but they look at Cyclops and go: "FREAK! FUCKING FREAK! STONE HIM! STONE! HIM! FREAKY SON OF A BITCH! KILL HIM!" <br><br>Do mutants smell different or something?

  • July 15, 2009, 4:31 p.m. CST

    Hush

    by Laserhead

    The art was good, and I'm not a Lee fan, but I liked the chicks and Lee's super-hero Batman. But the story is a series of interminable events that don't string together with any kind of causality. It's just a lazy device that tries to let Jim Lee draw everybody he wants to draw in the Batman universe. Sort of like Loeb is doing with Ed McGuinness in Red Hulk now. Episode to episode, Hush was a loosely strung-together series of issues featuring a villain of the month. There needn't be anything wrong with that. But the idea that each of those episodes were a part of Tommy Elliot's intricate master-plan is ridiculous-- a plan with that many contingencies isn't a plan at all. It's lazy scripting. You follow a mystery for a year-- a mystery that makes very little logical sense --and you expect that the revelation of the villain's identity will be something meaningful, and not the guy you knew the hack-writer was going to make it be, another brand-new-character-from-the-past he introduced in the second issue. Loeb is toxic. That's why Hush blows. It's a terrible story. Again, though, I like the pin-up art.<p>Dini did manage to make Hush and Tommy Elliot somewhat compelling in his arc last year, though.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:32 p.m. CST

    OK, so you TB'ers don't like The Boys.

    by Squashua

    How about HEROGASM?

  • July 15, 2009, 4:33 p.m. CST

    That's what's never made sense about mutants

    by Laserhead

    They live in a world where tons of other people who aren't mutants look weird and have magical powers. How, exactly, is their discrimination achieved, since the general public doesn't know someone's a mutant just because they look weird and have special powers?

  • July 15, 2009, 4:34 p.m. CST

    Herogasm

    by Joenathan

    is like undiluted The Boys. Its pure 100% radioactive stupid. nothing but one long dick and fart joke.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:40 p.m. CST

    The Boys

    by optimous_douche

    Wee Hughie is the shining light and shows the glimmers of Ennis' past works like Preacher --- the humanity behind the libido.<p> I take the base dick and fart jokes for what they are -- dick and fart jokes. I'm a guy, this stuff in small doses does make me giggle. Large doses like the russia storyline -- too much.<p> When he balances it with Hughie's normality though -- not excellent -- but good stuff.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:41 p.m. CST

    Morrison's X-men

    by Joenathan

    That was one of the many good things about Morrison's X-men. He used a lot of freak mutants,to show that the X-men are the pretty, pretty rockstars of the mutsnt world, but still... Why is the Thing a hero and Ice Men a spawn of the devil to these people? Why was Avenger Beat Accepted as a blue furred monster, but Human Beast with big feet gets chased by a vicious mutant hatin mob?

  • July 15, 2009, 4:41 p.m. CST

    Discrimination against Mutants and D8M Patrol

    by Squashua

    I never understood that either. Especially with the ones who can HIDE. Elastic Woman (D8M Patrol) is a "freak" because she grows big? Seriously? BFD. Superman can fly and no one criticizes him.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:44 p.m. CST

    Ennis and CROSSED

    by Squashua

    I read issue #0 and have been reading several reviews of subsequent issues online and I think I can so far surmise that CROSSED is like a sadist version of diet WALKING DEAD. I'm going to buy the TPB after the last issue (it's purported to be issue #0 + 9 issues), but has anyone been following it, truly? My small FLCS doesn't buy too many unrequested indies to line the shelves these days.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:44 p.m. CST

    Marvel's mutants vs superpower people

    by Mr.FTW

    That is the major disconect I have never understood in the Marvel universe. Why the Fantastic 4, Iron Man, Cap ect are embraced but mutants are still locked up and percecuted. Personally I'm sick of and have been sick of the mutant descrimination idea for years. If I were a mutant in the Marvel U I'd just ell people the government gave me some radio active fruit punch from the moon and that's where my powers came from, that I was a hero and not a mutant. The X-Men need to be excised to their own universe or incorporated more. The diconect between how they are viewed within the universe makes no sense.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:45 p.m. CST

    That is

    by Squashua

    if Avatar Press (that's the publisher of CROSSED, right?) produces a TPB.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:46 p.m. CST

    Herogasm

    by Joenathan

    Dick and Fart jokes? Whatever, they're stupid. The one where the guy farts in the prostitutes face... ok... I giggled, but the girl with the bleeding pussy because she'd been fucked so hard? There's digging at superhero tropes and there's adding realism to super powers, and then there's unnessecary, you know? And the Boys is almost all unnessecary.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:48 p.m. CST

    Mutants: Threat or Menace?

    by Squashua

    I agree that mutie discrimination is a poor rationale these days. You have the anti-mutie sentiment and JJJ vs. Spider-man, but then-again there are the Avengers, etc.<br><br> I think where Civil War divided the heroes and Secret War created internal mistrust, Dark Avengers will end up setting up an atmosphere of mistrust from the "normals" against ALL powered/augmented individuals within the Marvel Universe, regardless of standing.<br><br> Which is how it should be if anti-mutie sentiment is to be embraced.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:48 p.m. CST

    Crossed

    by Joenathan

    Ok, I am obviously biased, but Squash, seriously... Do NOT buy the Crossed trade, flip through it or look it up on-line. Wee Hughie is the balance in Boys, right? Well, Crossed is Boys without wee Hughie. All unnessacary. ALL. If I can give a highest possible recommendation, it would be: Do not buy Crossed without flipping through it first.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:49 p.m. CST

    Crossed sucks

    by Series7

    I don't get why Ennis gets much praise instead of Ellis. The shit Ellis is doing at Avatar is so much cooler then the stuff Ennis is doing. Crossed sucks check out No Hero. Crossed has like 3 crazy shots and 0 story, it doesn't even come close to the first issue of the Walking Dead. Even the Walking Dead as a whole is more gruesome then Crossed.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:49 p.m. CST

    Yeah, right--

    by Laserhead

    when the young mutant manifests his strange powers to his horrified family, why doesn't he just tell them, "Wait. Wait. Calm down. It's okay. I just got hit with a truck of radioactive goop on the way home. I'm not a mutant. I'm just a super-hero."

  • July 15, 2009, 4:51 p.m. CST

    The Crumb strip...

    by stones_throw

    Was actually called "A Short History of America" and the final caption was "What next?!!" Here's a link: http://tinyurl.com/ntd8t3 <p>I would have found that out in time for the review, but I had to fall into line with the strict "No research" @$$hole policy. Either remember it hazily or make it up. Ask Rex Hunter.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:51 p.m. CST

    Herogasm

    by Joenathan

    I don't buy them... I read them and don't pay fo them, so I am actively stealing from Ennis. Take that, dickhole! HA!

  • July 15, 2009, 4:52 p.m. CST

    Grayson and Wayne as Batman and Robin

    by Squashua

    I like Grayson as Batman and Damian as Robin. It creates a very entertaining pairing. There are only so many ways a writer can play with Bruce in the all-knowing Batman spot, guiding a Robin. A team of Grayson and Tim Drake Wayne would have been too much like watching the same guy in both spots. Damian Al Ghul Wayne being a privileged, blood-thirsty brat puts a nice spin on the dynamic.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:53 p.m. CST

    mutant manifests his strange powers

    by Series7

    Why would that freak anyone out I've always wondered. Unless every mutant comes from some religious bible fucking house. I think if I came home one day and told my dad and mom that I could shoot fireballs out of dick, they would say "Not in the house. Take the fucking trash out".

  • July 15, 2009, 4:54 p.m. CST

    Radioactive goop

    by Joenathan

    Because it would come out eventually. Their parents would want to sue the trucking company and then they'd figure out it was a lie... and thats what dirty mutants do, right? They definately stone him then.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:54 p.m. CST

    Subtitles, Joe, Squash, and the Boys

    by gooseud

    Squash: One cant underestimate how bad that Russia storyline sucked. It was terribleness on a epic scale. Unreadable....Subtitles: believe me, there is nothing half hearted about my opinions on the Boys. The first 3 arcs were amongst the worst I have read in years, literally. Joe was absolutely right to drop it after 6 issues. The last 2 arcs were amazing (I only read til issue #29, so I cant speak for recently). The issue that shows what happens when the 7 try to save the airplane is amongst my favorite single issues I've read recently. Awesome........ Joe: I would tell you to read those last 2 arcs, but you would have to sit through some truly dismal shit to get there, so I dont know (shrugs) maybe you will just have to take my word for it, that believe it or not, that title is actually capable of being awesome as balls.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:54 p.m. CST

    Also

    by Squashua

    I only read the "Batman and Robin" title. I will not give my money to a Judd Winick production, and I'm sort of meh on Dini.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:54 p.m. CST

    Whoops.

    by Laserhead

    That joke came long after FTW's. Ouch.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:54 p.m. CST

    Herogasm

    by gooseud

    is actually mildly amusing. I wish they would just keep that shit over there where it belongs and let the regular title try NOT to be retarded every 3rd panel

  • July 15, 2009, 4:56 p.m. CST

    Getting powers by being hit by a truck

    by Squashua

    Joenathan, did Matt Murdock sue the trucking company that dropped the goop off the back of the truck?<br><br> For that matter, did Splinter or any of the ninja turtles?

  • July 15, 2009, 4:56 p.m. CST

    Yeah I picked up Herogasm

    by Series7

    Not knowing it had anything to do with Boys. While I find it amuzing, the story needs to go somewhere soon.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:57 p.m. CST

    I flipped through that one

    by Joenathan

    Like I said, I like the idea, the anti-establishment-ness of it... thats appealing... its just... how many more noses are going to get bitten off? Ugh. Poor execution, worse focus. Pure failure.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:57 p.m. CST

    Mutants vs. Super heroes

    by gooseud

    I'll rip DC all day for being frozen in amber (TM) but man, is there ANYTHING more tedious, boring, played out, tiresome, and never ending as mutants being persecuted? Does it ever change? Sweet jesus, just come up with a new gimmick already. Say it with me people: NO...........ONE.........CARES!!!!! Say what you want about Whedon's Astonishing run, but he realized one thing if nothing else: mutant persecution sucks ass and is B O R I N G.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:58 p.m. CST

    Not you, sub... Ennis

    by Joenathan

  • July 15, 2009, 4:58 p.m. CST

    Matt Murdock's family were screw-ups

    by Joenathan

    In the modern day world, they'd be on Judge Mathis by next week.

  • July 15, 2009, 4:59 p.m. CST

    THE BOYS - The 1 thing I don't get

    by Squashua

    Supposedly the premiere super-team, THE SEVEN, have their new addition in Starlight or whatever. And Hughie is dating her. And it's been months since she was added to the super-team.<br><br> So where's the publicity? Didn't anyone interview her or see her, or show her off yet as part of the roster? Why hasn't Hughie just SEEN a picture of Starlight, considering all their surveillance and research activity?<br><br> Granted, Butcher has seen her, but only through the hijacked video feeds.

  • July 15, 2009, 5 p.m. CST

    End Mutant Persecution - Elect a Mutant President

    by Squashua

    There you go.

  • July 15, 2009, 5:01 p.m. CST

    Not just boring... it doesn't make sense

    by Joenathan

    They're Avengers and children of the Fantastic Four. Whats the difference at this point? Maybe itf it translated to ALL heroes, maybe, like Busiak's whole "the hatred always simmeres below the surface" thing, that would be okay, but to have the Human Torch and Magma standing before you and for you to look at them and ask Johnny for his autograpgh while throwing a rock at Magma is stupid. It makes no sense.

  • July 15, 2009, 5:02 p.m. CST

    The Boys one interesting idea

    by gooseud

    Professor X gathers these mutants around him because he is a pervo who loves underage kids. And surprisingly, the title broaches this idea with actual thoughtfulness and not a single dick joke to be found. Somehow, Mr. Dick-Joke managed to spend a 7 issue arc on this topic without a single "crossing the line" moment and actually makes you think when your done. Believe me, no one is more surprised to be typing that sentence then me.

  • July 15, 2009, 5:02 p.m. CST

    Squashua - Matt Murdock

    by DennisMM

    Retcons (Miller, I believe) indicated that they wont some sort of judgment that paid for reconstructive surgery on Matt's face. That's why he's only slightly scarred.

  • July 15, 2009, 5:05 p.m. CST

    Squash- The media

    by gooseud

    I think the point of the story is (I'm guessing here) is the Seven are incompetent fuck ups who never actually do anything heroic or fight any crime, nor does any of them give interviews besides Homelander (if they did, it would be exposed what idiotic douchebags they are in 5 seconds flat). So if she isnt out fighting crime, and isnt giving any interviews........

  • July 15, 2009, 5:05 p.m. CST

    I often like Ennis' more extreme side...

    by stones_throw

    Like it because you can tell it's a writer indulging in what he enjoys writing. If Ennis does the best war comics out there, he also does the most genuinely (often revoltingly) funny ones, too. Anyone read his AUTHORITY: KEV miniseries? They've got some of the best patented Ennis gross-out humor and mockery of superheroes (two great targets in the Midnighter and Apollo) and it works because it's never taking itself too seriously. The hero is a typical inept Irish Ennis character, an ex-SAS soldier, I believe. At the start of one adventure we see how his actions unwittingly lead to Earth's destruction and then he's forced to go back in time and team up with his mortal enemies in the Authority. I think they asked Ennis to write something for THE AUTHORITY and he just turned in a few issues of drinking, swearing and violence in Northern Ireland. In a more comedic series, the disgusting situations and body humor fits right in. With a more dramatic tone, not so much.

  • July 15, 2009, 5:07 p.m. CST

    Next Week: Planetary

    by gooseud

    Man, i'll say this, if the Boys, a flawed project if there ever was one, generates all this, I cant wait to see what my "Planetary: Front to Back" commentary does. Planetary is to The Boys as Captain America is to John Walker. Joe has his pants around his ankles as we speak!! heh heh

  • July 15, 2009, 5:09 p.m. CST

    Stones

    by gooseud

    Midnighter and Apollo are like fish in a barrel, I would pay to see Ennis write that series all day and twice on Sunday.

  • July 15, 2009, 5:14 p.m. CST

    Wait, BACK UP. PLANETARY ends next week?

    by Squashua

    Seriously? The last issue is coming out? It's been what, 5 years now?

  • July 15, 2009, 5:16 p.m. CST

    Subtitles_off, stop being such a curmudgeon.

    by Squashua

    Better?

  • July 15, 2009, 5:32 p.m. CST

    Squash

    by DennisMM

    My understanding is that there will be no Planetary #27 until October, assuming Wildstorm lives up to its word. Can't come soon enough.

  • July 15, 2009, 6:50 p.m. CST

    The Clone Saga

    by Speedstream

    I have already dropped Spider-Man once. If they bring Ben back...then frak it up - consider me essentially done with Marvel 616. Captain America is really all I have left...and after the crap that is 601 and the only thing good about Rebirth being Hitch...Marvel is doing itself no favors. I'll only be grabbing Millar's Ultimates and Ultimate Spider-Man if it suddenly hasn't become crap.

  • July 15, 2009, 7:44 p.m. CST

    Dennis MM

    by LaserPants

    Matt Wagner just did something for Vertigo (I believe it was Vertigo, def. DC) called Madame Xanadu. He wrote it, didn't draw it. I flipped through the trade today. It looked interesting. I may pick it up later down the line.

  • July 15, 2009, 7:56 p.m. CST

    Planetary isn't ending

    by gooseud

    For the record and for those who might not know, I have access to tons of random comics and did a huge comic buy. So I read the Boys front to back. Next week I'm reading Planetary front to back (which I haven't even touched in.....wow, like 2 years? 3?). After that, LOXG and then probably Lucifer.

  • July 15, 2009, 8:17 p.m. CST

    killing bruce.....

    by sonnyhooper

    ....if they "killed off" bruce wayne forever would it really be that bad? seriously... couldn't DC just re-launch LEGENDS OF THE DARK KNIGHT, and tell bruce-wayne-as-batman stories until the end of time anyway? will the world come to an end if bruce wayne isn't "in continuity" batman in the DCU? it's not like the general public cares anyway, so it won't really effect the movie franchise. so why not do it?

  • July 15, 2009, 8:23 p.m. CST

    Wednesday Comics review sumed up

    by Tall_Boy66

    "I'm cheap."

  • July 15, 2009, 9:24 p.m. CST

    if you don't like caldewll on WW you are a retard.

    by ironic_name

  • July 15, 2009, 9:53 p.m. CST

    EVA_MENDESS_ASS_LOG

    by ironic_name

  • July 15, 2009, 10:59 p.m. CST

    Mutants vs. Super-heroes

    by Continentalop

    I'm gonna have to give Ellis and his explanation in the Newuniverse why people fear these new breed of people. The Spitfire character and the guy who in the old series who was president (to lazy to look up the name right now) have a great debate about the nature of these super-powered people, and that explanation should be used in the regular Marvel U. <p> For me, the hatred of mutants versus altered humans can only be summed up by jealousy and fear of competition. You will never be a mutant - they were born with those powers and you haven't got any so you can't be one - but you can always someday be altered and become a mutate. Yeah, pretty weak rational but since it is a comic book I can live with it.

  • July 16, 2009, 12:13 a.m. CST

    A future story with Dick as Bat, maybe...

    by crankyoldguy

    though we call know Bruce (who will come back, of course), would stay Batman as long as he could and by that time Dick would probably be in his 40s maybe. The new books are interesting looking enough, though I'll wait for the graphic novel collection of Battle and then the follow-up story arcs as I did with Resurrection of Ras and RIP and then get 'em from the Library. Some us need to keep in tight, money-wise.

  • July 16, 2009, 12:15 a.m. CST

    and truth be told about Chaykin...

    by crankyoldguy

    he's way more clever and smarter than Miller. That doesn't take away from DK Returns, etc. but Chaykin can do dark and light, wit and more.

  • July 16, 2009, 12:15 a.m. CST

    and truth be told about Chaykin...

    by crankyoldguy

    he's way more clever and smarter than Miller. That doesn't take away from DK Returns, etc. but Chaykin can do dark and light, wit and more.

  • July 16, 2009, 12:22 a.m. CST

    double post...sorry...plus bad grammar...

    by crankyoldguy

    too tired now...I"m out

  • "Hey...you know that character that has had hundreds of millions of fans following him worldwide for the last 80 years? Well, I think I can do better, so I'm gonna kill him off permanently after a movie based on him won more critical accolades than any other comics-based movie ever. Oh yeah, and there's that posthumous Oscar thing, too. Whatever, man...you guys know what I'm saying--nowhere left for the character to go, which is why bajillions of people love him so much, so I'm gonna kill him and leave him dead like forever. That cool?" Hubris? No, I dunno what it means. I bet it's not even in the dictionary, is it? You just made that shit up, didn't you?

  • July 16, 2009, 3:32 a.m. CST

    Or maybe if we don't like Caldwell on WW...

    by SleazyG.

    ...it's because it fucking sucked.<p> I mean, just for example.<p> Not every indie darling is a perfect match for every mainstream property, a fact which both good editors and good readers can comprehend.

  • July 16, 2009, 4:08 a.m. CST

    nope, its cause you are a retard.

    by ironic_name

    with downs syndrome. and trisomy.

  • July 16, 2009, 4:21 a.m. CST

    Subtitles_Off

    by Continentalop

    I agree with you, but man why the condescending attitude? The guy asked a legitimate question - one I don't agree with but he was far from being an asshole or a dick about it. Why the "smarter-than-thou" reply? <p> And before you come back at me with some cocky, witty put-me-in-my-place answer, just remember you're talking to a bunch of guys on a comic book forum. Being A No. 1 TBer is not really that great of goal if you think about it. Its like saying you got a gold medal at the special olympics.

  • July 16, 2009, 6:05 a.m. CST

    Spooning with Subtitles_Off

    by optimous_douche

    Love Nexus and Fables.<p> Sorry, but I think Watchmen truly changed comics and does still hold-up pretty well.<p> If we can't cuddle because of my Watchmen stance, could we still manage a small reach around.

  • July 16, 2009, 6:11 a.m. CST

    Tall Boy Wednesday Comics

    by optimous_douche

    If you're saying you're cheap, that's cool, I don't know you.<p> If you're saying I'm cheap, well...you don't know me.<P> I've paid insane amounts of money to feed this comic monkey on my back.<p> $4.00 bucks though fro some pretty pin-up art...no. At the end of this thing almost $50 for 15 half stories....No. Despite what DenisMM claims, the comic standard of late has been 22 pages of "content". Just becaus eit's larger does not mean I'm getting more content. I'm not cheap, I DEMAND a complete product.

  • July 16, 2009, 7:05 a.m. CST

    Fuck Sandman.

    by StarchildAD

    Lucifer is where its at. ALL THE WAY.

  • July 16, 2009, 7:28 a.m. CST

    Mutant/Superhero: No Prize

    by steverodgers

    Maybe there is something inherent in Mutants that makes regular folks know they are something different, something to be feared. Like how you can almost always tell that CGI effects aren't real. Maybe this triggers a fear response in folks, that can't be explained, an evolutionary tick that fires off a feeling in folks that says: these guys are my enemies, they must be stopped, or they will eventually become the dominant species, and humans will be no more. There is just something about them that creeps you out to the core, regardless of looks, actions or temperament.

  • July 16, 2009, 7:52 a.m. CST

    So apparently.....

    by gooseud

    Lucifer is going to be good? I'm going into it knowing virtually nothing about it.

  • July 16, 2009, 8:05 a.m. CST

    I'm not trying to be a dick......

    by gooseud

    but that is a TERRIBLE reason not to kill Bruce Wayne permanently. Because hes popular and traditional? WTF? IF you had said after Star Trek IV, or after season 3 of TNG, that the franchise would basically be dead for years within a few years, no one would have believed it. "WHAT?? Star Trek is TRADITIONAL! It has MILLIONS of followers!!" What about if you had said what would happen on the day before Phantom Menace came out? How Star Wars within 10 years would lose virtually all of its cultural relevance due to incompetance? Absolutely no one would have believed it. Actually, you know what else was popular and made lots of money? Home Improvement and According To Jim. Cultural touchstones all, there (rolls eyes). When was the last time anyone in here, and be honest, gave a glowing review to a Batman book? Or cared? Hush sucked. The broken back thing sucked. RIP sucked. His "death" in Final Crisis sucked. His son (or clone or whatever) sucks. Dark Knight Strikes Again sucked. Virtually everything about him has sucked for years, and we are talknig multiple years, decades maybe. So basically, the argument is, "Well we are standing over this morass of horseshit stories....but we cant change anything, because people might be mad". Interesting.

  • July 16, 2009, 8:22 a.m. CST

    Blackest Night

    by Series7

    I guess my LCS REALLY wants everyone to read it. Since I didn't want to buy it, they let me take a copy with me and if I like it I can buy it next time, if not just bring it back. I hope its as much fun as Flash Rebirth.

  • July 16, 2009, 8:27 a.m. CST

    and Tall Boy

    by Series7

    While I may be cheap optimous by no means is not cheap. He only buys variant covers. Just ask him about his collection of rare Dazzler covers. Wednesday comics is just a cheap money grap and fails at what could have been something cool and possibly got non comic fans into reading comics. Now its just an inclusive thing that only DC die hards will buy. My shop only ordered enough copies for people who subscribe to it.

  • July 16, 2009, 8:31 a.m. CST

    Pet Avengers

    by Series7

    While Marvel made how many reprints of the Spidy/Obama cover? How come they didn't do anything with the Variant cover for the new Pet Avengers in which they hang out with Obama's dog?

  • July 16, 2009, 8:36 a.m. CST

    Madame Xanadu

    by Pogue__Mahone

    I'm diggin it! Give it a peek!

  • July 16, 2009, 9:26 a.m. CST

    "too real and too dark for a mainstream DC hero book."?

    by v1cious

    what the shit?

  • July 16, 2009, 9:31 a.m. CST

    If Bruce Wayne should be killed off, Peter Parker

    by Laserhead

    --should go first. Spider-Man is a coming-of-age story that's been going on for forty fucking years. Batman's popularity isn't so rooted in a specific point of emotional growth as the Peter Parker character. Basically people have just been trying to capture and remake the Lee/Ditko issues for forty years- which achieve a kind of closure when Pete graduates high school and starts telling everybody off, issue thirtysomething.<p>Bruce, I don't know-- I like him as a guy who got into this because of his overwhelming rage and obsession to avenge his parents, but now, he's been doing it a long time, and it's his life, because he feels a responsibility to his abilities. All sorts of places he can go, and I can even picture him retiring (alive).

  • July 16, 2009, 9:41 a.m. CST

    Goose

    by Joenathan

    be warned... I've got my debating pants all set out and ready to wear, if I find that I don't agree with your assessment of Planetary.

  • July 16, 2009, 9:42 a.m. CST

    Also

    by Joenathan

    The Boys still sucks. It sucks Donkey. It sucks so bad, it has its own event horizon.

  • July 16, 2009, 9:43 a.m. CST

    Also also

    by Joenathan

    I can't blieve someone actually reads Wonder Woman. I mean.... I assumed they were out there, but... I just never actually expected to see one...

  • July 16, 2009, 9:48 a.m. CST

    Talking to birds

    by Gislef_crow

    During the Silver Age the Hawk couple used to talk to birds all the time. When they used the Absorbicon or whatever to learn about Earth and blend into human society, they picked up bird-speak as well. Of course, they presumably should have also picked up animal-speak, and fish-speak (thanks for making Silver Age Aquaman even more redundant!) and insect-speak. Maybe they just want to speak to a higher class of animal? Don't know how that applies these days, though: Maybe Johns can unravel it...

  • July 16, 2009, 9:54 a.m. CST

    Bruce and Peter... Dead

    by Joenathan

    There's no need to kill them off. There's no need to acknowledge the passage of years. <br><br>Long term continuity is the bane of comics.<br><br> There's no need for a character to acknowledge stories that happened over a decade ago to the point that they are cemented (read: creatively confined) within such restrainin pre-determined boundaries UNLESS it directly references the current story. <br><br>Bruce Wayne isn't 80. He's 35, at the most, forever. Peter is 23. Forever. Comic continuity should dance between raindrops, ALWAYS. <br><br>Why is Wolverine on some many teams? Because he is popular. <br><br>How can he be in so many places at once? Because fuck you, thats why. <br><br>You can't force it all to fit. The best you can hope for is for the last couple of year to mostly fit together into a bigger story, like the current Marvel effort. Yes, there are continuity flubs and questions there, but for the most part, it fits together and works off itself. The main part of Secret Invasion didn't take 8 months. It took three days. You just have to accept that kind of shit and move on or you on't get to enjoy your read.

  • July 16, 2009, 10:05 a.m. CST

    That being said

    by Joenathan

    I don't see any reason why a Dick and Damien as Batman and Robin comic couldn't continue on forever.

  • July 16, 2009, 10:05 a.m. CST

    Double Amen on The Boys

    by Joenathan

    No Un-Amening, locked up, infinity plus one.

  • July 16, 2009, 10:06 a.m. CST

    I don't think either should be killed

    by Laserhead

    either. Just saying, if you think Batman stories would benefit from Bruce's death, there's a long list of characters whose books would benefit more, going by that rationale.<p>And I agree there's no Batman and Anybody dynamic without Bruce. Semantically, it's better to say that the creators are exploring the effects of Bruce's legacy on those he left behind, while plotting his eventual return.<p>What, though, is the solution to long-term continuity? Have a global reset every ten years (Crisis)? Or, if you just ignore the continuity, at what point do you start doing that-- year ten? year fifteen? last year? Long-term continuity is a problem if your main character can't really age and die (unlike long-form soap operas), but I think that for clarity's sake you need to be clear on what's current continuity and what isn't.

  • July 16, 2009, 10:21 a.m. CST

    Continuity

    by Joenathan

    I think that you just don't need to worry about it. Take Iron Man, for instance. All you really need is the basics of his origin and that he used to be a drunk and that's it really. You can move on perfectly fine from there and write fantastic Iron Man stuff. Maybe the armor wars might be used because it was uber-cool, but really, you don't need to acknowledge any of it, unless you're going to play off it. <br><br>I mean, lets say you're Matt Fraction, writing the fuck out of a realistic-ish bend on Iron Man and using quite a bit of his history, BUT... <br><br> wouldn't that whole effort be sunk if you were forced to shoe-horn in the fact that Iron Man once (A) WENT BACK IN TIME and (B) MET KING ARTHUR! and not just the historical templates for the eventual legend, but like the legend himself, as if he existed? the whole deal? It doesn't fit with the tone you have established.<br><Br> Now, you don't have to get rid of it, it was a perfectly fun, silly story with Iron Man and Dr. Doom, there is no reason to ret-con it out of existence... you just don't have to acknowledge it. You don't have to pick up that particular toy and play with it. Leave it alone. Some one else will use it, if they want.<br><br>Basically, I don't think you need to reboot the universe every few years, now maybe a re-establishing and new jumping on point for potential new readers isn't a bad thing every once in a while, but you don't need to wipe shit out and start again. You just compartmentalize. New creators have a basic set-up and then they use what they want from the toy chest in order to build their version of the old game and each new set of creators is a new era. I mean, ca't we dub everything from Daredevil and Avengers disassembled to now as the Bendis era? It is definately separate from the Claremont X-men era, which the Fraction era uses, but doesn't hold completely to. <br><Br>The only thing absolute adherrance to long term continuity does, is force every successive new creator to work with one hand tied behind their backs.<br><Br>You don't have to acknowledge all of it. I mean, I know if I was writing Wolverine, I wouldn't acknowledge half of that crappy origin shit, easily half off it I'd turn away from.<br><Br>Doesn't that make sense?

  • July 16, 2009, 10:23 a.m. CST

    Sorry Sub

    by Joenathan

    It was locked up, no torch, no lockpick. Sorry, I don't make the rules.<br><Br>The boys suck.

  • July 16, 2009, 10:28 a.m. CST

    Grant doesn't plan to kill Damien

    by Laserhead

    He portrayed a future where Damien is Batman after Dick is killed, in Batman #666. The story tied to all sorts of things in his current and future arcs-- Batman vs Satan, Professor Pyg, the replacement Batmen. I actually thought it was more like Grant planned to kill off Dick.

  • July 16, 2009, 10:31 a.m. CST

    Serial storytelling means you CAN'T ignore continuity

    by Laserhead

    without a very specific definition of what's in and what's out. Like I said, do you start ignoring what happened ten issues before? What about last issue, does that get thrown out the window.<p>Sure, all you need for any super-hero is the basics of their background in order to tell a good story with them. But beyond one story, you now have a set of narratives connected through causation and logic-- stories that lead to other stories --so it becomes impossible to just 'ignore' part of the chain.<p>I think you need specific resets periodically.

  • July 16, 2009, 10:44 a.m. CST

    Subtitles_Off

    by Mr.FTW

    Why can't you chill about the whole Bruce Wayne thing? I understand your points and I get where you are coming from but yours is not the only valid opinion. I've been reading comics for over 20 years and I think it is fantastic and long over due for Dick Grayson to get his shot at being Batman. You're right not anyone can put on the suit but Bruce Wayne didn't surround himself with just anyone. Granted, the real life reason they introduced Dick was for some wish fulfillment but writes have changed who and what Dick Grayson is. People like to toss around the stuck in amber thing and the way to avoid that is allowing characters to grow which is one of the things that was so stupid about One More Day/Brand New Day it wasn't just that they had Spider-Man make a dea with the devil they wiped out all of the maturity, knowlage and growth that character had gone through. Allowing Dick to be Batman allows for new stories to be told with new character growth and depth. If anything you you be happy about Dick being Batman, Dick doesn't want this role but is trying to live up to something he thinks he should, when this run is over and Bruce returns it will only solidify your stance athat only Bruce can be Batman but we'll get some good storys, cool moments and see character change along that way. It also gives them the cance to bring Bruce back with a fresh breath, bringing back what makes the character work and discarding the things that have been weighing him down the past few years. And if nothing else for at least a short time Dick might be Batman but Batman isn't a dick which he has been for far too long.

  • July 16, 2009, 11:07 a.m. CST

    Subtitles_Off

    by Mr.FTW

    If you would have read the entire thing you would have seen that I'm not offened at all by your stance but seeing as how you enter into a discussion forum but don't want to discuss I'll take your advice and just skip over and ignore any post you make from here on out.

  • July 16, 2009, 11:13 a.m. CST

    Batman doesnt have to die

    by gooseud

    but heres the thing. Batman, Superman, Spidey, these characters have been around for-fucking-ever. Writing them is nearly impossible. Writing SEVENTEEN TITLES A MONTH FEATURING THEM?? Impossible. I think I fall somewhere between Joe and Subtitles, and FTW. I'm not saying Batman has to die. How about retiring? Or better yet, you know what the answer is? Give Spidey, Bats, Supes, one title each. Thats it. One title. You put your best guys on it, the cream of the crop, to be able to write this comic is considered the holy grail. Then, you let them run. ITs amazing, when you take an amazing writer (Morrisson), put some editorial constraint on him, take away all inter-title continuity (but let him play with all past history), and let him run. You know what happens when you do that? You get All Star Superman. Or Brubaker's Cap run. This isnt a difficult formula, but somehow comic companies cant master it. I know it isnt economically feasible, but I dont care. You want creative goodness, thats what you do.

  • July 16, 2009, 11:16 a.m. CST

    Grant Actually Makes

    by optimous_douche

    being batman uncool...and I think that's what I sort of dig.<p> Dick is reluctant to take on the bat, even mentioning how much he hates the cape.<p> What I take out of the title is that, yes, Gotham can have a multitude of defenders, but none will strike the same instantaneous fear or the Bat.<p> And I respectfully have to disagree on the marketing front...at least mass marketing beyond the fanbase. If they really want to break these titles away from just the fanboys, making Dick Batman was an insane move given the popularity of the movie.<p> It's like the "Do Andriods Dream of Electric Sheep" comic that came out this week. Why they didn't call this thing Bladerunner baffles me. I heard two kids going WTF is this? As soon as I said Bladerunner they went a-ha.<p> We are in a knowledge class all our own gentlemen.

  • July 16, 2009, 11:20 a.m. CST

    OR....

    by Joenathan

    You have Batman... featuring Bruce Wayne and then you have Batman and Robin, but it's a world where Dick and Damien wear the costume. Is it the same universe? Eat shit, you douchenozzle!<br><Br>As for continuity, I think it would be obvious what has come with and what hasn't. 10 issues might be a little close to ignore, sure, but my preferred model would be... for example... Fractions Iron Man, he writes four years of Iron Man stories, tells his tale and hen leaves the book... THEN there is no Iron Man title for a month or two UNTIL someone new comes along and then they can build off what Fraction created OR they can go a different route. We already live in a Trade-waiting-to-happen World, so why not facilitate that model, since it is the future, after all...

  • July 16, 2009, 11:31 a.m. CST

    To Joe, RE: Wolverine

    by Homer Sexual

    "How can he be in so many places at once? Because fuck you, thats why." My knee-jerk response is "No, Fuck you!" and that's why I dropped pretty much all Wolverine-related titles, but I do still get Origins and New Avengers (New Avengers in spite of, not because of). <p> Ok, I admit I picked up the first issue of Herogasm because I had no idea it was connected to the boys, but it was trashy and had good art and was fun. I also got the second issue. I know this is going to end up somewhere I hate, with the Boys ripping the super-heroes to shreds, but I just won't buy it anymore when that starts to happen. <p> I certainly agree that long-term continuity is the an impossible albatross. I think the essence of the character is the key. I also think the Ultimate U. had a great idea, basically re-starting some books with a new twist, but it has apparently gone awry at this point.

  • July 16, 2009, 11:33 a.m. CST

    Geek cred...

    by Joenathan

    Calling it "Do Androids dream of Electirc Sheep" is the geek version of name-dropping a brand new band that hasn't splashed yet. Its a douche move. (Not Optimus Douche, regular douche) Ohhhh, you're so cool, you know the book it came from... I hate those guys.

  • July 16, 2009, 11:35 a.m. CST

    The point is...

    by Joenathan

    It's silly to be concerned with how Wolverine gets around. He teleports. There. Wolverine is also a teleporter.

  • July 16, 2009, 11:39 a.m. CST

    Man...

    by Joenathan

    That Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow is nice.

  • July 16, 2009, 11:57 a.m. CST

    I just see it a little differently.

    by Homer Sexual

    As you've probably noticed, there are certain things that just take me out of my ability to simply enjoy a story. <p> NO WAY wouldn't everyone notice the wrongness of Daken Wolverine. He is too high-profile at this point for everyone not to notice his claws being wrong. I mean, we notice Lindsey Lohan losing weight, for example. <p> Same thing with him being in X-Force, X-Men and New Avengers. It's just too much. I think it's the over-exposure as a reader of all three books, I just can't get past it. <p> I totally agree with the concepts of limited runs, new creative teams, limited continuity. Then you get All Star Superman (on the plus side. On the minus, All Star Batman and Robin). <p> I am just a huge foe of over-exposure, I suppose, no matter who the character is. But even Spider-Man, despite his zillion individual titles, is at least only in one team book.

  • July 16, 2009, 11:59 a.m. CST

    over-exposures next victim

    by Series7

    Deadpool, sadly.

  • July 16, 2009, 12:08 p.m. CST

    Well, good, I hope he does kill Damien

    by Laserhead

    Good on, Mr. Morrison. No need to suffer Batman: The Clone Saga.

  • July 16, 2009, 12:09 p.m. CST

    I WANT that GBU comic.

    by ColinSL

    It'd almost be like watching the movie! But with comics! Jesus would have voted No on 8. http://tiny.cc/qojfR

  • July 16, 2009, 12:16 p.m. CST

    Not actually a big fan of Johansson as Black Widow...

    by stones_throw

    They needed someone more powerful, more mysterious, more femme fatale (more European really) to play one of Marvel's best female characters and surely the best from the '60s. Scarlett and her previous roles, especially in genre movies like THE ISLAND and THE SPIRIT runs the risk of making the Black Widow just another hot babe.<p>Which admittedly, she is.

  • July 16, 2009, 12:17 p.m. CST

    I don't see Dick as a marketing gimmick either

    by Laserhead

    From a marketing perspective, it doesn't make a damn bit of sense. If you want to market the Batman comic successfully, you put your best guys on it, make it Bruce in the cowl, and time it so that when The Dark Knight comes out, new issues are available as impulse-buys at convenience stores, grocery and drug stores, etc., and you make sure it's easy to jump on.<p>If Dick is a marketing gimmick, it's one of the most mis-handled in recent memory. Note how confused the mass media was when it tried to report on Batman's "death" in R.I.P.

  • July 16, 2009, 12:18 p.m. CST

    Yeah, I think Johansson's too curvy for Widow

    by Laserhead

    Not exactly a lithe ballet-gymnast's body. Course I also think she's not very pretty, and delivers lines like she just took a fistful of Ambien. Being in a movie based on a Dan Clowes comic doesn't make an actress smart.

  • July 16, 2009, 12:18 p.m. CST

    Blackest night

    by brassai2003

    If you are not reading Blackest night, you are missing out on what "event" books are all about. This is everything "Crisis" and Secret Invasion should be. PS: I think Nekron is the Big Bad...you heard it here first! Anyone else read BN?

  • July 16, 2009, 12:38 p.m. CST

    Well, I did the "Free Read" of Blackest Night...

    by Homer Sexual

    In the LCS yesterday. It seemed kind of fun, with all those different colors, and kind of dumb with all the zombies SPOILER!!!!!! <p> Zombie Ralph and Sue Dibny? Pretty stupid. I mean, it was fun enough, but for a major, serious comic event it seemed awfully silly. <p> Also, the two "big deaths" are characters who are always being killed, brought back, changed up,etc. So no opinion on that, except that the cartoon version of the female character is a thousand times better than the comic version has ever been. <p> Also, Scarlett Johansen is terrible casting for Black Widow, but she could have been just fine as Sharon Carter. Famke Janssen would have been a great Black Widow, much more appropriate than as Jean Grey.

  • July 16, 2009, 12:57 p.m. CST

    Homer

    by Joenathan

    I think they addressed that in one issue somewhere and Osbourne or maybe Barton said something to the affect of "So some nuts scream about it on the internet and the world keeps on turning."<br><br>Also, think about this: Someone goes: "Hey you're not the real Wolverine!" So what? What happens if they go: "Yeah, I'm the new Wolverine, duh." what happens then? Is Dakken a known criminal or does he get fined for copywrite infringement? What?

  • July 16, 2009, 12:59 p.m. CST

    Johansson

    by Joenathan

    She looks better than I expected. Her suit looks pretty good, I think. Not nearly as Ba-zoom-ba as I expected.

  • July 16, 2009, 12:59 p.m. CST

    Femke Jansen as Black Widow

    by Mr.FTW

    She would have been awesome... about 15 years a go. It's not that she isn't still hot she is just too old. Too old for what any studio would ever allow in that type of role. Just go back and watch Golden Eye and pretend she is Black Widow in that.

  • July 16, 2009, 1:49 p.m. CST

    Scarlett Johansson was terrible in that dating movie

    by Squashua

    You know the one, where she's a yoga instructor.

  • July 16, 2009, 2:02 p.m. CST

    Clone Saga Recap For Palmer Eldritch

    by MattAdler

    Here's the quick recap (or as quick as a Clone Saga recap can be and still make sense). The Jackal created a Peter Parker clone (as well a Gwen Stacy clone who would resurface later) with identical memories to the real Peter, and set up a fight between them at Shea Stadium, both believing they were the real deal. They quickly realized there was no reason to fight each other, and they turned on the Jackal. In the ensuing chaos, part of the stadium collapsed, and the clone was thought to be killed. Spider-Man convinces himself that he is the real Peter Parker, end of story. But it turns out the clone wasn't killed, merely knocked unconscious. Still thinking that he's Peter, he goes back to his residence, and sees Peter with MJ, and concludes that he himself is the clone. Upset and distraught at this revelation, he flees, and winds up going on the road, out west, for 5 years (this is covered in the Lost Years mini and TPB), and adopting the name Ben Reilly for reasons explained in the review. He periodically calls the Parker residence because he still has an emotional attachment to Aunt May, just to hear her voice. On one call, her neighbor answers, and informs him May is in the hospital. This is what prompts him to return. The Jackal returns as well, sowing confusion as to who is the real Peter Parker; tests are eventually performed which show that Ben is the real Peter. This is what causes Peter to flip out and accidentally hit Mary Jane. Peter winds up retiring, and Ben takes over as Spider-Man. But soon events cast doubt on the test results (the behind the scenes stuff that led to the reversal is covered in my interview with Tom, and also the classic Life Of reilly colums), and Ben and Peter team-up to uncover the true mastermind behind everything, which turns out to be a resurrected Norman Osborn. Ben dies saving Peter from being impaled by Osborn's Goblin Glider. The end.

  • July 16, 2009, 2:29 p.m. CST

    It is NOT debatable

    by Joenathan

    that soccer is better than football.

  • July 16, 2009, 2:45 p.m. CST

    Well...

    by Joenathan

    as long as you are aware of it... Nah-nah-nah-nahnah, Douchenozzle, locked up. HA!

  • July 16, 2009, 2:53 p.m. CST

    I'll counter the Morrison assertion

    by Laserhead

    He DID write cool stories with Bruce as Batman: The Black Casebook, The Club of Heroes, The Third Batman, and R.I.P. are all very, very cool Batman stories.<p>There. Countered.

  • July 16, 2009, 2:55 p.m. CST

    Also, one more time--

    by Laserhead

    Morrison's Bruce Wayne is not a dick. He's an uber-alpha-male whose awesomeness soils both boxers and panties, for different reasons.

  • July 16, 2009, 2:58 p.m. CST

    I meant "douche" not "dick"

    by Laserhead

  • July 16, 2009, 3:22 p.m. CST

    I think he'll write those stories yet

    by Laserhead

    I agree that he could be telling these new stories with Bruce. Easy. And then they'd be some of the greatest Batman stories ever told. Right now, no, they're not Batman stories. They're Batman Family stories. Nothing I've ever been interested in-- but it's really, really fucking enjoyable. I wish he was using Bruce, but he's not, and I don't know why. And like I said, if it's just a marketing gimmick, it's the dumbest one I've seen since New Coke. They already had a great marketing gimmick in place, the best, this big summer movie.<p>I gotta say, though, I don't really want to see character growth involving Bruce with Damien as Robin. That would make Batman and Robin something like The Courtship of Eddie's Father. Right now it's like, I don't know, Simon and Simon. And it's not Batman, but whatever it is, it's A+ fucking comics, so there's a level I'm just really glad for that, and happy to pay for the ride.<p>I think at the end of this year or so of issues, Damien will be dead, Dick will blame himself (so maybe he will be a wreck), Bruce will return, and maybe, just maybe-- having used this omega-sanctioning to redefine and recast the character --Morrison will get to use Quitely, et. al, for a run of great Batman stories.

  • July 16, 2009, 3:41 p.m. CST

    Yeah, it's a pipe dream

    by Laserhead

    But like I said, whatever you want to call the book known as Batman & Robin, it's top-shelf comics.

  • July 16, 2009, 4:04 p.m. CST

    Dick Grayson isn't a great character?

    by Continentalop

    Oh, I disagree. He might not be great now, but the original idea was pure brilliance. Yeah, a 10-year old fighting crime is as realistic as a man running faster than the speed of light, but as I have said before without Robin there would be no Batman right now. It is what separated the character from all the other Pulp Hero Shadow/Spider/Green Hornet rip-offs. Nowadays there are no pulp-hero characters in comics so we want Batman to fill that gap, but back in the Golden Age and even Silver Age those characters where still fresh, so Robin helped make Batman go from pulp hero to super hero. <p> Plus Grayson has always been the best Robin because he was originally intended to be a young Bruce Wayne. Parents died when he was young, swore to avenge their deaths - Bruce could see that he and Grayson had a lot in common. In fact, Grayson is the only one of the Robins I could ever imagine taking over for Bruce - it is the role he has been training for his entire life.

  • July 16, 2009, 4:08 p.m. CST

    Black Widow

    by Laserhead

    http://tinyurl.com/lw4lbg

  • July 16, 2009, 4:08 p.m. CST

    Subtitles_Off

    by Continentalop

    Black Widow first appeared in Iron Man during the Cold War as a Russian spy. Her real name is Natasha Romanoff and she was a former ballerina married to a Russian cosmonaut. When her husband "died" (later revealed to have been faked) she wanted to do something else with her life so the KGB recruited her to be a spy and trained her, then sent her to spy on Tony Start. She also recruited Hawkeye to work with her.<p> After learning that USA is A-OK, she defected and later joined up with the Avengers. She then later became Daredevils partners. I know much later there was this entire ret-con thing where they say she had the super-soldier formula, is a former lover of the Winter Soldier, and is something like 60+ years old, but I try not to think about that stuff.

  • July 16, 2009, 4:10 p.m. CST

    Or I could have just given you a link like Laserhead did

    by Continentalop

    If I wanted to do it the easy way.

  • July 16, 2009, 4:41 p.m. CST

    Former lover??

    by gooseud

    Dude BuckyCap (AKA Mr. Awesome) is tagging it as we speak. And no one is as hot as Black Widow as she is currently being portrayed in Cap, shes the smokingest thing goin.

  • July 16, 2009, 4:42 p.m. CST

    Thats why Bruce Wayne doesnt like Hal Jordan

    by gooseud

    The two biggest Alpha Males on the block staring each other down. Bats doesnt like that Hal doesnt fear him and has the power to do something about it.

  • July 16, 2009, 4:43 p.m. CST

    The Multiple Villains don't bother me for Iron Man

    by Continentalop

    You just got to look at it as a Bond Movie: <p> Bond = Tony Stark <P> Felix Leiter = Rhodes <p> Villain = Justin Hammer <p> Henchman = Whiplash <p> Good Bond Girl = Pepper <p> "Bad" Bond Girl who turns Good = Black Widow <p> SPECTRE/SMERSH = 10 Rings <p> Blofeld = Mandarin (I hope)

  • July 16, 2009, 4:44 p.m. CST

    I meant former lover during the Cold War

    by Continentalop

    And yes she is hot, but I just wish they didn't come up with the ret-con saying she is a 60+ year old super-soldier that ages slowly and was trained by Bucky/Winter Soldier.

  • July 16, 2009, 5:16 p.m. CST

    "TOTALLY ROCKED IT RADIOHEAD STYLE

    by uberman

    You mean, "Beep Beep Bloink Sproing Bleep (Whine...Whine) Beep Sproink Bleep (Garble garble whine some more) Beep Keerang Bleep (mumble mumble Whine Garble) Etc. That, my freinds, is what you sign up for everytime Radiohead puts out a new CD.

  • July 16, 2009, 5:36 p.m. CST

    garth ennis sucks donkey dick.

    by ironic_name

  • July 16, 2009, 5:42 p.m. CST

    been reading batman for 30 years now...

    by sonnyhooper

    ....so i can't help but giggle when people assume stuff about me because i ask a question. <p> anyway, the point i was trying to make is; if bringing bruce "back to life" is going to be "stupid" anyway, then why do it? why have a batman;rebirth, or a "bruce wayne has become unstuck in time" moment, or any other horrible contrivance that it will take to bring him back into current DCU "continuity"? especially when you can tell bruce as batman stories until the end of time anyway by simply having a non-continuity book? <p> LEGENDS OF THE DARK KNIGHT told some of the best batman stories ever. and it didn't have a thing to do with "continuity". thats all i was trying to say. <p> really don't understand the grumpy guy with his "you kids in your robin costumes get off my lawn." attitude. dude, it's comic books... unclench.

  • July 16, 2009, 7:47 p.m. CST

    Kids today...

    by crazybubba

    just have no respect for the classics. Dick Grayson kicks ass. They should temporarily kill Bruce Wayne and make him Batman for awhile.

  • July 16, 2009, 8:03 p.m. CST

    wait..... you had a point?

    by sonnyhooper

    oh right, you don't like dick grayson. ok, got it. <p> and pumpkin, you couldn't talk down to me if you were on top of a mountain. <p> anyway, i still don't see how getting LotDK back would be a bad thing.

  • July 16, 2009, 8:33 p.m. CST

    but.....thats the point.

    by sonnyhooper

    continuity ruins everything. so why bother with it? <p> let dick grayson be batman in the DCU proper (until the next CRISIS of WHATEVER comes along and resets everything anyway) then have a NEW book with bruce as bats, free from continuity. maybe green lanter or superman show up every now and then so bruce can tell them to "get out of MY city." <p> best of both worlds, everybody wins.

  • July 16, 2009, 10:31 p.m. CST

    "Because fuck you, thats why. "

    by the milf lover

    That is the best explanation I've ever read for all the comic book continuity problems that ever happened. It makes too much sense so the readers just cant accept it.

  • July 17, 2009, 8:10 a.m. CST

    Getting Too Old To Relate To Mutants, Guys?

    by Buzz Maverik

    When you turned from a lumpy little pre-teen into a lumpy teen, there was a moment (unless you were some little apple polishing titmouse, which you weren't because you wouldn't be here if you had been)when you looked at yer parents (if you had 'em) and thought,"How the hell did I come from that?" and they looked at you and thought, "How the hell did that come from me?"<p>Now, mutants as a generational metaphor has always worked better for me than mutants as oppressed minority, but I can see that too.<p>Yer thinking too much. We talked about that, and you agreed to stop.<p>Now, I will think too much. As mutants are created naturally, I suspect the fear is that the mutants will replicate, whereas it's much harder to get a serum from the Masters of Evil or have Loki enchant your crowbar. Maybe not.<p>This is why I like a little Sense O Won-der and freak factor in my comics.

  • July 17, 2009, 9:55 a.m. CST

    "Because fuck you, thats why. "

    by steverodgers

    It would be a breath of fresh air if the next EIC's at DC/Marvel weren't these fan friendly super accessible guys like Didio and JoeQ - but these total assholes, and at the fan forums at cons they just cut the bullshit and were like, "we're doing what we like, we don’t care what you think, you can buy it or not, we're just trying to sell books, and we don't care why Wolverine is in 9 places, and you can all go fuck yourselves, go talk amongst yourselves, I really don’t care, I’m off to do some lines, maybe eat a shit load of KFC, and then I’m going to find some drunk girl dressed as Mary Marvel..."

  • July 17, 2009, 10:13 a.m. CST

    Somebody does need to smack some of those whiners

    by Joenathan

    I mean, I am all for a superior product and for watch-dogging the lazy and incompetant creators that sometimes get employed, but some fans are just retarded ass stubborn nit-picky bastards. How the fuck does it matter if Wolverine is in a bunch of books? Even more so, does it really matter to the point that you need to see his itinerary and travel plans? If you don't like the character, fine, don't by the book, but if you can't understand why he's in a million titles, then you're either being purposfully stubborn because your whiny ass little mary ann feelings were hurt because you think people should have acknowledged you as a comic genius or you're a fucktard moron... or both. Which do you prefer? I've never been to a con, but I've been to similiar events where some friendless jackass in a cheetos stained t-shirt and a fanny pack with the belt disappearing beneath his gut's overhang stands up and asked the most asinine, unimportant question and in such an ungrateful, undeservedly condescending tone... How come no one recognizes Clark? Because it's a comic you fucking retard, what the fuck? Is this your first day reading comics? God! I hate those people. They make me embarrassed to be a comic fan. Now I want to be EIC, just so I can mock fanboys until they cry...

  • July 17, 2009, 10:16 a.m. CST

    Just so no one here starts crying...

    by Joenathan

    That rant wasn't directed at anyone in particular.

  • July 17, 2009, 11:24 a.m. CST

    Everyone whines when they don't like something

    by Homer Sexual

  • July 17, 2009, 11:27 a.m. CST

    But when someone likes something

    by Homer Sexual

    Then they basically say "eat shit and die." And call others fat losers who never get laid. Yawn. Personally, I almost wish the creators would say the fans can go fuck ourselves, because that would save me serious money. Comics exist because of fans, bitchy, question-asking fans. Without them/us, there would be NO comics. None. <p> So that's my rant and I am out of here. See you next Wedneday. Peace.

  • July 17, 2009, 11:29 a.m. CST

    Which is why I am going to whine right now

    by Continentalop

    God I hate Wolverine. I would rather have him die than Dick Grayson or Bruce Wayne. Or even Ted Kord. Or in the Marvel U Janet van Dyne, Scott Lang or even Bill Foster. <p> And if people ask me why? <p> "Because fuck you, thats why. "

  • July 17, 2009, 11:42 a.m. CST

    Not liking Wolverine is fine.

    by Joenathan

    He is definately over-exposed and easily mis-used in a really boring and trite way. Having an opinion on something like that is fine. Whining is even fine, like Homer said, we all do it. But when you focus on something, just for random example, like how Wolverine can be in more than one team book at once... dude, you're missing the point, thats not important. It's the whining about trivial unimportant crap like that, that honestly has no other explanation outside of "money", that is a waste of time and deserved of a swift kick to the balls.

  • July 17, 2009, 11:46 a.m. CST

    Besides

    by Joenathan

    I think the bitchy, whining, question askers are actually the minority.

  • July 17, 2009, 12:34 p.m. CST

    Not Throwing Stones

    by steverodgers

    If these companies want to take questions from fans, then go for it, and people can ask whatever they want, I just think it would be really funny, if a EiC was a total dick or JoeQ or DanD had a massive meltdown up there and was like, "this farce is over, I don't care what you say, or you think, or anything... I just want to go back to the hotel, and sleep with some hookers." (I like the idea of EiC's being these massive hooker and coke fiends... makes it more fun)

  • July 17, 2009, 12:44 p.m. CST

    Madame Xanadu

    by DennisMM

    Is good, as has been Wagner's other big company work in recent years. But I want to see him write and draw his own characters again.

  • July 17, 2009, 1:25 p.m. CST

    editors at cons

    by the milf lover

    should always answer those fat whiners the way Homer did at the Itchy And Scratchy panel when he was voicing Poochie.

  • July 17, 2009, 1:26 p.m. CST

    STATHAM FLYING SIDEWAYS HOLDING GUNS

    by the milf lover

    Now that's a comic I'd gladly pay $4 for!

  • July 17, 2009, 1:32 p.m. CST

    "silly, grinning knob"?

    by DennisMM

    Where does that come from? Dick Grayson has never been silly when I've read him. If anything, he takes himself far too seriously. And as Batman, he's positively grim. He doesn't even seem to enjoy it, as Bruce Wayne did.

  • July 17, 2009, 1:35 p.m. CST

    EICs AREN'T massive coke-fiends?

    by Joenathan

  • July 17, 2009, 1:44 p.m. CST

    DennisMM

    by Mr.FTW

    That just comes from one guy's raging hate on for Dick Grayson

  • July 17, 2009, 2:18 p.m. CST

    Otherwise know as...

    by Joenathan

    Raging Dick hate

  • July 17, 2009, 4:01 p.m. CST

    "Sidekicks make zero-fricking sense."

    by sonnyhooper

    i totally agree. but only if the hero is immortal. otherwise, it might be a good idea to train an apprentice. just in case.....you know.....the hero happens to die saving the universe, or something. in THAT case...... well then you might want a side-kick that can take over for you.

  • July 17, 2009, 8:31 p.m. CST

    I will go into my entire point why Dick Grayson is awesome

    by Continentalop

    Next TB. It will blow your friggin' mind!

  • July 18, 2009, 12:35 a.m. CST

    let me save you the trouble..

    by sonnyhooper

    ......dick grayson rules because he was the FIRST. the original. the kid side-kick to end all kid side-kicks. anyone who does not like grayson, SUCKS DICK FOR MONEY! yes that makes you a whore....deal with it.

  • July 18, 2009, 8:35 a.m. CST

    Sidekicks Not Making Sense? Yeah,..

    by Buzz Maverik

    ...Robin is silly. Now, that billionaire dressed as a bat, doing impossible stuff, THAT makes perfect sense.

  • July 20, 2009, 3:09 a.m. CST

    Rex Hunter?

    by s8ntmark

    Try Will Magnus...